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What will the U.S. look like in 2050?

U.S. Population Projections: 2005–2050 - What will the U.S. look like in 2050?

U.S. Population Projections: 2005–2050 – What will the U.S. look like in 2050?

U.S. Population Projections: 2005–2050

What will the U.S. look like in 2050? Population and Immigration

Between 2005 and 2050, the nation’s population will increase to 438 million from 296 million, a rise of 142 million people that represents growth of 48%.

Immigrants who arrive after 2005, and their U.S.-born descendants, account for 82% of the projected national population increase during the 2005–2050 period.

Of  the 117 additional people attributable to the effect of new immigration, 67 million will be the immigrants themselves and 50 million will be their U.S.-born children and grandchildren

The nation’s foreign-born population, 36 million in 2005, is projected to rise to 81 million in 2050, growth of 129%.

In 2050, nearly one in five Americans (19%) will be an immigrant, compared with one in eight now (12% in 2005).

• The foreign-born share of the nation’s population will exceed historic highs sometime between 2020 and 2025, when it reaches 15%. The historic peak share was 14.7% in 1910 and 14.8% in 1890.

• Births in the United States will play a growing role in Hispanic and Asian population growth, so a diminishing proportion of both groups will be foreign-born.

What will the U.S. look like in 2050? Racial and Ethnic Groups

• The Hispanic population, 42 million in 2005, will rise to 128 million in 2050, tripling in size. Latinos will be 29% of the population, compared with 14% in 2005. Latinos will account for 60% of the nation’s population growth from 2005 to 2050.

• The black population, 38 million in 2005, will grow to 59 million in 2050, a rise of 56%. In 2050, the nation’s population will be 13.4% black, compared with 12.8% in 2005.

• The Asian population, 14 million in 2005, will grow to 41 million in 2050, nearly tripling in size. In 2050, the nation’s population will be 9% Asian, compared with 5% in 2005. Most Asians in the United States were foreign born in 2005 (58%), but by 2050, fewer than half (47%) will be.

• The white, non-Hispanic population, 199 million in 2005, will grow to 207 million in 2050, a 4% increase. In 2050, 47% of the U.S. population will be non-Hispanic white, compared with 67% in 2005.

What will the U.S. look like in 2050? Age Groups

• The working-age population—adults ages 18 to 64—will reach 255 million in 2050, up from 186 million in 2005. This segment will grow more slowly over the projection period (37%) than the overall population. Future immigrants and their descendants will account for all growth in this group.

• Among working-age adults, the foreign-born share, 15% in 2005, will rise to 23% in 2050. The Hispanic share, 14% in 2005, will increase to 31% in 2050. The non-Hispanic white share, 68% in 2005, will decline to 45% in 2050.

• The nation’s population of children ages 17 and younger will rise to 102 million in 2050, up from 73 million in 2005. The child population will grow more slowly in future decades (39%) than will the overall population. Future immigrants and their descendants will account for all growth in this population segment.

• Among children, the share who are immigrants or who have an immigrant parent will rise to 34% in 2050 from 23% in 2005. The share of children who are Hispanic, 20% in 2005, will rise to 35% in 2050. Non-Hispanic whites, who make up 59% of today’s children, will be 40% of children in 2050.

• The nation’s elderly population— people ages 65 and older—will grow to 81 million in 2050, up from 37 million in 2005. This group will grow more rapidly than the overall population, so its share will increase to 19% in 2050, from 12% in 2005. Immigration will account for only a small part of that growth.

• The dependency ratio—the number of people of working age, compared with the number of young and elderly—will rise sharply, mainly because of growth in the elderly population. There were 59 children and elderly people per 100 adults of working age in 2005. That will rise to 72 dependents per 100 adults of working age in 2050.

What will the U.S. look like in 2050? Alternative Projection Scenarios

• Under a lower-immigration scenario, the total population would rise to 384 million, the foreign-born share would stabilize at 13% and the Hispanic share would go up to 26% in 2050.

• Under a higher-immigration scenario, the total population would rise to 496 million, the foreign-born share would rise to 23% and the Hispanic share would go up to 32% in 2050.

• Under a lower- or higher-immigration scenario, the dependency ratio would range from 75 dependents per 100 people of working age to 69 dependents per 100 people of working age. Both of these ratios are well above the current value of 59 dependents per 100 people of working age.

Estimates of the Unauthorized Immigrant Population 2010 - Pew Hispanic
Let's talk about Salvadorans
Have you heard about Cubans?
What are Puerto Ricans like?
Accessing of social networking sites or blogs also saw significant growth, increasing 2.6 percentage points to 20.8 percent of mobile subscribers.

