Posts

Mundet, the Wonderful Apple Soft Drink Centenario Promotion

Mundet announces the first winner of its national Centenario promotion — Julissa from Calexico, California. This contest commemorates the 100+- year heritage of Mundet, offering exciting prizes under special gold bottlecaps that can be found on Mundet Manzana Verde (Green Apple) and Sidral (Original Red Apple) Mundet bottles.

Mundet, the delicious apple-based soft drink which has been a part of the Mexican heritage since the early 20th century, is celebrating its 100+-year heritage with an exciting Centenario promotion. Consumers have the opportunity to win exciting instant-win prizes located under special gold bottlecaps found on Mundet Green Apple and Sidral Mundet glass bottles. The grand prizes are Centenarios, Mexican bullion coins created in 1921 to honor the 100-year anniversary of Mexico’s independence from Spain, with an approximate value of $1,500 each. Additional prizes include T-shirts and teddy bears.

The first Centenario prize winner was Julissa from Calexico, CA. The Centenario promotion is national in scope. Consumers still have a chance to win prizes, including more Centenario coins, because the promotion is scheduled to run through May, 2010, or until all prizes are awarded.

Mundet soft drinks are known for their unique and delicious real-apple flavor. Sidral Mundet does not contain any flavoring (natural or artificial), since its unique flavor comes from real apples. Mundet is popular with adults and children, and is considered by many to have health benefits due to its pasteurization process and since it does not contain caffeine. Many Mexican mothers use Mundet as a hydration fluid for their children.

Since 1988, Mundet soft drinks have been distributed in the United States exclusively by Novamex (www.novamex.com). Mundet is currently one of the best-selling Mexican soft drinks in the US. Novamex is a leader in the marketing and distribution of authentic Mexican products in the United States, including Jarritos, Mineragua and Mundet, delicious soft drinks with the great authentic flavor of Mexico. In additional to product sales, marketing and distribution, Novamex provides educational and sports opportunities to children and youth in high-Hispanic markets throughout the United States, and assists hundreds of churches and non-profit organizations through the donation of soft drinks that can be sold for fundraising purposes.
Source: Mundet

New Financial Services Hispanic Marketing Campaign

Fifth Third Bank (Nasdaq: FITB), a diversified financial services company headquartered in Cincinnati, OH, announced this week the launch of its new financial services Hispanic marketing campaign tailored for the growing Hispanic population. The campaign entitled “Las cosas que hacemos por los suenos,” or “The Things We Do for Dreams,” seeks to expand the Bank’s positioning as a trusted financial partner for Hispanics. The creative executions show variations of the “American Dream” such as owning a home or taking a family vacation, along with the Bank’s tips regarding how to make those dreams a reality through proper financial planning.

The campaign began running in April and will appear throughout the year in markets that are part of the Bank’s footprint: Chicago, Orlando, Tampa, Ft. Myers, Naples, Grand Rapids, and Indianapolis. The ads will run in radio, print, Out of Home and online in Spanish language media. Part of the campaign will also be a series of financial workshops and television vignettes providing tips on how to best handle one’s finances during the current economic climate and beyond. A comprehensive public relations push will support all initiatives.

Why a New Financial Services Hispanic Marketing Campaign

“The Hispanic market is a key growth segment for Fifth Third Bank. The goal with this campaign is to inform Hispanic customers about the best ways to keep their finances healthy and growing so they can make their dreams a reality,” said Larry S. Magnesen, Senior Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer.

“Fifth Third Bank just celebrated its 150th anniversary, a testament to the Bank’s strength and heritage. Our campaign seeks to couple that message of trust with a personal connection around Latino insights. At the end, the goal is simple: to get them to see Fifth Third as a partner they can trust,” commented Catherine Nunez Account Director at the vox collective, the full service advertising agency Fifth Third Bank is partnering with for many of its multicultural initiatives.

The campaign pieces can be viewed at: www.thevoxcollective.com/fifththirdbank

Fifth Third Bancorp is a diversified financial services company headquartered in Cincinnati, Ohio. The Company has $119 billion in assets, operates 16 affiliates with 1,318 full-service Banking Centers, including 99 Bank Mart(R) locations open seven days a week inside select grocery stores and 2,354 ATMs in Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana, Michigan, Illinois, Florida, Tennessee, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Missouri, Georgia and North Carolina. Fifth Third operates four main businesses: Commercial Banking, Branch Banking, Consumer Lending, and Investment Advisors. Fifth Third also has a 49% interest in Fifth Third Processing Solutions, LLC. Fifth Third is among the largest money managers in the Midwest and, as of March 31, 2009, had $166 billion in assets under care, of which it managed $23 billion for individuals, corporations and not-for-profit organizations. Investor information and press releases can be viewed at www.53.com. Fifth Third’s common stock is traded on the NASDAQ(R) National Global Select Market under the symbol “FITB.” Fifth Third Bank, Member FDIC.
Source: Fifth Third Bancorp

Hispanic Heritage Month: Sept. 15 – Oct. 15

Origin of the Hispanic Heritage Month

In September 1968, Congress authorized President Lyndon B. Johnson to proclaim National Hispanic Heritage Week, which was observed during the week that included Sept. 15 and Sept. 16. The observance was expanded in 1988 to a month long celebration (Sept. 15 – Oct. 15). America celebrates the culture and traditions of those who trace their roots to Spain, Mexico and the Spanish-speaking nations of Central America, South America and the Caribbean. Sept. 15 was chosen as the starting point for the celebration because it is the anniversary of independence of five Latin American countries: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. In addition, Mexico and Chile celebrate their independence days on Sept. 16 and Sept. 18, respectively.

Population

46.9 million

The estimated Hispanic population of the United States as of July 1, 2008, making people of Hispanic origin the nation’s largest ethnic or race minority. Hispanics constituted 15 percent of the nation’s total population. In addition, there are approximately 4 million residents of Puerto Rico.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html and http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013049.html

More than 1

…of every two people added to the nation’s population between July 1, 2007, and July 1, 2008, was Hispanic. There were 1.5 million Hispanics added to the population during the period.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html

3.2%

Percentage increase in the Hispanic population between July 1, 2007, and July 1, 2008, making Hispanics the fastest-growing minority group.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html

132.8 million

The projected Hispanic population of the United States on July 1, 2050. According to this projection, Hispanics will constitute 30 percent of the nation’s population by that date.

Source: Population projections http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/012496.html

22.4 million

The nation’s Hispanic population during the 1990 Census — less than half the current total.

Source: The Hispanic Population: 2000 http://www.census.gov/prod/2001pubs/c2kbr01-3.pdf

2nd

Ranking of the size of the U.S. Hispanic population worldwide, as of 2008. Only Mexico (110 million) had a larger Hispanic population than the United States (46.9 million).

Source: International Data Base http://www.census.gov/ipc/nas/content/live/hispanic/idbsum.html and population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html

64%

The percentage of Hispanic-origin people in the United States who were of Mexican background in 2007. Another 9 percent were of Puerto Rican background, with 3.5 percent Cuban, 3.1 percent Salvadoran and 2.7 percent Dominican. The remainder were of some other Central American, South American or other Hispanic or Latino origin.

Source: 2007 American Community Surveyhttp://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

About 45 percent of the nation’s Dominicans lived in New York City in 2007 and about half of the nation’s Cubans in Miami-Dade County, Fla.

