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‘Cambia Tu Look’ PeopleEnEspanol.com Interactive Tool

Innovative Interactive Tool Allows for Uploading Photos, Trying on Celebrity Hair and Makeup Looks, Plus Click-to-Buy Products

-First Hispanic Website to Offer Beauty Tool for Hispanic Consumers-

-T-Mobile Premiere Sponsor-

Further expanding on its celebrity style coverage online, PeopleEnEspanol.com today launched a new interactive tool, http://www.peopleenespanol.com/pespanol/cambiatulook where users can upload photos of themselves and try out new celebrity looks in hair and makeup. This technology is the first of its kind within the Hispanic market, where users are experimenting with looks designed for Hispanic women — complete with complimenting hair, skin and eye colors.

Cambia Tu Look is a free, fun, easy way to try on hundreds of the hottest celebrity hairdos, as well as lip, skin and eye colors – all in an instant. For the ultimate transformations, users can try on the complete hair-and-makeup looks of their favorite American and Latino stars such as Angelina Jolie, Jennifer Lopez, Thalia, Katie Holmes and Maite Peroni, and learn how to the exact glamorous red-carpet looks. PeopleEnEspanol.com worked with leading celebrity beauty experts to provide users with step-by-step tips on how to achieve these sexy, modern celebrity looks.

Users can try out over 100 celebrity hairstyles and experiment with hair, lip and eye colors from more than 100 popular brands, then purchase these favorite beauty items online by clicking through to a retailer.

“PeopleEnEspanol.com is the ultimate Hispanic website for the hottest trends in celebrity fashion and beauty,” says Fran Hauser, President, Digital, Time Inc. Style and Entertainment Group. “With Cambia Tu Look we are providing an exciting, engaging experience for women where they can sample with new looks and shop for their favorite beauty brands.”

“Beauty and style are defining characteristics for Latinas,” says Lucia Ballas-Traynor, publisher, People en Espanol. “They have been following the hottest trends of today’s stars but now they can be inspired by creating their own unique looks and styles that differentiate them from mainstream.”

The makeover tool was designed and created in partnership with TAAZ, a San Diego-based technology company.

Source: People en Espanol

Characteristics of Hispanic Millennials

Characteristics of Hispanic Millennials

Characteristics of Hispanic Millennials

In terms of population size, Millennials are already reshaping the ethnic makeup of the Unites States. According to recent figures from the 2008 Current Population Survey, 44 percent of those born since the beginning of the 80’s belong to some racial or ethnic category other than “non-Hispanic white”. Millennials are revealing themselves to be the demographic precursor to Census Bureau projections showing whites as a minority by 2050: only 56 percent of Millennials are white (non-Hispanic) and only 28 percent of current Baby Boomers who are non-white. Therefore we can say that the younger the group, the higher the proportion of “ethnic” populations.

Characteristics of the Hispanic Millennials

Hispanics are at the forefront of this Millennial diversity:

  • – over 20 percent of Millennials are Hispanics
  • – approximately 86 percent of Hispanics under the age of 18 are born in the U.S. (95 percent of Millennials are U.S. born)
  • – many Hispanic Millennials are the offspring of immigrants
  • – unlike their immigrant parents, this group strongly exhibits a preference for English as their primary mode of communication – this poses an interesting challenge when targeting this group because of the importance of family opinions
  • – 88 percent of second generation Hispanics and 94 percent of third generation Hispanics are highly English fluent (speak “very well”). Many second generation Hispanics tend to be bilingual, but English dominates by the third generation. (Source: Pew Hispanic Center)
    A distinguishing characteristic of multi-ethnic Millennials is their heavily “second generation” orientation (nearly 30 percent are children of immigrants). Since they are more likely children of immigrants than immigrants themselves, the proportion of foreign born Millennials is relatively small when compared to Generation Xers and Baby Boomers. Foreign-born persons comprise 13 percent of all Millennials (includes all those born since the 80s), but they make up 22 percent of the Generation X cohort (born between 1965 to 1979) and 16 percent of Baby Boomers (born between 1946 and 1964).

Hispanics born in the U.S. can be grouped into two distinct marketing segments

a- the young “millennial” Latinos, children, teens, and young adults born to immigrant parents

b- “traditional Latinos” or those born to Latino families that have been U.S. citizens for two or more generations

The first ones know how to live in both cultures and enjoy doing so. For the second segment, and depending on the market, the levels of value orientation and acculturation vary drastically.  They may be far removed from the Latino culture or their identity as Hispanics can be much more traditional and stronger than expected.