Source: Pew Research Center – 2008

What will the U.S. look like in 2050?

U.S. Population Projections: 2005–2050 - What will the U.S. look like in 2050?

U.S. Population Projections: 2005–2050 – What will the U.S. look like in 2050?

U.S. Population Projections: 2005–2050

What will the U.S. look like in 2050? Population and Immigration

Between 2005 and 2050, the nation’s population will increase to 438 million from 296 million, a rise of 142 million people that represents growth of 48%.

Immigrants who arrive after 2005, and their U.S.-born descendants, account for 82% of the projected national population increase during the 2005–2050 period.

Of  the 117 additional people attributable to the effect of new immigration, 67 million will be the immigrants themselves and 50 million will be their U.S.-born children and grandchildren

The nation’s foreign-born population, 36 million in 2005, is projected to rise to 81 million in 2050, growth of 129%.

In 2050, nearly one in five Americans (19%) will be an immigrant, compared with one in eight now (12% in 2005).

• The foreign-born share of the nation’s population will exceed historic highs sometime between 2020 and 2025, when it reaches 15%. The historic peak share was 14.7% in 1910 and 14.8% in 1890.

• Births in the United States will play a growing role in Hispanic and Asian population growth, so a diminishing proportion of both groups will be foreign-born.

What will the U.S. look like in 2050? Racial and Ethnic Groups

• The Hispanic population, 42 million in 2005, will rise to 128 million in 2050, tripling in size. Latinos will be 29% of the population, compared with 14% in 2005. Latinos will account for 60% of the nation’s population growth from 2005 to 2050.

• The black population, 38 million in 2005, will grow to 59 million in 2050, a rise of 56%. In 2050, the nation’s population will be 13.4% black, compared with 12.8% in 2005.

• The Asian population, 14 million in 2005, will grow to 41 million in 2050, nearly tripling in size. In 2050, the nation’s population will be 9% Asian, compared with 5% in 2005. Most Asians in the United States were foreign born in 2005 (58%), but by 2050, fewer than half (47%) will be.

• The white, non-Hispanic population, 199 million in 2005, will grow to 207 million in 2050, a 4% increase. In 2050, 47% of the U.S. population will be non-Hispanic white, compared with 67% in 2005.

What will the U.S. look like in 2050? Age Groups

• The working-age population—adults ages 18 to 64—will reach 255 million in 2050, up from 186 million in 2005. This segment will grow more slowly over the projection period (37%) than the overall population. Future immigrants and their descendants will account for all growth in this group.

• Among working-age adults, the foreign-born share, 15% in 2005, will rise to 23% in 2050. The Hispanic share, 14% in 2005, will increase to 31% in 2050. The non-Hispanic white share, 68% in 2005, will decline to 45% in 2050.

• The nation’s population of children ages 17 and younger will rise to 102 million in 2050, up from 73 million in 2005. The child population will grow more slowly in future decades (39%) than will the overall population. Future immigrants and their descendants will account for all growth in this population segment.

• Among children, the share who are immigrants or who have an immigrant parent will rise to 34% in 2050 from 23% in 2005. The share of children who are Hispanic, 20% in 2005, will rise to 35% in 2050. Non-Hispanic whites, who make up 59% of today’s children, will be 40% of children in 2050.

• The nation’s elderly population— people ages 65 and older—will grow to 81 million in 2050, up from 37 million in 2005. This group will grow more rapidly than the overall population, so its share will increase to 19% in 2050, from 12% in 2005. Immigration will account for only a small part of that growth.

• The dependency ratio—the number of people of working age, compared with the number of young and elderly—will rise sharply, mainly because of growth in the elderly population. There were 59 children and elderly people per 100 adults of working age in 2005. That will rise to 72 dependents per 100 adults of working age in 2050.

What will the U.S. look like in 2050? Alternative Projection Scenarios

• Under a lower-immigration scenario, the total population would rise to 384 million, the foreign-born share would stabilize at 13% and the Hispanic share would go up to 26% in 2050.

• Under a higher-immigration scenario, the total population would rise to 496 million, the foreign-born share would rise to 23% and the Hispanic share would go up to 32% in 2050.

• Under a lower- or higher-immigration scenario, the dependency ratio would range from 75 dependents per 100 people of working age to 69 dependents per 100 people of working age. Both of these ratios are well above the current value of 59 dependents per 100 people of working age.

Estimates of the Unauthorized Immigrant Population 2010 - Pew Hispanic
Let's talk about Salvadorans
Have you heard about Cubans?
What are Puerto Ricans like?
Accessing of social networking sites or blogs also saw significant growth, increasing 2.6 percentage points to 20.8 percent of mobile subscribers.