Source: 2007 American Community Survey http://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

25%

Percentage of children younger than 5 who were Hispanic in 2008. All in all, Hispanics comprised 22 percent of children younger than 18.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html

27.7 years

Median age of the Hispanic population in 2008. This compared with 36.8 years for the population as a whole.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html

107

Number of Hispanic males in 2008 per every 100 Hispanic females. This was in sharp contrast to the overall population, which had 97 males per every 100 females.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html

States and Counties

48%

The percentage of the Hispanic-origin population that lived in California or Texas in 2008. California was home to 13.5 million Hispanics, and Texas was home to 8.9 million.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

16

The number of states with at least a half-million Hispanic residents — Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Massachusetts, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia and Washington.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

45%

The percentage of New Mexico’s population that was Hispanic in 2008, the highest of any state. Hispanics also made up at least one fifth of the population in California and Texas, at 37 percent each, Arizona (30 percent), Nevada (26 percent), Florida (21 percent) and Colorado (20 percent). New Mexico had 891,000 Hispanics.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

The Carolinas

The states with the highest percentage increases in Hispanic population between July 1, 2007, and July 1, 2008. South Carolina’s increase was 7.7 percent and North Carolina’s was 7.4 percent.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

4.7 million

The Hispanic population of Los Angeles County, Calif., in 2008 — the largest of any county in the nation. Los Angeles County also had the biggest numerical increase in the Hispanic population (67,000) since July 2007.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

97%

Proportion of the population of Starr County, Texas, that was Hispanic as of 2008, which led the nation. All of the top 10 counties in this category were in Texas.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

48

Number of the nation’s 3,142 counties that are majority-Hispanic.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

15%

Percent increase in the Hispanic population in Luzerne County, Pa., from July 1, 2007, to July 1, 2008. Among all counties with 2007 Hispanic populations of at least 10,000, Luzerne topped the nation in this category. Luzerne’s county seat is Wilkes-Barre.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

313,000

The increase in California’s Hispanic population between July 1, 2007, and July 1, 2008, which led all states. Texas (305,000) and Florida (111,000) also recorded large increases.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

20

Number of states in which Hispanics are the largest minority group. These states are Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Massachusetts, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, Texas, Utah, Washington and Wyoming.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

Businesses

Source for statements in this section: Hispanic-owned Firms: 2002http://www.census.gov/csd/sbo/hispanic2002.htm

1.6 million

The number of Hispanic-owned businesses in 2002.

Nearly 43 percent of Hispanic-owned firms operated in construction; administrative and support, and waste management and remediation services; and other services, such as personal services, and repair and maintenance. Retail and wholesale trade accounted for nearly 36 percent of Hispanic-owned business revenue.

Counties with the highest number of Hispanic-owned firms were Los Angeles County (188,422); Miami-Dade County (163,187); and Harris County, Texas (61,934).

Triple

The rate of growth of Hispanic-owned businesses between 1997 and 2002 (31 percent) compared with the national average (10 percent) for all businesses.

$222 billion

Revenue generated by Hispanic-owned businesses in 2002, up 19 percent from 1997.

44.6%

…of all Hispanic-owned firms were owned by people of Mexican origin (Mexican, Mexican-American or Chicano).

29,168

Number of Hispanic-owned firms with receipts of $1 million or more.

Families and Children

10.4 million

The number of Hispanic family households in the United States in 2008. Of these households, 62 percent included children younger than 18.

Source: Families and Living Arrangements http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/families_households/013378.html

66%

The percentage of Hispanic family households consisting of a married couple.

Source: Families and Living Arrangements http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/families_households/013378.html

43%

The percentage of Hispanic family households consisting of a married couple with children younger than 18.

Source: Families and Living Arrangements http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/families_households/013378.html

70%

Percentage of Hispanic children living with two parents.

Source: Families and Living Arrangements http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/families_households/013378.html

Spanish Language

35 million

The number of U.S. residents 5 and older who spoke Spanish at home in 2007. Those who hablan espanol constituted 12 percent of U.S. residents. More than half of these Spanish speakers spoke English “very well.”

Source: 2007 American Community Survey http://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

4

Number of states where at least one-in-five residents spoke Spanish at home in 2007 — Arizona, California, New Mexico and Texas.

Source: 2007 American Community Survey http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/american_community_survey_acs/012634.html

78%

Percentage of Hispanics 5 and older who spoke Spanish at home in 2007.

Source: 2007 American Community Surveyhttp://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

Income, Poverty and Health Insurance

$38,679

The median income of Hispanic households in 2007, statistically unchanged from the previous year after adjusting for inflation.

Source: Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2007 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/income_wealth/012528.html

21.5%

The poverty rate among Hispanics in 2007, up from 20.6 percent in 2006.

Source: Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2007 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/income_wealth/012528.html

32.1%

The percentage of Hispanics who lacked health insurance in 2007, down from 34.1 percent in 2006.

Source: Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2007 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/income_wealth/012528.html

Education

53%

The percentage of Hispanic 4-year-olds enrolled in nursery school in 2007, up from 43 percent in 1997 and 21 percent in 1987.

Source: School Enrollment – Social and Economic Characteristics of Students: October 2007http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013391.html

62%

The percentage of Hispanics 25 and older who had at least a high school education in 2008.

Source: Educational Attainment in the United States: 2008 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013618.html

13%

The percentage of the Hispanic population 25 and older with a bachelor’s degree or higher in 2008.

Source: Educational Attainment in the United States: 2008 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013618.html

3.6 million

The number of Hispanics 18 and older who had at least a bachelor’s degree in 2008.

Source: Educational Attainment in the United States: 2008 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013618.html

1 million

Number of Hispanics 25 and older with advanced degrees in 2008 (e.g., master’s, professional, doctorate).

Source: Educational Attainment in the United States: 2008 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013618.html

12%

Percentage of full-time college students (both undergraduate and graduate students) in October 2007 who were Hispanic, up from 10 percent in 2006.

Source: School Enrollment – Social and Economic Characteristics of Students: October 2007 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013391.html

20%

Percentage of elementary and high school students combined who were Hispanic.

Source: School Enrollment – Social and Economic Characteristics of Students: October 2007 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013391.html

Names

4

The number of Hispanic surnames ranked among the 15 most common in 2000. It was the first time that a Hispanic surname reached the top 15 during a census. Garcia was the most frequent Hispanic surname, occurring 858,289 times and placing eighth on the list — up from 18th in 1990. Rodriguez (ninth), Martinez (11th) and Hernandez (15th) were the next most common Hispanic surnames.

Source: Census 2000 Genealogy http://www.census.gov/genealogy/nas/content/live/hispanic/freqnames2k.html

Jobs

67%

Percentage of Hispanics 16 and older who were in the civilian labor force in 2007.

Source: 2007 American Community Survey http://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

18%

The percentage of Hispanics 16 or older who worked in management, professional and related occupations in 2007. The same percentage worked in production, transportation and material moving occupations. Another 16 percent worked in construction, extraction, maintenance and repair occupations. Approximately 24 percent of Hispanics 16 or older worked in service occupations; 21 percent in sales and office occupations; and 2 percent in farming, fishing and forestry occupations.

Source: 2007 American Community Survey http://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

79,400

Number of Hispanic chief executives. In addition, 50,866 physicians and surgeons; 48,720 postsecondary teachers; 38,532 lawyers; and 2,726 news analysts, reporters and correspondents are Hispanic.

Source: Upcoming Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2010, Table 603 http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/

Voting

5.6 million

The number of Hispanic citizens who reported voting in the 2006 congressional elections. The percentage of Hispanic citizens voting — about 32 percent — did not change statistically from four years earlier.