Perhaps more astounding is the casual mix-and-match cultural sensibilities of Millennials. Not content to cleave to any single ethnic or cultural influence, they are free to engage in the variety with no restrictions. One example is “Mashups”—entire compositions reconfigured from samples drawn from disparate musical genres—so popular on mp3 players. Millennial choices in popular culture are drawn from a broad pool of influences, and anything can be customized and suited to one’s personal preferences—just as easily as an iPod playlist. Likewise, the aesthetics of Millennial fashion, movies, and video games increasingly reflect a broad range of influences—from Japanese anime to East L.A. graffiti art.
Today’s young consumer shun direct overtures aimed at appealing to their ethnic background and they tend to discard traditional cultural labels in favor of their own self-created monikers like “Mexipino”, “Blaxican”, “China Latina”.

As a market segment, Millennials are shaking the foundations of advertising and media. Enabled by technology, their lifestyle is characterized by instant text messaging, mobile media, and virtual social networking. Millennials Hispanics are 211% more likely to download content from the Internet than the general population. Over 60% of Hispanic Millennials are online.
Downloads just might be the manner in which Hispanics are attaining and interacting with certain brands for the first time. For example, downloading may be a preferred method to receive media content including local and national news. This is exemplary of a larger phenomena occurring across the youth culture, as people in younger age brackets go online for content typically associated with more ‘traditional’ media, such as movies or television.  Media content providers and marketers have an opportunity to leverage downloading habits and create content that engages Hispanic Millennials and other Hispanics online.

by Claudia “Havi” Goffan

Accessing of social networking sites or blogs also saw significant growth, increasing 2.6 percentage points to 20.8 percent of mobile subscribers.
Intelligent Technologies You Should Know About
Social Media Network Dashboard Sets New Benchmark for Collections
U.S. Census Facts for Features: Hispanic Heritage Month 2009
Study highlights snacking differences between Hispanics, general population

‘Cambia Tu Look’ PeopleEnEspanol.com Interactive Tool

Innovative Interactive Tool Allows for Uploading Photos, Trying on Celebrity Hair and Makeup Looks, Plus Click-to-Buy Products

-First Hispanic Website to Offer Beauty Tool for Hispanic Consumers-

-T-Mobile Premiere Sponsor-

Further expanding on its celebrity style coverage online, PeopleEnEspanol.com today launched a new interactive tool, http://www.peopleenespanol.com/pespanol/cambiatulook where users can upload photos of themselves and try out new celebrity looks in hair and makeup. This technology is the first of its kind within the Hispanic market, where users are experimenting with looks designed for Hispanic women — complete with complimenting hair, skin and eye colors.

Cambia Tu Look is a free, fun, easy way to try on hundreds of the hottest celebrity hairdos, as well as lip, skin and eye colors – all in an instant. For the ultimate transformations, users can try on the complete hair-and-makeup looks of their favorite American and Latino stars such as Angelina Jolie, Jennifer Lopez, Thalia, Katie Holmes and Maite Peroni, and learn how to the exact glamorous red-carpet looks. PeopleEnEspanol.com worked with leading celebrity beauty experts to provide users with step-by-step tips on how to achieve these sexy, modern celebrity looks.

Users can try out over 100 celebrity hairstyles and experiment with hair, lip and eye colors from more than 100 popular brands, then purchase these favorite beauty items online by clicking through to a retailer.

“PeopleEnEspanol.com is the ultimate Hispanic website for the hottest trends in celebrity fashion and beauty,” says Fran Hauser, President, Digital, Time Inc. Style and Entertainment Group. “With Cambia Tu Look we are providing an exciting, engaging experience for women where they can sample with new looks and shop for their favorite beauty brands.”

“Beauty and style are defining characteristics for Latinas,” says Lucia Ballas-Traynor, publisher, People en Espanol. “They have been following the hottest trends of today’s stars but now they can be inspired by creating their own unique looks and styles that differentiate them from mainstream.”

The makeover tool was designed and created in partnership with TAAZ, a San Diego-based technology company.

Source: People en Espanol

Characteristics of Hispanic Millennials

Characteristics of Hispanic Millennials

Characteristics of Hispanic Millennials

In terms of population size, Millennials are already reshaping the ethnic makeup of the Unites States. According to recent figures from the 2008 Current Population Survey, 44 percent of those born since the beginning of the 80’s belong to some racial or ethnic category other than “non-Hispanic white”. Millennials are revealing themselves to be the demographic precursor to Census Bureau projections showing whites as a minority by 2050: only 56 percent of Millennials are white (non-Hispanic) and only 28 percent of current Baby Boomers who are non-white. Therefore we can say that the younger the group, the higher the proportion of “ethnic” populations.