Source: Pew Research Center – 2008

Hispanic Heritage Month: Sept. 15 – Oct. 15

Origin of the Hispanic Heritage Month

In September 1968, Congress authorized President Lyndon B. Johnson to proclaim National Hispanic Heritage Week, which was observed during the week that included Sept. 15 and Sept. 16. The observance was expanded in 1988 to a month long celebration (Sept. 15 – Oct. 15). America celebrates the culture and traditions of those who trace their roots to Spain, Mexico and the Spanish-speaking nations of Central America, South America and the Caribbean. Sept. 15 was chosen as the starting point for the celebration because it is the anniversary of independence of five Latin American countries: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. In addition, Mexico and Chile celebrate their independence days on Sept. 16 and Sept. 18, respectively.

Population

46.9 million

The estimated Hispanic population of the United States as of July 1, 2008, making people of Hispanic origin the nation’s largest ethnic or race minority. Hispanics constituted 15 percent of the nation’s total population. In addition, there are approximately 4 million residents of Puerto Rico.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html and http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013049.html

More than 1

…of every two people added to the nation’s population between July 1, 2007, and July 1, 2008, was Hispanic. There were 1.5 million Hispanics added to the population during the period.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html

3.2%

Percentage increase in the Hispanic population between July 1, 2007, and July 1, 2008, making Hispanics the fastest-growing minority group.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html

132.8 million

The projected Hispanic population of the United States on July 1, 2050. According to this projection, Hispanics will constitute 30 percent of the nation’s population by that date.

Source: Population projections http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/012496.html

22.4 million

The nation’s Hispanic population during the 1990 Census — less than half the current total.

Source: The Hispanic Population: 2000 http://www.census.gov/prod/2001pubs/c2kbr01-3.pdf

2nd

Ranking of the size of the U.S. Hispanic population worldwide, as of 2008. Only Mexico (110 million) had a larger Hispanic population than the United States (46.9 million).

Source: International Data Base http://www.census.gov/ipc/nas/content/live/hispanic/idbsum.html and population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html

64%

The percentage of Hispanic-origin people in the United States who were of Mexican background in 2007. Another 9 percent were of Puerto Rican background, with 3.5 percent Cuban, 3.1 percent Salvadoran and 2.7 percent Dominican. The remainder were of some other Central American, South American or other Hispanic or Latino origin.

Source: 2007 American Community Surveyhttp://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

About 45 percent of the nation’s Dominicans lived in New York City in 2007 and about half of the nation’s Cubans in Miami-Dade County, Fla.

Source: 2007 American Community Survey http://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

25%

Percentage of children younger than 5 who were Hispanic in 2008. All in all, Hispanics comprised 22 percent of children younger than 18.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html

27.7 years

Median age of the Hispanic population in 2008. This compared with 36.8 years for the population as a whole.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html

107

Number of Hispanic males in 2008 per every 100 Hispanic females. This was in sharp contrast to the overall population, which had 97 males per every 100 females.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html

States and Counties

48%

The percentage of the Hispanic-origin population that lived in California or Texas in 2008. California was home to 13.5 million Hispanics, and Texas was home to 8.9 million.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

16

The number of states with at least a half-million Hispanic residents — Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Massachusetts, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia and Washington.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

45%

The percentage of New Mexico’s population that was Hispanic in 2008, the highest of any state. Hispanics also made up at least one fifth of the population in California and Texas, at 37 percent each, Arizona (30 percent), Nevada (26 percent), Florida (21 percent) and Colorado (20 percent). New Mexico had 891,000 Hispanics.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

The Carolinas

The states with the highest percentage increases in Hispanic population between July 1, 2007, and July 1, 2008. South Carolina’s increase was 7.7 percent and North Carolina’s was 7.4 percent.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

4.7 million

The Hispanic population of Los Angeles County, Calif., in 2008 — the largest of any county in the nation. Los Angeles County also had the biggest numerical increase in the Hispanic population (67,000) since July 2007.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

97%

Proportion of the population of Starr County, Texas, that was Hispanic as of 2008, which led the nation. All of the top 10 counties in this category were in Texas.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

48

Number of the nation’s 3,142 counties that are majority-Hispanic.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

15%

Percent increase in the Hispanic population in Luzerne County, Pa., from July 1, 2007, to July 1, 2008. Among all counties with 2007 Hispanic populations of at least 10,000, Luzerne topped the nation in this category. Luzerne’s county seat is Wilkes-Barre.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

313,000

The increase in California’s Hispanic population between July 1, 2007, and July 1, 2008, which led all states. Texas (305,000) and Florida (111,000) also recorded large increases.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

20

Number of states in which Hispanics are the largest minority group. These states are Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Massachusetts, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, Texas, Utah, Washington and Wyoming.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

Businesses

Source for statements in this section: Hispanic-owned Firms: 2002http://www.census.gov/csd/sbo/hispanic2002.htm

1.6 million

The number of Hispanic-owned businesses in 2002.