Source: Voting and Registration in the Election of November 2006 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/voting/012234.html

Serving our Country

1.1 million

The number of Hispanic veterans of the U.S. armed forces.

Source: 2007 American Community Survey http://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

Following is a list of observances typically covered by the Census Bureau’s Facts for Features series:
African-American History Month (February) Labor Day
Super Bowl Grandparents Day
Valentine’s Day (Feb. 14) Hispanic Heritage Month
Women’s History Month (March) (Sept. 15-Oct. 15)
Irish-American Heritage Month (March)/ Unmarried and Single
St. Patrick’s Day (March 17) Americans Week
Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month (May) Halloween (Oct. 31)
Older Americans Month (May) American Indian/Alaska
Cinco de Mayo (May 5) Native Heritage Month
Mother’s Day (November)
Father’s Day Veterans Day (Nov. 11)
The Fourth of July (July 4) Thanksgiving Day
Anniversary of Americans with The Holiday Season
Disabilities Act (July 26) (December)
Back to School (August)
Editor’s note: The preceding data were collected from a variety of sources and may be subject to sampling variability and other sources of error. Facts for Features are customarily released about two months before an observance in order to accommodate magazine production timelines. Questions or comments should be directed to the Census Bureau’s Public Information Office: telephone: 301-763-3030; fax: 301-763-3762; or e-mail: pio@census.gov.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau

Publix tries to appeal to Hispanic market in Georgia

Hispanic buying power in Georgia has grown by 1037% since 1990, No wonder Publix tries to appeal to Hispanic market in Georgia!

Norcross store gets makeover with focus on items from Mexico

“Do you have the sombrero? Has it arrived yet?”

It’s not the kind of question a grocery store manager overseeing the final details of a renovation would normally expect from a contractor. But for Marco Guillen, it’s just all in a day’s work.

Guillen is the point man on Publix Super Markets newest experiment — the first store outside of the company’s home turf in Florida designed to appeal to Hispanic shoppers.

The store, located in a heavily Hispanic neighborhood that Census records show is predominantly Mexican in origin, features bilingual signs and shelves stocked with more than 1,500 new Mexican and Central American items brought into the store in recent months.

Where Hispanic foods were once isolated in a single aisle, they’re now spread throughout the store. Dried guajillo chiles are piled up in a box in the produce section. Jarritos soft drinks take up shelf space near Coke and Pepsi products. Foca powder detergent is near the Tide. Colorful pinatas are scattered throughout.

“We really had to go out and challenge our suppliers to go out and get us items that are traditionally Mexican. Not Mexican-American, but Mexican,” said the company’s Atlanta spokeswoman, Brenda Reid.

The store also features a salsa bar, deli items meant to appeal to the Hispanic palate and an expanded number of Western Union terminals, popular with Hispanic immigrants sending money home. About half of its employees are bilingual, recruited from Publix stores all over metro Atlanta, Reid said.

The store has been slowly rolling out the changes for months. It formally debuts Thursday with a grand opening featuring a mariachi band and other festivities.

The effort is rooted in rising Hispanic buying power and increasing competition from ethnic groceries that cater to the fast-growing Hispanic and Asian communities, Reid said.

Hispanic buying power in Georgia has grown by 1037 percent since 1990, outstripping the 194 percent growth for the overall market by more than five times, according to the Selig Center for Economic Growth at the University of Georgia.

Hispanics now account for 5.1 percent of Georgia’s buying power and are projected to outpace the growth by all other ethnic groups, according to the center.

A spokesman for Kroger, metro Atlanta’s leading grocer, said his company hasn’t explicity labeled any one store to appeal to a specific demographic. But Glynn Jenkins said the company adjusts each store’s product mix to appeal to local tastes.

Publix tries to appeal to Hispanic market in Georgia

Guillen said the changes at his store have gone over well with both Hispanic and non-Hispanic customers. The store’s bright new color palette and the fact that the store only eliminated a handful of unpopular items to make way for its new Hispanic product mix continues to bring in customers of all stripes, he said.

Source: The Atlanta Journal-Constitution – Michael Pearson

Making of the commercial Toyota Highlander

I wanted to share the making of a 2007 commercial for the Puerto Rican market. The shoot took place in a city far, far away – in my beloved Buenos Aires.

Producer: Landia
Dir : Karina Minujin / Maxi Blanco
Asist de Dir :Ezequiel Avaro
Jefe Prod. : Guada Tellado
D.F. : Marcelo Camorino
Dir de Arte : Natalia Grosso

The main message is about changes and how we adapt to things, in this case how the Toyota Highlander adapts to us. And this is how it plays in Puerto Rico.

The Toyota Highlander commercial

First, watch the commercial:

Making of the commercial Toyota Highlander

Now, the making of the commercial for Toyota Highlander with the polar bear animatronics head:

Marketing Message Horribly Gone Awry

Don’t allow this to happen to your marketing messages!!!!

The English is clear enough to lorry drivers - but the Welsh reads "I am not in the office at the moment. Send any work to be translated."

The English is clear enough to lorry drivers – but the Welsh reads “I am not in the office at the moment. Send any work to be translated.”

When officials asked for the Welsh translation of a road sign, they thought the reply was what they needed.
Unfortunately, the e-mail response to Swansea council said in Welsh: “I am not in the office at the moment. Send any work to be translated”.
So that was what went up under the English version which barred lorries from a road near a supermarket.
“When they’re proofing signs, they should really use someone who speaks Welsh,” said journalist Dylan Iorwerth.
Swansea Council became lost in translation when it was looking to halt heavy goods vehicles using a road near an Asda store in the Morriston area.
All official road signs in Wales are bilingual, so the local authority e-mailed its in-house translation service for the Welsh version of: “No entry for heavy goods vehicles. Residential site only”.
The reply duly came back and officials set the wheels in motion to create the large sign in both languages.

The notice went up and all seemed well – until Welsh speakers began pointing out the embarrassing error.
Welsh-language magazine Golwg was promptly sent photographs of the offending sign by a number of its readers.
Managing editor Mr Iorwerth said: “We’ve been running a series of these pictures over the past months.
“They’re circulating among Welsh speakers because, unfortunately, it’s all too common that things are not just badly translated, but are put together by people who have no idea about the language.
“It’s good to see people trying to translate, but they should really ask for expert help.
“Everything these days seems to be written first in English and then translated.
“Ideally, they should be written separately in both languages.”

A council spokeswoman said: “Our attention was drawn to the mistranslation of a sign at the junction of Clase Road and Pant-y-Blawd Road.

Other confusing signs

“We took it down as soon as we were made aware of it and a correct sign will be re-instated as soon as possible.”
The blunder is not the only time Welsh has been translated incorrectly or put in the wrong place:

  • Cyclists between Cardiff and Penarth in 2006 were left confused by a bilingual road sign telling them they had problems with an “inflamed bladder”.
  • In the same year, a sign for pedestrians in Cardiff reading ‘Look Right’ in English read ‘Look Left’ in Welsh.
  • In 2006, a shared-faith school in Wrexham removed a sign which translated Welsh for staff as “wooden stave”.
  • Football fans at a FA Cup tie between Oldham and Chasetown – two English teams – in 2005 were left scratching their heads after a Welsh-language hoarding was put up along the pitch. It should have gone to a match in Merthyr Tydfil.
  • People living near an Aberdeenshire building site in 2006 were mystified when a sign apologising for the inconvenience was written in Welsh as well as English.