Characteristics of the Hispanic Millennials

Hispanics are at the forefront of this Millennial diversity:

  • – over 20 percent of Millennials are Hispanics
  • – approximately 86 percent of Hispanics under the age of 18 are born in the U.S. (95 percent of Millennials are U.S. born)
  • – many Hispanic Millennials are the offspring of immigrants
  • – unlike their immigrant parents, this group strongly exhibits a preference for English as their primary mode of communication – this poses an interesting challenge when targeting this group because of the importance of family opinions
  • – 88 percent of second generation Hispanics and 94 percent of third generation Hispanics are highly English fluent (speak “very well”). Many second generation Hispanics tend to be bilingual, but English dominates by the third generation. (Source: Pew Hispanic Center)
    A distinguishing characteristic of multi-ethnic Millennials is their heavily “second generation” orientation (nearly 30 percent are children of immigrants). Since they are more likely children of immigrants than immigrants themselves, the proportion of foreign born Millennials is relatively small when compared to Generation Xers and Baby Boomers. Foreign-born persons comprise 13 percent of all Millennials (includes all those born since the 80s), but they make up 22 percent of the Generation X cohort (born between 1965 to 1979) and 16 percent of Baby Boomers (born between 1946 and 1964).

Hispanics born in the U.S. can be grouped into two distinct marketing segments

a- the young “millennial” Latinos, children, teens, and young adults born to immigrant parents

b- “traditional Latinos” or those born to Latino families that have been U.S. citizens for two or more generations

The first ones know how to live in both cultures and enjoy doing so. For the second segment, and depending on the market, the levels of value orientation and acculturation vary drastically.  They may be far removed from the Latino culture or their identity as Hispanics can be much more traditional and stronger than expected.

Perhaps more astounding is the casual mix-and-match cultural sensibilities of Millennials. Not content to cleave to any single ethnic or cultural influence, they are free to engage in the variety with no restrictions. One example is “Mashups”—entire compositions reconfigured from samples drawn from disparate musical genres—so popular on mp3 players. Millennial choices in popular culture are drawn from a broad pool of influences, and anything can be customized and suited to one’s personal preferences—just as easily as an iPod playlist. Likewise, the aesthetics of Millennial fashion, movies, and video games increasingly reflect a broad range of influences—from Japanese anime to East L.A. graffiti art.
Today’s young consumer shun direct overtures aimed at appealing to their ethnic background and they tend to discard traditional cultural labels in favor of their own self-created monikers like “Mexipino”, “Blaxican”, “China Latina”.

As a market segment, Millennials are shaking the foundations of advertising and media. Enabled by technology, their lifestyle is characterized by instant text messaging, mobile media, and virtual social networking. Millennials Hispanics are 211% more likely to download content from the Internet than the general population. Over 60% of Hispanic Millennials are online.
Downloads just might be the manner in which Hispanics are attaining and interacting with certain brands for the first time. For example, downloading may be a preferred method to receive media content including local and national news. This is exemplary of a larger phenomena occurring across the youth culture, as people in younger age brackets go online for content typically associated with more ‘traditional’ media, such as movies or television.  Media content providers and marketers have an opportunity to leverage downloading habits and create content that engages Hispanic Millennials and other Hispanics online.

by Claudia “Havi” Goffan

Accessing of social networking sites or blogs also saw significant growth, increasing 2.6 percentage points to 20.8 percent of mobile subscribers.
Intelligent Technologies You Should Know About
Social Media Network Dashboard Sets New Benchmark for Collections
U.S. Census Facts for Features: Hispanic Heritage Month 2009
Study highlights snacking differences between Hispanics, general population

Aflac Launches ‘Soccer’ – Its 8th New Television Ad for 2009

National Campaign Focuses on Family and Financial Security

Aflac launches TV commercial for Hispanics

Aflac launches TV commercial for Hispanics

Aflac today unveiled its eighth new television commercial of 2009, titled “Soccer.” This commercial showcases the Aflac Duck as the web-footed star of the team, who helps provide a solid defense against unexpected medical bills. “Soccer” will debut on August 24, running nationally on CBS, ABC, FOX, NBC, CNN, CNBC, Discover Channel, USA, Headline News and the History Channel.

Aflac Launches ‘Soccer’ – Its Eighth New Television Ad for 2009

“Soccer” presents two mothers, one of whom is using crutches, chatting about insurance while watching their kids play soccer. Soaring acrobatically in and out of frame, the Aflac Duck protects the mothers from harm while letting them know that it is Aflac that pays cash when someone is sick or hurt.

After bending one like Beckham to score a gravity-defying goal, the Aflac Duck celebrates with a victory dance while singing “Aflac, Aflac, Aflaaaac,” much to the surprise of one familiar fan.