Nearly 43 percent of Hispanic-owned firms operated in construction; administrative and support, and waste management and remediation services; and other services, such as personal services, and repair and maintenance. Retail and wholesale trade accounted for nearly 36 percent of Hispanic-owned business revenue.

Counties with the highest number of Hispanic-owned firms were Los Angeles County (188,422); Miami-Dade County (163,187); and Harris County, Texas (61,934).

Triple

The rate of growth of Hispanic-owned businesses between 1997 and 2002 (31 percent) compared with the national average (10 percent) for all businesses.

$222 billion

Revenue generated by Hispanic-owned businesses in 2002, up 19 percent from 1997.

44.6%

…of all Hispanic-owned firms were owned by people of Mexican origin (Mexican, Mexican-American or Chicano).

29,168

Number of Hispanic-owned firms with receipts of $1 million or more.

Families and Children

10.4 million

The number of Hispanic family households in the United States in 2008. Of these households, 62 percent included children younger than 18.

Source: Families and Living Arrangements http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/families_households/013378.html

66%

The percentage of Hispanic family households consisting of a married couple.

Source: Families and Living Arrangements http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/families_households/013378.html

43%

The percentage of Hispanic family households consisting of a married couple with children younger than 18.

Source: Families and Living Arrangements http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/families_households/013378.html

70%

Percentage of Hispanic children living with two parents.

Source: Families and Living Arrangements http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/families_households/013378.html

Spanish Language

35 million

The number of U.S. residents 5 and older who spoke Spanish at home in 2007. Those who hablan espanol constituted 12 percent of U.S. residents. More than half of these Spanish speakers spoke English “very well.”

Source: 2007 American Community Survey http://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

4

Number of states where at least one-in-five residents spoke Spanish at home in 2007 — Arizona, California, New Mexico and Texas.

Source: 2007 American Community Survey http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/american_community_survey_acs/012634.html

78%

Percentage of Hispanics 5 and older who spoke Spanish at home in 2007.

Source: 2007 American Community Surveyhttp://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

Income, Poverty and Health Insurance

$38,679

The median income of Hispanic households in 2007, statistically unchanged from the previous year after adjusting for inflation.

Source: Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2007 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/income_wealth/012528.html

21.5%

The poverty rate among Hispanics in 2007, up from 20.6 percent in 2006.

Source: Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2007 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/income_wealth/012528.html

32.1%

The percentage of Hispanics who lacked health insurance in 2007, down from 34.1 percent in 2006.

Source: Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2007 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/income_wealth/012528.html

Education

53%

The percentage of Hispanic 4-year-olds enrolled in nursery school in 2007, up from 43 percent in 1997 and 21 percent in 1987.

Source: School Enrollment – Social and Economic Characteristics of Students: October 2007http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013391.html

62%

The percentage of Hispanics 25 and older who had at least a high school education in 2008.

Source: Educational Attainment in the United States: 2008 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013618.html

13%

The percentage of the Hispanic population 25 and older with a bachelor’s degree or higher in 2008.

Source: Educational Attainment in the United States: 2008 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013618.html

3.6 million

The number of Hispanics 18 and older who had at least a bachelor’s degree in 2008.

Source: Educational Attainment in the United States: 2008 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013618.html

1 million

Number of Hispanics 25 and older with advanced degrees in 2008 (e.g., master’s, professional, doctorate).

Source: Educational Attainment in the United States: 2008 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013618.html

12%

Percentage of full-time college students (both undergraduate and graduate students) in October 2007 who were Hispanic, up from 10 percent in 2006.

Source: School Enrollment – Social and Economic Characteristics of Students: October 2007 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013391.html

20%

Percentage of elementary and high school students combined who were Hispanic.

Source: School Enrollment – Social and Economic Characteristics of Students: October 2007 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013391.html

Names

4

The number of Hispanic surnames ranked among the 15 most common in 2000. It was the first time that a Hispanic surname reached the top 15 during a census. Garcia was the most frequent Hispanic surname, occurring 858,289 times and placing eighth on the list — up from 18th in 1990. Rodriguez (ninth), Martinez (11th) and Hernandez (15th) were the next most common Hispanic surnames.