It’s good to see people trying to translate but they should really ask for expert help

There's still time to change the road you're on - Led Zep

There’s still time to change the road you’re on – Led Zep

Source:BBC

New, Personalized Spanish Story Book for Children

I happened upon this product and thought it was incredible. You have to try it for yourself at www.frecklebox.com and then select spanish (soft or hard cover) but keep on reading….

Santa Clara, CA (PRWEB) December 11, 2008 — Frecklebox, provider of personalized gifts for kids, announced today that it has officially launched its first Spanish product, a story book that includes an individual child’s name in a collection of nature settings. In the near future, Frecklebox plans to continue to expand its line of personalized Spanish story book and gifts.

Frecklebox lets customers experience the magic of image personalization. Everyone has seen books with a child’s name in text, but nothing beats the expression on a child’s face when they see their name spelled in actual images of clouds, flowers, stars, pigeons and more. Through its web site, frecklebox.com, the company makes it quick and easy to customize gifts that prominently feature the child’s name.

“We created Frecklebox as a way for people to give gifts that are as wonderfully unique as the child they are buying the gift for,” said Scott Feldman, president of Frecklebox. “The fact that we have been able to expand our product line into Spanish, is helping us meet a need for many of our customers looking for the perfect present in their native language.”

Frecklebox personalized spanish story book products include:

  • Story books – The Nature Name Book (available in English and Spanish), The Zoo Book, Hip Hop Howie, Happy Birthday and The Unicorn
  • Coloring books – Five different options make these popular as fun and affordable party favors
  • Posters, placemats and puzzles – Reasonably priced gifts for any occasion
  • Growth charts – A practical product that adds fashionable décor to any style room

About Frecklebox:
Frecklebox, headquartered in Santa Clara, California, was created with the mission to educate and entertain kids through a wide selection of personalized books, posters, journals and other products. Frecklebox is an online-only source for truly unique, personalized gifts for children at affordable prices.

For more information about Frecklebox and their products, please visit frecklebox.com.

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If I don't sleep, nobody sleeps.

If I don’t sleep, nobody sleeps.

Source: http://www.prweb.com/pingpr.php/RW1wdC1QaWdnLVRoaXItTWFnbi1aZXRhLVNpbmctWmVybw==

5 company mishaps in Spanish Language by Sandra Bravo

by Claudia Ahaviah Goffan

TL: Can you give us examples of company mishaps when it comes to the Spanish language, which ones come to mind?
Sandra: Hewlett Packard caused some controversy in Argentina when they introduced their products in that market. Their logo bears only the initials “HP”, and to an Argentine, it translates into the abbreviation for “Son of a #@%#”

Have you heard of the Mazda Laputa (the streetwalker, to put it mildly) or the Nissan Moco (mucus) or the Mitsubishi Pajero (this one is too strong to translate in a public medium) later renamed Montero? Do you wonder why these names are culturally offensive in Spanish? If you are still in doubt, ask your best Latino friend…

5 company mishaps when it comes to the Spanish language

5 company mishaps when it comes to the Spanish language

Ignoring culturally appropriate contexts can get your company into some trouble. For example, some Muslim countries banned Pokemon in 2001 because cards apparently contained some “Zionist” symbols. Or Google, that received a complaint from the Government of Taiwan when the map engine identified the country as a “province of China.”

TL: Can you tell me when companies have done it right and why?
Sandra: One of the many reasons why I love to bank at Washington Mutual is the way they reach at the Hispanic community. It is not just the fact that they have tellers who are bilingual. Most importantly, the translation of their marketing materials clearly reflects the Latino culture. It is about diversity. It is about communicating with clients in their own language – and very well written, by the way!

Another company that has embraced diversity is Comcast. The dynamic and upbeat style of their promotional flyers in Spanish, for example, is very eye-catching. Comcast has found out a way to reach the Latino market. Why? Because they understand it is not just getting the language right, but rather the culture. Comcast ads speak about family, kids and parents and time for friends.

TL: What’s the difference between translation and transcreation?
Sandra: In marketing and advertising, words do not just have meaning within a particular linguistic context but rather within a specific culture. Translating words from one language to another, as good as the translation may be, would not do much for your marketing materials. What you actually need is to have them transcreated. So, what is transcreation?
It is a creative process where a person uses the original text and creates a bicultural and bilingual version in a target language. For example, a company wants to sell medical equipment in Latin America. What would be the main advantages for them to have their brochures transcreated in Spanish?

  • The products and services provided by the company would be clearly and easily communicated to the intended market
  • The consumers would perceive the brochures as if they had been originally created in that market, therefore, they would be more ready to accept the products

Transcreation, like copy writing, persuades a consumer to buy a product or use a service.

TL: How does your company differ from the others? What makes you unique?
Sandra:

  • Our company is owned and operated by translators who have a direct knowledge of the business by working with clients in different industries and fields.
  • All our translators are native speakers, they have been certified and they pursue continuing education.
  • We establish long-term working relationships with our clients. For this reason, we are able to understand their needs and meet their expectations.
  • Our translators, our Project Manager and the end-client work together as a team. There is a constant and direct flow of communication during a particular assignment, e.g. to consult terminology with the company.
  • We do not choose randomly a translator for a particular project. If our client is a bank, we will assign it to a translator who has experience in and is aware of the financial and banking terminology.
  • We have established a quality assurance procedure. We never accept any rush or large project or any assignment outside of our areas of expertise that may compromise the quality of the final product. For example, one day we received a call from a company that was interested in translating 85,000 words for the next day. We politely refused the offer. We explained to them that the only way we might be able to finish the project in time would be to assign it to many different translators. However, the reviewer would not have any time to create a glossary, coordinate and edit the entire work in such short period of time. Since the final results would be less than acceptable for our quality standards, we preferred to not take the assignment.

TL: What advice would you give companies looking for transcreation services to avoid these company mishaps?
Sandra: Transcreation is a creative process that requires a constant interaction between a company and their language service provider. Before the start of the project, it is advisable to conduct a brainstorming session with your provider and discuss some important points:

  1. What the corporate culture is;
  2. What the expected results of their marketing campaign are; and last, but not least,
  3. What the target audience/market is. For example, launching a marketing campaign in Spanish in Mexico will significantly vary from another one in Colombia because both the language regionalisms and the cultures are different.

If you want your transcreation to be accurate and successful, your company will need to clarify any jargons that the marketing department may use, or some specific business concepts. In order for your provider to get it right, they need to understand your needs and expectation.

I believe that the worst nightmare for any linguist is when a client calls and says: “By the way, I asked my customer representative Jose who is from Mexico to review your translation. He says it has some errors.” So my reply is: “Great! If Jose is an expert in the Spanish language, maybe you should get him to organize your translation department.”

Jose may speak Spanish well but, does he have the technical writing skills to do the translation? Is he sufficiently bicultural to work on a transcreation? And the answer is: “No, stick to what you know!” The final results would be as bad as if I started working as a lawyer just because I know enough legal terminology.

I have lost count of how many times I have ended editing or redoing a translation done by someone bilingual in a company. I have spent so many hours dealing with those awkward, obscure and confusing texts that are neither Spanish nor Spanglish… I wonder what they are. Maybe we need to coin a new name for that kind of language…

TL: How can people contact you?
Sandra: Our company can be contacted by phone at 404-327-8815 or by email at intlangsolutions@bellsouth.net. You can also visit our website, http://www.international-language-solutions.com/.