“Aflac protects families during uncertain times and ‘Soccer’ drives that point home in a way that will resonate with consumers,” Jeff Charney, Aflac senior vice president and chief marketing officer (CMO) said. “We combined the classic family activity — the Saturday morning soccer game — with the Aflac Duck’s unmatched brand of humor, to effectively remind people that Aflac has you under our wing.”

This is the 46th commercial starring the Aflac Duck and marks the first time Aflac has introduced eight television ads in a single year. The corporate spokesduck is a well-known fundraiser for pediatric cancer-related causes and was named to the Advertising Walk of Fame in 2004. On January 1, 2010, the Aflac Duck will mark its 10th birthday as the company celebrates its 55th year serving American consumers.

Source: Aflac

Effort to Improve Diabetes Self Management and Care

Community-based Approach Aims to Improve Diabetes Self Management and Care

AADE, Emory University and Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Institute Partner to Educate and Improve Access to Care for Atlanta-area Minorities with Diabetes

The American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) today announced the launch of an Atlanta-based program aimed at improving self-management of diabetes among minority populations. In partnership with Emory University’s Latino Diabetes Education Program and the Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Institute, the program aims to advance diabetes education in Hispanic and African American populations and to improve clinical and behavioral outcomes. The announcement was made at the Association’s annual meeting.

The program will be offered in the Chamblee neighborhood, which is served by the North DeKalb Health Clinic. The clinic is part of the satellite neighborhood network of clinics of Grady Health System in the Metro Atlanta area. Emory’s Latino Diabetes Education Program is already serving the Latino community in this area, and will partner with Grady and AADE to implement this minority-specific model.

The “Increasing Access to Diabetes Self-Management Education as a Means of Decreasing Health Disparities in Minority Populations” project aims to:

  • Ensure high quality and culturally appropriate services for people with diabetes by involving different members of the disease management team including: physicians, educators, health promoters/community health workers and other health care professionals.
  • Teach the basics of diabetes self management to populations often lacking in education and community-focused support.
  • Build upon local program capacity to achieve desired clinical and behavioral outcomes.

Individuals from minority communities that participate in this program will receive support and tools that will empower them to:

  • Improve their health and clinical outcomes.
  • Change behaviors, set goals and gain problem solving and healthy coping skills.
  • Learn how to navigate the health care system to increase adherence to evidence-based guidelines and reduce high-cost emergency department utilization.

“This program is unique in that it promotes a team approach to diabetes care. Each member of the team — physician, diabetes educator and community health worker — supports and builds upon one another’s work,” said AADE President Marcia Draheim, RN, CDE. “Success will be measured by many factors including clinical improvements, behavioral outcomes, participation and patient satisfaction with the program.”

Emory University School of Medicine and Grady Health System have been serving Latinos with diabetes through the Emory Latino Diabetes Education Program. “The program started over three years ago and has reached more than 750 Latinos with diabetes and their families,” said Amparo Gonzalez, RN, CDE, director of the program. “This grant offers the opportunity to apply the successes and experiences that the Emory Latino Diabetes Education has had had with Latino community to the African American community.”

The program is sponsored through a grant from the Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Institute.

Facts about Diabetes in Minority Populations

Diabetes disproportionately affects minority individuals, who comprise a significant segment of the U.S. population. For example, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, Latinos represent the United States’ largest minority group making up 14.8% of the population or 43 million people.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

  • Non-Hispanic whites: 14.9 million, or 9.8% of all non-Hispanic whites aged 20 years or older, have diabetes.
  • Non-Hispanic blacks: 3.7 million, or 14.7% of all non-Hispanic blacks aged 20 years or older, have diabetes.

Moreover, health disparities are increasing in the U.S. Individuals in African American and Hispanic neighborhoods, in particular, face many barriers to achieving successful self-management of their diabetes. These barriers are attributable to structural factors (e.g., lack of sidewalks or access to food stores with affordable produce) as well as the cultural, socio-economic, and literacy characteristics of the people living there.

About the AADE

Founded in 1973, AADE was created by and for diabetes educators. We are dedicated to providing our members with the tools, training and support necessary to help patients change their behavior and accomplish their diabetes self-management goals.

As a multidisciplinary professional association, AADE represents and supports the diabetes educator by providing members the resources to stay abreast of the current research, methods and trends in the field and by offering opportunities to network and collaborate with other healthcare professionals. AADE is continuously working towards our vision of successful self-management for all people with diabetes and related conditions.

About the Emory Latino Diabetes Education Program

The Emory Latino Diabetes Education Program is a non-profit program aimed to provide diabetes education and lifestyle intervention to Latinos in Georgia. The program began in December 2005 and was accredited by the American Association of Diabetes Educators in 2008. It is the first nationally accredited all-Spanish diabetes education program.