Source: Census 2000 Genealogy http://www.census.gov/genealogy/nas/content/live/hispanic/freqnames2k.html

Jobs

67%

Percentage of Hispanics 16 and older who were in the civilian labor force in 2007.

Source: 2007 American Community Survey http://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

18%

The percentage of Hispanics 16 or older who worked in management, professional and related occupations in 2007. The same percentage worked in production, transportation and material moving occupations. Another 16 percent worked in construction, extraction, maintenance and repair occupations. Approximately 24 percent of Hispanics 16 or older worked in service occupations; 21 percent in sales and office occupations; and 2 percent in farming, fishing and forestry occupations.

Source: 2007 American Community Survey http://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

79,400

Number of Hispanic chief executives. In addition, 50,866 physicians and surgeons; 48,720 postsecondary teachers; 38,532 lawyers; and 2,726 news analysts, reporters and correspondents are Hispanic.

Source: Upcoming Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2010, Table 603 http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/

Voting

5.6 million

The number of Hispanic citizens who reported voting in the 2006 congressional elections. The percentage of Hispanic citizens voting — about 32 percent — did not change statistically from four years earlier.

Source: Voting and Registration in the Election of November 2006 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/voting/012234.html

Serving our Country

1.1 million

The number of Hispanic veterans of the U.S. armed forces.

Source: 2007 American Community Survey http://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

Following is a list of observances typically covered by the Census Bureau’s Facts for Features series:
African-American History Month (February) Labor Day
Super Bowl Grandparents Day
Valentine’s Day (Feb. 14) Hispanic Heritage Month
Women’s History Month (March) (Sept. 15-Oct. 15)
Irish-American Heritage Month (March)/ Unmarried and Single
St. Patrick’s Day (March 17) Americans Week
Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month (May) Halloween (Oct. 31)
Older Americans Month (May) American Indian/Alaska
Cinco de Mayo (May 5) Native Heritage Month
Mother’s Day (November)
Father’s Day Veterans Day (Nov. 11)
The Fourth of July (July 4) Thanksgiving Day
Anniversary of Americans with The Holiday Season
Disabilities Act (July 26) (December)
Back to School (August)
Editor’s note: The preceding data were collected from a variety of sources and may be subject to sampling variability and other sources of error. Facts for Features are customarily released about two months before an observance in order to accommodate magazine production timelines. Questions or comments should be directed to the Census Bureau’s Public Information Office: telephone: 301-763-3030; fax: 301-763-3762; or e-mail: pio@census.gov.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau

Profile of Hispanics Online

Profile of Hispanics Online

Profile of Hispanics Online

Hispanics are entering cyberspace more quickly than other ethnic groups – Internet use jumped 7.4 percent in 2004 after an 8 percent spurt in 2003.  The typical Hispanic-American Internet user is age 28, slightly more likely to be male and unmarried, according to a study by the Association of Hispanic Advertising Agencies.  Half of all Hispanic-American Internet users are Spanish-language dominant, meaning that they speak Spanish at home more than English (Preparer’s Note: this could be attributed to their family-oriented lifestyle and may not necessarily affect the way younger Hispanics use the Internet).

This particular study found that the profile of Hispanics Online is:
• Hispanics spend almost 5-1/2 hours online weekly

• 71 percent of their usage is from a home computer

• 75% use the Internet for email

• 60% to get news

• 54% to listen to music

• 43% to chat

A March 2004 study by AOL/Roper ASW shows that 14 million Hispanics in the US are online. While this is already an impressive number, the growth rate is even more impressive. About 20% of online Hispanics had connected their households to the Internet less than six months earlier. More than half who were not yet online expected to connect within the next two years.  The more Latinos connect online, the less time they spend with other Spanish media, such as print or TV. Marketers will increasingly want to reflect this shift in media consumption in their advertising budgets.

Uncovered Facts About Online Hispanic Women and their Media Usage
Elianne Ramos is the principal and CEO of Speak Hispanic Communications and vice-chair of Communications and PR for LATISM.
never lose your sense of wonder
Social sites eclipse e-mail use
Hispanics social media marketing strategy - a must

Source: TIA

Ad Age Hispanic Advertising Awards intro [video]

2007 Ad Age Hispanic Advertising Awards – Bumpers video

Emotions experienced while watching this ad are diverse, but it definitely keeps you engaged. The message, or at least my interpretation of the message, is that most media is dead when reaching Hispanics or maybe that you really have to know what makes the market “happy” in order to reach it.