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if you understand everything you must be misinformed - Japanese Proverb

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Mundet, the Wonderful Apple Soft Drink Centenario Promotion

Mundet announces the first winner of its national Centenario promotion — Julissa from Calexico, California. This contest commemorates the 100+- year heritage of Mundet, offering exciting prizes under special gold bottlecaps that can be found on Mundet Manzana Verde (Green Apple) and Sidral (Original Red Apple) Mundet bottles.

Mundet, the delicious apple-based soft drink which has been a part of the Mexican heritage since the early 20th century, is celebrating its 100+-year heritage with an exciting Centenario promotion. Consumers have the opportunity to win exciting instant-win prizes located under special gold bottlecaps found on Mundet Green Apple and Sidral Mundet glass bottles. The grand prizes are Centenarios, Mexican bullion coins created in 1921 to honor the 100-year anniversary of Mexico’s independence from Spain, with an approximate value of $1,500 each. Additional prizes include T-shirts and teddy bears.

The first Centenario prize winner was Julissa from Calexico, CA. The Centenario promotion is national in scope. Consumers still have a chance to win prizes, including more Centenario coins, because the promotion is scheduled to run through May, 2010, or until all prizes are awarded.

Mundet soft drinks are known for their unique and delicious real-apple flavor. Sidral Mundet does not contain any flavoring (natural or artificial), since its unique flavor comes from real apples. Mundet is popular with adults and children, and is considered by many to have health benefits due to its pasteurization process and since it does not contain caffeine. Many Mexican mothers use Mundet as a hydration fluid for their children.

Since 1988, Mundet soft drinks have been distributed in the United States exclusively by Novamex (www.novamex.com). Mundet is currently one of the best-selling Mexican soft drinks in the US. Novamex is a leader in the marketing and distribution of authentic Mexican products in the United States, including Jarritos, Mineragua and Mundet, delicious soft drinks with the great authentic flavor of Mexico. In additional to product sales, marketing and distribution, Novamex provides educational and sports opportunities to children and youth in high-Hispanic markets throughout the United States, and assists hundreds of churches and non-profit organizations through the donation of soft drinks that can be sold for fundraising purposes.
Source: Mundet

New Financial Services Hispanic Marketing Campaign

Fifth Third Bank (Nasdaq: FITB), a diversified financial services company headquartered in Cincinnati, OH, announced this week the launch of its new financial services Hispanic marketing campaign tailored for the growing Hispanic population. The campaign entitled “Las cosas que hacemos por los suenos,” or “The Things We Do for Dreams,” seeks to expand the Bank’s positioning as a trusted financial partner for Hispanics. The creative executions show variations of the “American Dream” such as owning a home or taking a family vacation, along with the Bank’s tips regarding how to make those dreams a reality through proper financial planning.

The campaign began running in April and will appear throughout the year in markets that are part of the Bank’s footprint: Chicago, Orlando, Tampa, Ft. Myers, Naples, Grand Rapids, and Indianapolis. The ads will run in radio, print, Out of Home and online in Spanish language media. Part of the campaign will also be a series of financial workshops and television vignettes providing tips on how to best handle one’s finances during the current economic climate and beyond. A comprehensive public relations push will support all initiatives.

Why a New Financial Services Hispanic Marketing Campaign

“The Hispanic market is a key growth segment for Fifth Third Bank. The goal with this campaign is to inform Hispanic customers about the best ways to keep their finances healthy and growing so they can make their dreams a reality,” said Larry S. Magnesen, Senior Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer.

“Fifth Third Bank just celebrated its 150th anniversary, a testament to the Bank’s strength and heritage. Our campaign seeks to couple that message of trust with a personal connection around Latino insights. At the end, the goal is simple: to get them to see Fifth Third as a partner they can trust,” commented Catherine Nunez Account Director at the vox collective, the full service advertising agency Fifth Third Bank is partnering with for many of its multicultural initiatives.

The campaign pieces can be viewed at: www.thevoxcollective.com/fifththirdbank

Fifth Third Bancorp is a diversified financial services company headquartered in Cincinnati, Ohio. The Company has $119 billion in assets, operates 16 affiliates with 1,318 full-service Banking Centers, including 99 Bank Mart(R) locations open seven days a week inside select grocery stores and 2,354 ATMs in Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana, Michigan, Illinois, Florida, Tennessee, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Missouri, Georgia and North Carolina. Fifth Third operates four main businesses: Commercial Banking, Branch Banking, Consumer Lending, and Investment Advisors. Fifth Third also has a 49% interest in Fifth Third Processing Solutions, LLC. Fifth Third is among the largest money managers in the Midwest and, as of March 31, 2009, had $166 billion in assets under care, of which it managed $23 billion for individuals, corporations and not-for-profit organizations. Investor information and press releases can be viewed at www.53.com. Fifth Third’s common stock is traded on the NASDAQ(R) National Global Select Market under the symbol “FITB.” Fifth Third Bank, Member FDIC.
Source: Fifth Third Bancorp

Hispanic Heritage Month: Sept. 15 – Oct. 15

Origin of the Hispanic Heritage Month

In September 1968, Congress authorized President Lyndon B. Johnson to proclaim National Hispanic Heritage Week, which was observed during the week that included Sept. 15 and Sept. 16. The observance was expanded in 1988 to a month long celebration (Sept. 15 – Oct. 15). America celebrates the culture and traditions of those who trace their roots to Spain, Mexico and the Spanish-speaking nations of Central America, South America and the Caribbean. Sept. 15 was chosen as the starting point for the celebration because it is the anniversary of independence of five Latin American countries: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. In addition, Mexico and Chile celebrate their independence days on Sept. 16 and Sept. 18, respectively.

Population

46.9 million

The estimated Hispanic population of the United States as of July 1, 2008, making people of Hispanic origin the nation’s largest ethnic or race minority. Hispanics constituted 15 percent of the nation’s total population. In addition, there are approximately 4 million residents of Puerto Rico.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html and http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013049.html

More than 1

…of every two people added to the nation’s population between July 1, 2007, and July 1, 2008, was Hispanic. There were 1.5 million Hispanics added to the population during the period.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html

3.2%

Percentage increase in the Hispanic population between July 1, 2007, and July 1, 2008, making Hispanics the fastest-growing minority group.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html

132.8 million

The projected Hispanic population of the United States on July 1, 2050. According to this projection, Hispanics will constitute 30 percent of the nation’s population by that date.

Source: Population projections http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/012496.html

22.4 million

The nation’s Hispanic population during the 1990 Census — less than half the current total.

Source: The Hispanic Population: 2000 http://www.census.gov/prod/2001pubs/c2kbr01-3.pdf

2nd

Ranking of the size of the U.S. Hispanic population worldwide, as of 2008. Only Mexico (110 million) had a larger Hispanic population than the United States (46.9 million).

Source: International Data Base http://www.census.gov/ipc/nas/content/live/hispanic/idbsum.html and population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html

64%

The percentage of Hispanic-origin people in the United States who were of Mexican background in 2007. Another 9 percent were of Puerto Rican background, with 3.5 percent Cuban, 3.1 percent Salvadoran and 2.7 percent Dominican. The remainder were of some other Central American, South American or other Hispanic or Latino origin.

Source: 2007 American Community Surveyhttp://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

About 45 percent of the nation’s Dominicans lived in New York City in 2007 and about half of the nation’s Cubans in Miami-Dade County, Fla.