About the Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Institute

The Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Institute is a global initiative that provides health care professionals with access to the latest information and skills training to deliver quality care at the community level, and do so in a care model that facilitates early glucose control and appropriate follow-up. Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Institute aims to be a catalyst for diabetes innovation, improved care and better outcomes worldwide through educational programs.

Source: The American Association of Diabetes Educators

Levelup.com Breaks the Alexa Top 2,000 Sites in the World

Busca Corp announced today that on Sunday July 19th Levelup.com –www.levelup.com) our flagship site and an integral part of the Busca Corp Network — has cracked Alexa’s Top 2,000 sites in the world. With over 10 million total network page views, Levelup.com has transformed into one of the top sites in Mexico and Latin America.

“The growth of Levelup.com is a testament to the 60 Billion Dollar Video Game market,” says Ramon Toledo, President of Busca Corp Media Network. “Through our partnership with Prodigy MSN we are well positioned as the #1 Video Game Site for the Latin American and U.S. Hispanic audience.”

Prodigy MSN is the most popular website in Mexico with over 23 million users and features a wide array of world-class services, such as Windows Live Hotmail, Windows Live Messenger, as well as video, news, and the latest in entertainment, lifestyle and sports. Our partnership aims to target the rapidly expanding video game user base which in the 1980’s meant mostly males under the age of 20 but today includes both male and female gamers under the age of 35.

Levelup.com publishes user-generated video game content alongside professionally produced media content that offers tips, strategies, reviews, comments and a place to share experiences with a fully engaged online community. With its unique platform, Levelup.com has experienced strong and steady growth since its launch in 2007.

Levelup.com also recently entered, and is aggressively attacking, the U.S. Hispanic Market and, is opening a largely untapped demographic with huge potential.

Source: Busca Corp

Targeting Latin Americans

Wyncrest’s Insurance and Financial Division to Rapidly Expand Into Latin American Market

The Wyncrest Group, Inc., a niche insurance consortium, announces its position to rapidly enter the Latin American market. Wyncrest’s pending acquisition of Florida Insurance Consulting Inc. will provide an important key to our growth in the Latin American markets. With the huge growth of the Spanish speaking population in the U.S., many markets are underrepresented and many families and businesses need an insurance and financial services provider.

As recently stated in our previous press release, Southwest Financial Group has been in talks with other Insurance and Financial services companies in Broward Country, Florida that could bring the number of agents in Florida to well over one hundred. This company is also doing roughly $120,000,000.00 in premium insurance and financial sales per year. The company hopes to continue its efforts in recruiting agents and associates from strong family backgrounds with ties to the Latin American communities, Cuba and elsewhere in the Caribbean, as well as South America.

Keith Lanzara, President of the Wyncrest Group, pointed out, “America is more Latin than ever before, and the language and cultural differences that exist must be overcome if Wyncrest Group’s growth strategy in the Latin insurance industry is to be successful. Wyncrest Group’s subsidiary Southwest Financial Group welcomes the opportunity to form synergies with Florida Insurance Consulting and to develop additional business in the Latin American community.”

Targeting Latin Americans

This demographic seems to be the most sought after by insurers. Hispanics represent the largest minority group in the United States with 44.3 million or 14.8% of the population. Latin Americans are also the fastest growing minority group and account for nearly half (1.4 million) the national population growth from 2005 to 2006. In U.S. history, there has never been an immigrant group that has grown to its current size while continuing to maintain its language, cultural values and traditions This makes Latin Americans a sizeable target for marketers in all industries.

The relatively young Hispanic population, entering the workforce for the first time or moving up their individual career ladders, are seeking additional gains in buying power. This will be even more important in this decade than in the 1990s. The increasing number of Latin Americans who have successfully started and expanded their own businesses is another potent force powering the growth of this consumer market, as evidenced by the 1.2 million Hispanic-owned firms in the U.S.

Health insurance providers and hospitals have traveled online to help build their brands with Latino audiences. At the same time tax preparation and accounting services continues to grow when it comes to the total dollars invested in Spanish-language media.

Source: Wyncrest

Walden University Launches Online Degree in Spanish

Extends access to higher education for Spanish-dominant adults. Walden University Launches Degree Taught in Spanish, Delivered Online; Offers Tuition Success Award

MINNEAPOLIS, July 29 /PRNewswire/ –Walden University has launched an online B.S. in Business Administration degree taught in Spanish with the option to learn English. The curriculum is fully delivered in Spanish, and is supported by a full suite of Spanish-language services. Walden’s program is designed to serve those for whom the English-language barrier is an obstacle to a degree from an accredited U.S. university.

Census data show that one-half of the foreign-born population of the United States is Hispanic. Members of the Hispanic community are, in particular, expected to benefit from this program offering.