Client: Ad Age Hispanic Advertising Awards
Agency: Dieste Harmel & Partners, San Francisco
Executive Creative Director: Carlos Tourne
Senior Creative Director: Raymundo Valdez
Senior Copywriter: Alex Toedtli
Art Director: Eduardo Cintron
Agency Producer: Angel LaRiva
Production Company: Radium
Director: Brady Baltezore
Producer: Tim Pries
Music/Sound Design: The Lodge

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Hispanic girls face many obstacles to playing sports

Rosa Mendez and her mother share the same first name. In Spanish, it means “pink,” which also happens to be Rosa’s favorite color. She certainly plays it up. She pierced both ears with pink diamonds, she drives around with a pink Rosary hanging from her rearview mirror and she color-coordinates pink Nikes with her school clothes.

Hispanic women and Sports - Soccer or football

Hispanic women and Sports – Soccer or football

But hidden underneath all that girly-ness, her favorite sport — soccer — often leaves her body black and blue with bruises.

She would get so lost in playing the game she loves during her spring season at East High School in Kansas City that sometimes she had no idea how she got so beat up.

Soccer is Rosa’s passion. Or futbol, as it is called in the Mendez living room. In her home, as is the case in many traditional Latino families, futbol isn’t a sport played by girls named after delicate flowers.

“It was my idea to go play,” Rosa says, “but (my parents) would say, ‘Stay here with the kids.’ Because girls shouldn’t be playing aggressive things.”

Rosa is the daughter of a Mexican father who works 12 hours a day and a Nicaraguan mother who works on an assembly line packing boxes with bottles of salad dressing and seasoning salt. She recently completed her junior season — her first high school soccer season — as a goalkeeper for the East Bears varsity team. Largely made up of Latinas (girls of Latin-American or Spanish-speaking descent), East’s roster is similar to those at several other inner-city schools, including Renaissance Academy, Alta Vista Charter High School, Northeast and Harmon, a Kansas City, Kan., high school with a Latino student population of 54 percent.

These are daughters of northern Mexican immigrants, the first or second generation that has come here to build new lives. But while adapting to old-age American traditions, like playing for the home team, these teenage girls sometimes struggle to navigate between their own desire to compete and their family’s cultural customs.

“In the Hispanic community, girls are more likely to do something that we call ‘girly’ or art stuff,” says Antonia Saenz, whose daughter Vanessa played soccer for the Alta Vista Lady Aztecs. “Sports are mostly seen for guys. It’s aggressive. Girls are not looked upon to be strong physically. They’re actually not encouraged to.”

This isn’t simply machismo. Many community leaders suggest there are practical reasons why Latina girls are expected to stay home. Their parents may often work long hours for little pay and live in some of the poorest communities in the city. When a daughter becomes old enough, she is asked to help with the younger siblings in the house or take on a part-time job. So who really has time to play soccer when the family needs the help?

“A couple of girls miss practices because they need to baby-sit,” East co-head coach Mike Somodi says. “It’s unbelievable the things that have priorities. It’s hard to get them in the mode of thinking that (soccer) is important. They want to play…but a lot of them work.”

•••

Rosa gets more than her name from her mother. Her flowing brown hair and a smile that radiates her otherwise sad eyes, she believes, she gets from her mother as well.

“We really get along,” Rosa says. “She knows everything about me.”

But Mrs. Mendez doesn’t always understand this daughter of hers.

She’s perplexed about why Rosa is so faithful to soccer practice and to a team that didn’t win many games. She wonders why Rosa can’t stay home with her three younger siblings.

Hispanic women and Sports - Soccer or football

Hispanic women and Sports – Soccer or football

Instead of coming home after school this spring, Rosa spent five days out of the week with her East Bears. At practice, Rosa would split time barking commands and encouragements, then sacrificing her thin, 5-foot-6 1/2 -inch frame in front of a net while teammates practiced shots.

Midway through the spring season, the Bears’ starting goalkeeper — Zenadia Mendez, Rosa’s older sister — quit the team. East tried to fill the position with another player, and then Rosa got her opportunity during one game when the Bears fell behind 7-0.

“That was my first time ever, and that’s how we finished, trailing 7-0. I didn’t let anything by,” Rosa says proudly. “Nobody wanted to be goalie, so I didn’t want to pressure them to be in it. But then I got to liking it . . . I felt like I was making a difference.”

Yes, Rosa’s a tough one — and everyone on that soccer field knows it.

“During a tournament at Camdenton, she took three shots to her face,” Somodi says. “Knocked her down, but she got back up.”

Mama Mendez doesn’t exactly like her daughter getting slugged in the chops, especially in a losing effort. East lost that tournament game 2-1, by the way.