Source: 2007 American Community Survey http://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

25%

Percentage of children younger than 5 who were Hispanic in 2008. All in all, Hispanics comprised 22 percent of children younger than 18.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html

27.7 years

Median age of the Hispanic population in 2008. This compared with 36.8 years for the population as a whole.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html

107

Number of Hispanic males in 2008 per every 100 Hispanic females. This was in sharp contrast to the overall population, which had 97 males per every 100 females.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html

States and Counties

48%

The percentage of the Hispanic-origin population that lived in California or Texas in 2008. California was home to 13.5 million Hispanics, and Texas was home to 8.9 million.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

16

The number of states with at least a half-million Hispanic residents — Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Massachusetts, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia and Washington.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

45%

The percentage of New Mexico’s population that was Hispanic in 2008, the highest of any state. Hispanics also made up at least one fifth of the population in California and Texas, at 37 percent each, Arizona (30 percent), Nevada (26 percent), Florida (21 percent) and Colorado (20 percent). New Mexico had 891,000 Hispanics.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

The Carolinas

The states with the highest percentage increases in Hispanic population between July 1, 2007, and July 1, 2008. South Carolina’s increase was 7.7 percent and North Carolina’s was 7.4 percent.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

4.7 million

The Hispanic population of Los Angeles County, Calif., in 2008 — the largest of any county in the nation. Los Angeles County also had the biggest numerical increase in the Hispanic population (67,000) since July 2007.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

97%

Proportion of the population of Starr County, Texas, that was Hispanic as of 2008, which led the nation. All of the top 10 counties in this category were in Texas.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

48

Number of the nation’s 3,142 counties that are majority-Hispanic.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

15%

Percent increase in the Hispanic population in Luzerne County, Pa., from July 1, 2007, to July 1, 2008. Among all counties with 2007 Hispanic populations of at least 10,000, Luzerne topped the nation in this category. Luzerne’s county seat is Wilkes-Barre.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

313,000

The increase in California’s Hispanic population between July 1, 2007, and July 1, 2008, which led all states. Texas (305,000) and Florida (111,000) also recorded large increases.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

20

Number of states in which Hispanics are the largest minority group. These states are Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Massachusetts, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, Texas, Utah, Washington and Wyoming.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

Businesses

Source for statements in this section: Hispanic-owned Firms: 2002http://www.census.gov/csd/sbo/hispanic2002.htm

1.6 million

The number of Hispanic-owned businesses in 2002.

Nearly 43 percent of Hispanic-owned firms operated in construction; administrative and support, and waste management and remediation services; and other services, such as personal services, and repair and maintenance. Retail and wholesale trade accounted for nearly 36 percent of Hispanic-owned business revenue.

Counties with the highest number of Hispanic-owned firms were Los Angeles County (188,422); Miami-Dade County (163,187); and Harris County, Texas (61,934).

Triple

The rate of growth of Hispanic-owned businesses between 1997 and 2002 (31 percent) compared with the national average (10 percent) for all businesses.

$222 billion

Revenue generated by Hispanic-owned businesses in 2002, up 19 percent from 1997.

44.6%

…of all Hispanic-owned firms were owned by people of Mexican origin (Mexican, Mexican-American or Chicano).

29,168

Number of Hispanic-owned firms with receipts of $1 million or more.

Families and Children

10.4 million

The number of Hispanic family households in the United States in 2008. Of these households, 62 percent included children younger than 18.

Source: Families and Living Arrangements http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/families_households/013378.html

66%

The percentage of Hispanic family households consisting of a married couple.

Source: Families and Living Arrangements http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/families_households/013378.html

43%

The percentage of Hispanic family households consisting of a married couple with children younger than 18.

Source: Families and Living Arrangements http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/families_households/013378.html

70%

Percentage of Hispanic children living with two parents.

Source: Families and Living Arrangements http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/families_households/013378.html

Spanish Language

35 million

The number of U.S. residents 5 and older who spoke Spanish at home in 2007. Those who hablan espanol constituted 12 percent of U.S. residents. More than half of these Spanish speakers spoke English “very well.”

Source: 2007 American Community Survey http://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

4

Number of states where at least one-in-five residents spoke Spanish at home in 2007 — Arizona, California, New Mexico and Texas.

Source: 2007 American Community Survey http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/american_community_survey_acs/012634.html

78%

Percentage of Hispanics 5 and older who spoke Spanish at home in 2007.

Source: 2007 American Community Surveyhttp://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

Income, Poverty and Health Insurance

$38,679

The median income of Hispanic households in 2007, statistically unchanged from the previous year after adjusting for inflation.

Source: Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2007 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/income_wealth/012528.html

21.5%

The poverty rate among Hispanics in 2007, up from 20.6 percent in 2006.

Source: Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2007 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/income_wealth/012528.html

32.1%

The percentage of Hispanics who lacked health insurance in 2007, down from 34.1 percent in 2006.

Source: Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2007 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/income_wealth/012528.html

Education

53%

The percentage of Hispanic 4-year-olds enrolled in nursery school in 2007, up from 43 percent in 1997 and 21 percent in 1987.

Source: School Enrollment – Social and Economic Characteristics of Students: October 2007http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013391.html

62%

The percentage of Hispanics 25 and older who had at least a high school education in 2008.

Source: Educational Attainment in the United States: 2008 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013618.html

13%

The percentage of the Hispanic population 25 and older with a bachelor’s degree or higher in 2008.

Source: Educational Attainment in the United States: 2008 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013618.html

3.6 million

The number of Hispanics 18 and older who had at least a bachelor’s degree in 2008.

Source: Educational Attainment in the United States: 2008 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013618.html

1 million

Number of Hispanics 25 and older with advanced degrees in 2008 (e.g., master’s, professional, doctorate).

Source: Educational Attainment in the United States: 2008 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013618.html

12%

Percentage of full-time college students (both undergraduate and graduate students) in October 2007 who were Hispanic, up from 10 percent in 2006.

Source: School Enrollment – Social and Economic Characteristics of Students: October 2007 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013391.html

20%

Percentage of elementary and high school students combined who were Hispanic.

Source: School Enrollment – Social and Economic Characteristics of Students: October 2007 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013391.html

Names

4

The number of Hispanic surnames ranked among the 15 most common in 2000. It was the first time that a Hispanic surname reached the top 15 during a census. Garcia was the most frequent Hispanic surname, occurring 858,289 times and placing eighth on the list — up from 18th in 1990. Rodriguez (ninth), Martinez (11th) and Hernandez (15th) were the next most common Hispanic surnames.

Source: Census 2000 Genealogy http://www.census.gov/genealogy/nas/content/live/hispanic/freqnames2k.html

Jobs

67%

Percentage of Hispanics 16 and older who were in the civilian labor force in 2007.

Source: 2007 American Community Survey http://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

18%

The percentage of Hispanics 16 or older who worked in management, professional and related occupations in 2007. The same percentage worked in production, transportation and material moving occupations. Another 16 percent worked in construction, extraction, maintenance and repair occupations. Approximately 24 percent of Hispanics 16 or older worked in service occupations; 21 percent in sales and office occupations; and 2 percent in farming, fishing and forestry occupations.

Source: 2007 American Community Survey http://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

79,400

Number of Hispanic chief executives. In addition, 50,866 physicians and surgeons; 48,720 postsecondary teachers; 38,532 lawyers; and 2,726 news analysts, reporters and correspondents are Hispanic.

Source: Upcoming Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2010, Table 603 http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/

Voting

5.6 million

The number of Hispanic citizens who reported voting in the 2006 congressional elections. The percentage of Hispanic citizens voting — about 32 percent — did not change statistically from four years earlier.