“The segment of the Latino population that prefers learning and communicating in Spanish has not been well served by U.S. higher education institutions,” said Dr. Ivonne Chirino-Klevans, director of the Spanish-language B.S. in Business Administration program at Walden University. “Walden’s degree program removes the language obstacles preventing many eligible Hispanics from earning a degree. College ready, Spanish-dominant individuals now have a greater opportunity to improve their lives and advance their careers.”

To help provide an opportunity for all eligible students to pursue a degree, Walden has announced it will offer a Walden University Academic Success Award. Open to all students enrolled in the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration program (taught in Spanish with the option to learn English), this award can provide a 15 percent tuition reduction, which equates to between $6,000 and $6,750 over the life of the program*.

Walden’s bachelor’s program provides a full suite of Spanish-language support services, including enrollment and academic advising, writing assistance, tutoring, library resources, technical support, financial and personal counseling, and career services. For those students who want to become English-proficient, Walden offers an optional English-language component (ESL). With the ESL component, students can learn English while earning their degree, and eventually may become eligible to transfer into Walden’s English-language B.S. in Business Administration program. Regardless of the path students choose, upon graduation and with demonstrated proficiency, they may be able to enter Walden’s M.B.A. program.

The program combines academic theory with practical application. The Spanish-language program is designed to achieve the same outcomes as Walden’s English-language B.S. in Business Administration program and prepares students for real-world jobs in a global economy. For example, students will learn how to apply basic business principles to solve problems and leverage domestic and global opportunities; how to use critical thinking and business application skills to make strategic business decisions; how to evaluate the use of technology in a competitive global economy; and how to work effectively across cultures.

Students in the program will communicate in Spanish with other students and faculty members to exchange ideas; discuss key concepts, theories, and issues; practice new skills and strategies; and apply new knowledge to prior experiences.

Walden has long been a champion of the Latino community. In April 2009 The Hispanic Outlook in Higher Educationmagazine ranked Walden University No. 12 on its list of the top 25 colleges and universities with the largest Hispanic graduate student enrollment. The program, targeted to meet the specific and unique needs of the Latino community, is based in Walden’s College of Management and Technology. For the second year in a row, Walden was listed as having the No. 4 largest online graduate management program by enrollment by U.S. News & World Report. Walden is also a part of the Laureate International Universities network, with sister universities located across eight countries in Latin America.

For more informationabout Walden University’s B.S. in Business Administration (taught in Spanish with the option to learn English), visit www.licenciatura.waldenu.edu.

*Award, tuition and fees are for the 2009 – 2010 academic year and are subject to change. The total award amount is dependent upon each student’s transfer of credits and prior learning assessment totals. This award cannot be combined with any other Walden scholarship or tuition reduction offer. Not valid to Tennessee residents.

About Walden University

Since 1970, Walden University has supported working professionals in achieving their academic goals and making a greater impact in their professions and their communities. Today, more than 33,000 students from all 50 states and more than 90 countries are pursuing their bachelor’s, master’s, or doctoral degrees at Walden. The university provides students with an engaging educational experience that connects them with expert faculty and peers around the world. Walden is the flagship online university in the Laureate International Universities network–a global network of 45 online and campus-based universities in 20 countries.

Walden offers more than 36 degree programs with more than 140 specializations and concentrations. Areas of study include: health sciences, counseling, human services, management, psychology, education, public health, nursing, public administration, technology and engineering.

For more information, visit www.WaldenU.edu. Walden University is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association, www.ncahlc.org.

Source: Walden University

Automotive Website Targets Hispanic Car Buyers and Sellers

AutosAhora.com helps Hispanic consumers and dealerships targeting Hispanics to list their cars for sale.

Automotive Website Targets Hispanic Car Buyers and Sellers

Automotive Website Targets Hispanic Car Buyers and Sellers

AutosAhora.com, the one-stop online resource for Hispanic new and used car buyers now offers consumers and dealerships the ability to sell their cars online. Consumers can list their cars for sale on the site for free for thirty days, and dealerships can upload extensive inventory for a low monthly fee. AutosAhora.com allows consumers and dealerships alike, to manage their offers and listings with a simple interface and allows dealerships to personalize their ads to reinforce their brand image at the local and national level.

Automotive Website Targets Hispanic Car Buyers and Sellers

AutosAhora.com is one of the few comprehensive online resources that allows Hispanics to shop for a car, sell a car and obtain financing entirely in English and Spanish. AutosAhora.com also features articles on the new government sponsored “Cash for Clunkers” program and calculators that help consumers understand how much they can afford.

Source: AutosAhora.com

ViveMejor Summer Tips for You and Your Family!

Beauty expert Leonardo Rocco and Chef Marcela Valladolid share their secrets for summer fun on ViveMejor.com!