As she sits in her living room, Rosa’s mother expresses her opinions about her daughter in clear but unconfident English. “I think,” Mendez says slowly, then turns to Rosa for help in finding the right phrase. Rosa listens to her mother, who never sugarcoats her words, and interprets: “I give a lot, but I receive less.”

Rosa’s mother continues, and she needs no help to say…

“She tries very hard, she asks for shoes, she asks for permission to go to practice,” Rosa’s mother says. “And all she gets is bruises. She gets hurt sometimes. She gets frustrated. I’ve been to a couple of games and she lost, so I said, ‘It’s not worth it.’ You get hurt and you lose. Her dad, he feels the same way. But she says: ‘I like it.’ ”

•••

Rosa loves soccer because the game is her escape.

She loves her No. 4 jersey, washing it after every game and delicately hang-drying it for fear that the machine won’t get the wrinkles out just right. She loves being around her teammates, in the back of the bus, cracking jokes on the way to a game. She’d do anything for those girls and one day hopes to get matching soccer tattoos with teammate Brandi Roos.

She caught the soccer passion at a young age. When she wasn’t watching Mexican League games on the living room television, she was tagging along to Sheffield Park to watch her father, Arturo, play goalie on a team made up of friends and family. She remembers watching her father and thinking: I want to play, too.

Now that she’s playing again for the first time in three years, Rosa can’t decide whether it’s the game she loves so much or just the freedom it gives her.

She used to play all the time, in the streets and for a James Elementary school team.

“When in elementary school,” Rosa’s mother says, “she wanted to play and I let her play. I did.”

But as Rosa got older, she took on more responsibilities at home. It is this very role — burgeoning homemaker — that community member Raquel Daldalian has found common among young Latinas. Daldalian points out that not all Latino families can be lumped together, but in her talks with a group of Hispanic girls from Northeast High School, their stories are all too common.

“Generally, the girls in a Latino family are expected to know how to cook and clean; that’s their main objectives,” says Daldalian, a Project Safe Prevention specialist at the Rose Brooks Center. “They are told if they don’t do these things, they won’t find a man. They’re not expected to go to school, and sports are at the bottom of the barrel.”

In Nicaragua, Mendez did not play organized sports, but she enjoyed active days as a little girl. Mendez grew up playing made-up games around her neighborhood that constituted a lot of running and chasing. She smiles when recalling those days, when she was just a girl and the focus of her life was games the neighborhood kids would dream up.

But when her mother moved the family to America, Mendez had to put away her childhood.

Rosa will be 17 soon and, like most typical teenage girls, she cherishes her cell phone and boyfriend. At 17, her mother was working eight-hour days packing tomatoes in Kansas City, Kan.

These days, Rosa is looking forward to her senior year. But at that same age, Rosa’s mother already was a high school dropout. There was no escape with soccer, as there is now for her daughter.

“It wasn’t a sacrifice,” Rosa’s mother says of her five-day-a-week work schedule. “I just had to help my mom.”

She met Arturo Mendez in 1989, and the couple married six months later. They’re raising their six children in the same three-bedroom house on Wheeling Avenue that they’ve lived in since starting a family. Both Mom and Dad want to see their children leave this place and surpass them.

Mrs. Mendez has a simple goal for Rosa — stay in school.

“My husband and I never got to finish school,” Mendez says. “We know how hard it is. …Our jobs depend on how strong we are. Not how smart we are.”

Although Mendez wants the best for her daughter, she is hesitant to follow Rosa’s passion for soccer.

“Sometimes,” Mendez sighs. “I don’t understand.

“If she likes playing soccer and (can) handle school and sports, it’s all right. (But) in my country, I’ve never seen girls in sports. To be honest, I’ve never seen girls with a medal.”

•••

The lack of importance associated with organized sports is evident in the Latinas who do play. Their families often cannot afford to send their children to youth leagues that would develop their skills. As a result, varsity soccer at schools like East and Alta Vista can be a rough sketch of what the game is actually supposed to look like.

Alta Vista coach Greg Brenner, a Mexican American, took over the varsity squad this spring and inherited 17 Latinas. Many of them did not know how to properly kick a soccer ball.

“I saw them play, and they looked like they were playing in slow motion,” Brenner says. “I kind of expected that, ‘Hey, you’re Hispanic. Aren’t you born with a soccer ball attached to you?’ But I worked with a boys team and saw the same thing. Socioeconomics come in … they don’t have time or money to play soccer.”

The reality for Rosa Mendez is that she has better things to be doing right now. She could use the money from her part-time job at Wendy’s to offset some of the expenses of her upcoming senior year. And on her off days, she could find herself watching her three younger siblings run around the house during summer vacation. But she wants to keep playing soccer.