Source: Voting and Registration in the Election of November 2006 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/voting/012234.html

Serving our Country

1.1 million

The number of Hispanic veterans of the U.S. armed forces.

Source: 2007 American Community Survey http://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

Following is a list of observances typically covered by the Census Bureau’s Facts for Features series:
African-American History Month (February) Labor Day
Super Bowl Grandparents Day
Valentine’s Day (Feb. 14) Hispanic Heritage Month
Women’s History Month (March) (Sept. 15-Oct. 15)
Irish-American Heritage Month (March)/ Unmarried and Single
St. Patrick’s Day (March 17) Americans Week
Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month (May) Halloween (Oct. 31)
Older Americans Month (May) American Indian/Alaska
Cinco de Mayo (May 5) Native Heritage Month
Mother’s Day (November)
Father’s Day Veterans Day (Nov. 11)
The Fourth of July (July 4) Thanksgiving Day
Anniversary of Americans with The Holiday Season
Disabilities Act (July 26) (December)
Back to School (August)
Editor’s note: The preceding data were collected from a variety of sources and may be subject to sampling variability and other sources of error. Facts for Features are customarily released about two months before an observance in order to accommodate magazine production timelines. Questions or comments should be directed to the Census Bureau’s Public Information Office: telephone: 301-763-3030; fax: 301-763-3762; or e-mail: pio@census.gov.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau

Publix tries to appeal to Hispanic market in Georgia

Hispanic buying power in Georgia has grown by 1037% since 1990, No wonder Publix tries to appeal to Hispanic market in Georgia!

Norcross store gets makeover with focus on items from Mexico

“Do you have the sombrero? Has it arrived yet?”

It’s not the kind of question a grocery store manager overseeing the final details of a renovation would normally expect from a contractor. But for Marco Guillen, it’s just all in a day’s work.

Guillen is the point man on Publix Super Markets newest experiment — the first store outside of the company’s home turf in Florida designed to appeal to Hispanic shoppers.

The store, located in a heavily Hispanic neighborhood that Census records show is predominantly Mexican in origin, features bilingual signs and shelves stocked with more than 1,500 new Mexican and Central American items brought into the store in recent months.

Where Hispanic foods were once isolated in a single aisle, they’re now spread throughout the store. Dried guajillo chiles are piled up in a box in the produce section. Jarritos soft drinks take up shelf space near Coke and Pepsi products. Foca powder detergent is near the Tide. Colorful pinatas are scattered throughout.

“We really had to go out and challenge our suppliers to go out and get us items that are traditionally Mexican. Not Mexican-American, but Mexican,” said the company’s Atlanta spokeswoman, Brenda Reid.

The store also features a salsa bar, deli items meant to appeal to the Hispanic palate and an expanded number of Western Union terminals, popular with Hispanic immigrants sending money home. About half of its employees are bilingual, recruited from Publix stores all over metro Atlanta, Reid said.

The store has been slowly rolling out the changes for months. It formally debuts Thursday with a grand opening featuring a mariachi band and other festivities.

The effort is rooted in rising Hispanic buying power and increasing competition from ethnic groceries that cater to the fast-growing Hispanic and Asian communities, Reid said.

Hispanic buying power in Georgia has grown by 1037 percent since 1990, outstripping the 194 percent growth for the overall market by more than five times, according to the Selig Center for Economic Growth at the University of Georgia.

Hispanics now account for 5.1 percent of Georgia’s buying power and are projected to outpace the growth by all other ethnic groups, according to the center.

A spokesman for Kroger, metro Atlanta’s leading grocer, said his company hasn’t explicity labeled any one store to appeal to a specific demographic. But Glynn Jenkins said the company adjusts each store’s product mix to appeal to local tastes.

Publix tries to appeal to Hispanic market in Georgia

Guillen said the changes at his store have gone over well with both Hispanic and non-Hispanic customers. The store’s bright new color palette and the fact that the store only eliminated a handful of unpopular items to make way for its new Hispanic product mix continues to bring in customers of all stripes, he said.

Source: The Atlanta Journal-Constitution – Michael Pearson

Making of the commercial Toyota Highlander

I wanted to share the making of a 2007 commercial for the Puerto Rican market. The shoot took place in a city far, far away – in my beloved Buenos Aires.

Producer: Landia
Dir : Karina Minujin / Maxi Blanco
Asist de Dir :Ezequiel Avaro
Jefe Prod. : Guada Tellado
D.F. : Marcelo Camorino
Dir de Arte : Natalia Grosso

The main message is about changes and how we adapt to things, in this case how the Toyota Highlander adapts to us. And this is how it plays in Puerto Rico.

The Toyota Highlander commercial

First, watch the commercial:

Making of the commercial Toyota Highlander

Now, the making of the commercial for Toyota Highlander with the polar bear animatronics head:

Marketing Message Horribly Gone Awry

Don’t allow this to happen to your marketing messages!!!!

The English is clear enough to lorry drivers - but the Welsh reads "I am not in the office at the moment. Send any work to be translated."

The English is clear enough to lorry drivers – but the Welsh reads “I am not in the office at the moment. Send any work to be translated.”

When officials asked for the Welsh translation of a road sign, they thought the reply was what they needed.
Unfortunately, the e-mail response to Swansea council said in Welsh: “I am not in the office at the moment. Send any work to be translated”.
So that was what went up under the English version which barred lorries from a road near a supermarket.
“When they’re proofing signs, they should really use someone who speaks Welsh,” said journalist Dylan Iorwerth.
Swansea Council became lost in translation when it was looking to halt heavy goods vehicles using a road near an Asda store in the Morriston area.
All official road signs in Wales are bilingual, so the local authority e-mailed its in-house translation service for the Welsh version of: “No entry for heavy goods vehicles. Residential site only”.
The reply duly came back and officials set the wheels in motion to create the large sign in both languages.

The notice went up and all seemed well – until Welsh speakers began pointing out the embarrassing error.
Welsh-language magazine Golwg was promptly sent photographs of the offending sign by a number of its readers.
Managing editor Mr Iorwerth said: “We’ve been running a series of these pictures over the past months.
“They’re circulating among Welsh speakers because, unfortunately, it’s all too common that things are not just badly translated, but are put together by people who have no idea about the language.
“It’s good to see people trying to translate, but they should really ask for expert help.
“Everything these days seems to be written first in English and then translated.
“Ideally, they should be written separately in both languages.”

A council spokeswoman said: “Our attention was drawn to the mistranslation of a sign at the junction of Clase Road and Pant-y-Blawd Road.

Other confusing signs

“We took it down as soon as we were made aware of it and a correct sign will be re-instated as soon as possible.”
The blunder is not the only time Welsh has been translated incorrectly or put in the wrong place:

  • Cyclists between Cardiff and Penarth in 2006 were left confused by a bilingual road sign telling them they had problems with an “inflamed bladder”.
  • In the same year, a sign for pedestrians in Cardiff reading ‘Look Right’ in English read ‘Look Left’ in Welsh.
  • In 2006, a shared-faith school in Wrexham removed a sign which translated Welsh for staff as “wooden stave”.
  • Football fans at a FA Cup tie between Oldham and Chasetown – two English teams – in 2005 were left scratching their heads after a Welsh-language hoarding was put up along the pitch. It should have gone to a match in Merthyr Tydfil.
  • People living near an Aberdeenshire building site in 2006 were mystified when a sign apologising for the inconvenience was written in Welsh as well as English.