Summertime is finally here! Now that the kids are out of school, why arrange an expensive family getaway when you can experience a perfect day close to home? By staying close to home you can spend quality time with your loved ones, save money and discover more of your unexplored surroundings. Take full advantage of these perfect summer days with ViveMejor.com, your lifestyle resource. ViveMejor offers you tips on what to do with the family, how to prepare delicious meals that all can enjoy, and offers beauty tips so you can enjoy the summer in style!

Below are some fresh ideas to guide you on how to begin your perfect summer day with an outdoor picnic. Author, mom and Chef Marcela Valladolid offers some recipes that are delicious and affordable, so you can enjoy a fabulous lunch without breaking the bank!

1. Consider making use of your outdoor space this season and start a home garden with your family. Have each of your loved ones choose different things to plant and let your garden come alive! Take a few minutes each morning to weed and water your herbs and vegetables, so you can enjoy them for lunch or dinner once they ripen. Plant some cilantro, a popular herb in Hispanic dishes, and use it to make a Tropical Fruit Dip. This scrumptious appetizer goes wonderfully with papayas or mangoes, and is made with Hellmann’s(R) or Best Foods(R) Light Mayonnaise, providing real taste with half the fat and calories of Real Mayonnaise. Each tablespoon of this amazing dip is just $0.14(i)! By enjoying this treat while waiting for the main course you’re sure to start your lunch off right!!

2. After lunch, head to the beach, and make sure to pack plenty of beach toys to keep the kids busy. As they are enjoying their day in the sun and begin to get thirsty, give them a new and exciting drink like a Lemon Mo-tea- to, which is a great alternative to sodas! It is made with seltzer water, Lipton(R) Lemon Sugar Sweetened Iced Tea Mix and crushed mint leaves, which can also come from your very own home garden! The Lemon Mo-tea-to is quick, easy and full of flavor, so it is a summer refreshment that the whole family will love!

After spending an entire a day outside with your loved ones don’t be afraid to wind down and take some time for yourself after the kids go to bed. Take the opportunity to pamper yourself to make sure you look and feel great! With the summer humidity and rising temperatures, your beauty routine might change and hair and skin may become harder to manage. Luckily, beauty expert and celebrity stylist Leonardo Rocco is ready to share his secrets, tips and advice for looking as fabulous as ever during this season!

1. After a day in the sun, the heat and humidity can cause hair to become dry and damaged, making it harder to control. The key to gorgeous summer hair is moisturization. For salon proven performance without paying the salon price, use Suave Professionals(R) Damage Care Shampoo and Conditioner. This formula helps revitalize damaged hair, giving it a healthy-looking shine that will make other moms jealous! Try not to use blow dryers and straightening irons everyday when styling, as they will cause additional damage to your hair. Instead, try letting it air dry to show off its natural, glossy waves for a care-free look!

2. In addition to causing damage to your hair, spending a lot of time outdoors and in the sun can also wreak havoc on your skin. After cleansing your face at night make sure to keep it moisturized and healthy looking by using Pond’s(R) clarant B3. Besides serving as a great moisturizer, it is proven to even out women’s skin tone by reducing the appearance of dark spots in just 4 weeks You can always feel confident and put your best face forward while enjoying outdoor fun!

3. Finally, to avoid uncomfortable underarm wetness in your summer clothes, apply Dove Clinical Protection(R) at night before bed. Night time gives the unique prescription-strength formula time to work, building a strong level of 24-hour wetness protection that will help you feel confident while you’re out in the sun this summer!

With all these tips from Chef Marcela and Rocco, you are ready to enjoy the summer, eat well and look great while doing it, all at affordable prices! The only thing left to worry about is planning out the next exciting activity for you and your loved ones. Just make sure to enjoy the warm weather while it lasts!

For even more recipes, beauty tips, and money-saving coupons, don’t forget to visit www.ViveMejor.com!

(i) Based on average retail prices at national supermarkets.

About Unilever

Unilever’s mission is to add vitality to life. We meet everyday needs for nutrition, hygiene and personal care with brands that help people feel good, look good and get more out of life. Each day, around the world, consumers make 160 million decisions to purchase Unilever products.

In the United States, the portfolio includes major brand icons such as: Axe, Ben & Jerry’s, Bertolli, Breyers, Caress, Country Crock, Degree, Dove personal care products, Hellmann’s, Klondike, Knorr, Lipton, Popsicle, Promise, Q-Tips, Skippy, Slim-Fast, Suave, Sunsilk and Vaseline. All of the preceding brand names are registered trademarks of the Unilever Group of Companies. Dedicated to serving consumers and the communities where we live, work and play, Unilever employs nearly 12,000 people in both the United States and Puerto Rico — generating nearly $10 billion in sales in 2008. For more information, visit www.unileverusa.com.
Source: ViveMejor.com

What will the U.S. look like in 2050?