It’s good to see people trying to translate but they should really ask for expert help

There's still time to change the road you're on - Led Zep

There’s still time to change the road you’re on – Led Zep

Source:BBC

New, Personalized Spanish Story Book for Children

I happened upon this product and thought it was incredible. You have to try it for yourself at www.frecklebox.com and then select spanish (soft or hard cover) but keep on reading….

Santa Clara, CA (PRWEB) December 11, 2008 — Frecklebox, provider of personalized gifts for kids, announced today that it has officially launched its first Spanish product, a story book that includes an individual child’s name in a collection of nature settings. In the near future, Frecklebox plans to continue to expand its line of personalized Spanish story book and gifts.

Frecklebox lets customers experience the magic of image personalization. Everyone has seen books with a child’s name in text, but nothing beats the expression on a child’s face when they see their name spelled in actual images of clouds, flowers, stars, pigeons and more. Through its web site, frecklebox.com, the company makes it quick and easy to customize gifts that prominently feature the child’s name.

“We created Frecklebox as a way for people to give gifts that are as wonderfully unique as the child they are buying the gift for,” said Scott Feldman, president of Frecklebox. “The fact that we have been able to expand our product line into Spanish, is helping us meet a need for many of our customers looking for the perfect present in their native language.”

Frecklebox personalized spanish story book products include:

  • Story books – The Nature Name Book (available in English and Spanish), The Zoo Book, Hip Hop Howie, Happy Birthday and The Unicorn
  • Coloring books – Five different options make these popular as fun and affordable party favors
  • Posters, placemats and puzzles – Reasonably priced gifts for any occasion
  • Growth charts – A practical product that adds fashionable décor to any style room

About Frecklebox:
Frecklebox, headquartered in Santa Clara, California, was created with the mission to educate and entertain kids through a wide selection of personalized books, posters, journals and other products. Frecklebox is an online-only source for truly unique, personalized gifts for children at affordable prices.

For more information about Frecklebox and their products, please visit frecklebox.com.

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If I don't sleep, nobody sleeps.

If I don’t sleep, nobody sleeps.

Source: http://www.prweb.com/pingpr.php/RW1wdC1QaWdnLVRoaXItTWFnbi1aZXRhLVNpbmctWmVybw==

5 company mishaps in Spanish Language by Sandra Bravo

by Claudia Ahaviah Goffan

TL: Can you give us examples of company mishaps when it comes to the Spanish language, which ones come to mind?
Sandra: Hewlett Packard caused some controversy in Argentina when they introduced their products in that market. Their logo bears only the initials “HP”, and to an Argentine, it translates into the abbreviation for “Son of a #@%#”

Have you heard of the Mazda Laputa (the streetwalker, to put it mildly) or the Nissan Moco (mucus) or the Mitsubishi Pajero (this one is too strong to translate in a public medium) later renamed Montero? Do you wonder why these names are culturally offensive in Spanish? If you are still in doubt, ask your best Latino friend…

5 company mishaps when it comes to the Spanish language

5 company mishaps when it comes to the Spanish language

Ignoring culturally appropriate contexts can get your company into some trouble. For example, some Muslim countries banned Pokemon in 2001 because cards apparently contained some “Zionist” symbols. Or Google, that received a complaint from the Government of Taiwan when the map engine identified the country as a “province of China.”

TL: Can you tell me when companies have done it right and why?
Sandra: One of the many reasons why I love to bank at Washington Mutual is the way they reach at the Hispanic community. It is not just the fact that they have tellers who are bilingual. Most importantly, the translation of their marketing materials clearly reflects the Latino culture. It is about diversity. It is about communicating with clients in their own language – and very well written, by the way!

Another company that has embraced diversity is Comcast. The dynamic and upbeat style of their promotional flyers in Spanish, for example, is very eye-catching. Comcast has found out a way to reach the Latino market. Why? Because they understand it is not just getting the language right, but rather the culture. Comcast ads speak about family, kids and parents and time for friends.

TL: What’s the difference between translation and transcreation?
Sandra: In marketing and advertising, words do not just have meaning within a particular linguistic context but rather within a specific culture. Translating words from one language to another, as good as the translation may be, would not do much for your marketing materials. What you actually need is to have them transcreated. So, what is transcreation?
It is a creative process where a person uses the original text and creates a bicultural and bilingual version in a target language. For example, a company wants to sell medical equipment in Latin America. What would be the main advantages for them to have their brochures transcreated in Spanish?

  • The products and services provided by the company would be clearly and easily communicated to the intended market
  • The consumers would perceive the brochures as if they had been originally created in that market, therefore, they would be more ready to accept the products

Transcreation, like copy writing, persuades a consumer to buy a product or use a service.

TL: How does your company differ from the others? What makes you unique?
Sandra:

  • Our company is owned and operated by translators who have a direct knowledge of the business by working with clients in different industries and fields.
  • All our translators are native speakers, they have been certified and they pursue continuing education.
  • We establish long-term working relationships with our clients. For this reason, we are able to understand their needs and meet their expectations.
  • Our translators, our Project Manager and the end-client work together as a team. There is a constant and direct flow of communication during a particular assignment, e.g. to consult terminology with the company.
  • We do not choose randomly a translator for a particular project. If our client is a bank, we will assign it to a translator who has experience in and is aware of the financial and banking terminology.
  • We have established a quality assurance procedure. We never accept any rush or large project or any assignment outside of our areas of expertise that may compromise the quality of the final product. For example, one day we received a call from a company that was interested in translating 85,000 words for the next day. We politely refused the offer. We explained to them that the only way we might be able to finish the project in time would be to assign it to many different translators. However, the reviewer would not have any time to create a glossary, coordinate and edit the entire work in such short period of time. Since the final results would be less than acceptable for our quality standards, we preferred to not take the assignment.

TL: What advice would you give companies looking for transcreation services to avoid these company mishaps?
Sandra: Transcreation is a creative process that requires a constant interaction between a company and their language service provider. Before the start of the project, it is advisable to conduct a brainstorming session with your provider and discuss some important points:

  1. What the corporate culture is;
  2. What the expected results of their marketing campaign are; and last, but not least,
  3. What the target audience/market is. For example, launching a marketing campaign in Spanish in Mexico will significantly vary from another one in Colombia because both the language regionalisms and the cultures are different.

If you want your transcreation to be accurate and successful, your company will need to clarify any jargons that the marketing department may use, or some specific business concepts. In order for your provider to get it right, they need to understand your needs and expectation.

I believe that the worst nightmare for any linguist is when a client calls and says: “By the way, I asked my customer representative Jose who is from Mexico to review your translation. He says it has some errors.” So my reply is: “Great! If Jose is an expert in the Spanish language, maybe you should get him to organize your translation department.”

Jose may speak Spanish well but, does he have the technical writing skills to do the translation? Is he sufficiently bicultural to work on a transcreation? And the answer is: “No, stick to what you know!” The final results would be as bad as if I started working as a lawyer just because I know enough legal terminology.

I have lost count of how many times I have ended editing or redoing a translation done by someone bilingual in a company. I have spent so many hours dealing with those awkward, obscure and confusing texts that are neither Spanish nor Spanglish… I wonder what they are. Maybe we need to coin a new name for that kind of language…

TL: How can people contact you?
Sandra: Our company can be contacted by phone at 404-327-8815 or by email at intlangsolutions@bellsouth.net. You can also visit our website, http://www.international-language-solutions.com/.

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if you understand everything you must be misinformed - Japanese Proverb

if you understand everything you must be misinformed – Japanese Proverb