U.S. Population Projections: 2005–2050 - What will the U.S. look like in 2050?

U.S. Population Projections: 2005–2050 – What will the U.S. look like in 2050?

U.S. Population Projections: 2005–2050

What will the U.S. look like in 2050? Population and Immigration

Between 2005 and 2050, the nation’s population will increase to 438 million from 296 million, a rise of 142 million people that represents growth of 48%.

Immigrants who arrive after 2005, and their U.S.-born descendants, account for 82% of the projected national population increase during the 2005–2050 period.

Of  the 117 additional people attributable to the effect of new immigration, 67 million will be the immigrants themselves and 50 million will be their U.S.-born children and grandchildren

The nation’s foreign-born population, 36 million in 2005, is projected to rise to 81 million in 2050, growth of 129%.

In 2050, nearly one in five Americans (19%) will be an immigrant, compared with one in eight now (12% in 2005).

• The foreign-born share of the nation’s population will exceed historic highs sometime between 2020 and 2025, when it reaches 15%. The historic peak share was 14.7% in 1910 and 14.8% in 1890.

• Births in the United States will play a growing role in Hispanic and Asian population growth, so a diminishing proportion of both groups will be foreign-born.

What will the U.S. look like in 2050? Racial and Ethnic Groups

• The Hispanic population, 42 million in 2005, will rise to 128 million in 2050, tripling in size. Latinos will be 29% of the population, compared with 14% in 2005. Latinos will account for 60% of the nation’s population growth from 2005 to 2050.

• The black population, 38 million in 2005, will grow to 59 million in 2050, a rise of 56%. In 2050, the nation’s population will be 13.4% black, compared with 12.8% in 2005.

• The Asian population, 14 million in 2005, will grow to 41 million in 2050, nearly tripling in size. In 2050, the nation’s population will be 9% Asian, compared with 5% in 2005. Most Asians in the United States were foreign born in 2005 (58%), but by 2050, fewer than half (47%) will be.

• The white, non-Hispanic population, 199 million in 2005, will grow to 207 million in 2050, a 4% increase. In 2050, 47% of the U.S. population will be non-Hispanic white, compared with 67% in 2005.

What will the U.S. look like in 2050? Age Groups

• The working-age population—adults ages 18 to 64—will reach 255 million in 2050, up from 186 million in 2005. This segment will grow more slowly over the projection period (37%) than the overall population. Future immigrants and their descendants will account for all growth in this group.

• Among working-age adults, the foreign-born share, 15% in 2005, will rise to 23% in 2050. The Hispanic share, 14% in 2005, will increase to 31% in 2050. The non-Hispanic white share, 68% in 2005, will decline to 45% in 2050.

• The nation’s population of children ages 17 and younger will rise to 102 million in 2050, up from 73 million in 2005. The child population will grow more slowly in future decades (39%) than will the overall population. Future immigrants and their descendants will account for all growth in this population segment.

• Among children, the share who are immigrants or who have an immigrant parent will rise to 34% in 2050 from 23% in 2005. The share of children who are Hispanic, 20% in 2005, will rise to 35% in 2050. Non-Hispanic whites, who make up 59% of today’s children, will be 40% of children in 2050.

• The nation’s elderly population— people ages 65 and older—will grow to 81 million in 2050, up from 37 million in 2005. This group will grow more rapidly than the overall population, so its share will increase to 19% in 2050, from 12% in 2005. Immigration will account for only a small part of that growth.

• The dependency ratio—the number of people of working age, compared with the number of young and elderly—will rise sharply, mainly because of growth in the elderly population. There were 59 children and elderly people per 100 adults of working age in 2005. That will rise to 72 dependents per 100 adults of working age in 2050.

What will the U.S. look like in 2050? Alternative Projection Scenarios

• Under a lower-immigration scenario, the total population would rise to 384 million, the foreign-born share would stabilize at 13% and the Hispanic share would go up to 26% in 2050.

• Under a higher-immigration scenario, the total population would rise to 496 million, the foreign-born share would rise to 23% and the Hispanic share would go up to 32% in 2050.

• Under a lower- or higher-immigration scenario, the dependency ratio would range from 75 dependents per 100 people of working age to 69 dependents per 100 people of working age. Both of these ratios are well above the current value of 59 dependents per 100 people of working age.

Estimates of the Unauthorized Immigrant Population 2010 - Pew Hispanic
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Accessing of social networking sites or blogs also saw significant growth, increasing 2.6 percentage points to 20.8 percent of mobile subscribers.

Source: Pew Research Center – 2008