She’s found a street team named Hidalgo and minds the net this summer. When Rosa recently asked her mother whether she could play, this time ¿Por que? (Why?) was not the response.

Her parents have come to understand why Rosa wants to play this game. Even as she struggles to explain the love herself.

“I’m not sure if it’s because of my dad or just the feeling of the game — when you make a goal or when you have the ball and you’re taking it up the field. I don’t know if it’s just being out or, ya know, it’s soccer,” Rosa says. “Everything about soccer. Working as a team. Even in goal, just slapping the ball…it’s probably the adrenaline. Everything.”

Source: Candace Buckner – The Kansas City Star

The Proposal with Bullock and Reynolds Depicts Real Life

Majority of U.S. Singles Would Have Green Card Wedding; High Percentage of Single Online Daters Would Marry Foreign Strangers for Cash

Hispanics Polled on Love

Hispanics Polled on Love

MIAMI BEACH, Fla., June 28 /PRNewswire/ — In The Proposal, last week’s #1 movie in America, Sandra Bullock is a Canadian in need of a Green Card, and so she gets engaged to her American assistant, played by Ryan Reynolds. Are Green Card marriages really that prevalent in today’s day and age? Last month, leading online dating websites Date.com (http://www.date.com), Matchmaker.com (http://www.matchmaker.com), and Amor.com (http://www.amor.com), polled their members to see if they would walk down the aisle for reasons other than love.

The majority of U.S. male and female singles, ranging in ages from 18 – 55+, voted yes to a sham marriage so that a foreigner could remain in the Country; a high percentage said they would be willing to marry strangers for cash. Surprisingly, the majority of men would marry a complete stranger who they’ve only met via a blind date, while the majority of women would marry an ex-boyfriend.

“With so many Americans affected by the recession, we’re not surprised to see that many single online daters would be willing to trade the sanctity of marriage for money,” said Shira Zwebner, Relationship Advisor for Date.com, Matchmaker.com and Amor.com.”

In a new survey of thousands of online daters nationwide, we asked: Sandra Bullock and Ryan Reynolds star in The Proposal, a movie about a US citizen engaged to his Canadian boss so she can stay in the Country and get her Green Card. Would you marry someone so they could stay in The United States?

Following are the complete results:
Men Women
Yes 58.8% 60.9%
No 29.4% 34.8%
We also asked: If you would be willing to have a Green Card marriage, who would you wed so that they could stay in the Country?

Following are the complete results:
Men Women
A blind date 29.6% 11.1%
An ex-boyfriend/girlfriend 14.8% 22.2%
My best friend’s relative 11.1% 20.6%
A stranger for cash 14.8% 16.7%
My boss 8.4% 10.3%
Gay friend’s lover 3.7% 1.0%
Source: Avalanche, LLC

Dr Pepper Ads, Tour Target Young Latinos

Dr Pepper Snapple Group this week is launching “Vida23,” a multifaceted effort to attract young Hispanic consumers to its Dr Pepper beverage.

“Just like the unique 23 flavors in Dr Pepper, Vida23 is designed to give consumers more out of every day,” said Monica Morales, Dr Pepper brand manager for the Hispanic market, in a statement. “Hispanic young adults are living the best of both worlds: they’re bicultural and bilingual. Unlike previous generations, today’s young Latinos literally have one foot in each culture and Vida23 celebrates their way of life.”

TV and radio spots will kick off the campaign, with Dr Pepper ads featuring a song created specifically for the effort, called “La La La Life/Vida23.” The song was written and performed by Cucu Diamantes and Andres Levin, founder of the band Yerba Buena. The song is available for download at www.vida23.com, the Web site for the campaign. Here, consumers can also re-mix their own of the song, and download ringtones as well.

Dr Pepper Vida23 - Dr Pepper ads

Dr Pepper Vida23 – Dr Pepper ads

Spanish language TV spots will air in Dallas, Los Angeles, San Antonio, Texas, and Sacramento, Calif., on Latino targeted Telemundo, Univision and MTV3. Radio airs in those markets, along with Chicago, Houston, Phoenix, Fresno, Calif., El Paso and Austin Texas. The radio stations were chosen for their reach to 18- to 34-year-old bicultural and bilingual Hispanic consumers.

Agency Lopez Negrete in Houston is handling.

A Southwest regional tour, starting this week and featuring a mobile dance club, also supports. Consumers will be able to play games, dance and upload photographs when the mobile “Club23” visits Dallas, Los Angeles, San Antonio, Phoenix, Fresno and Stockton, Calif. Other efforts tying into the campaign include two sweepstakes: “Tu Ride23,” for a chance to win a new vehicle; and “Familia23” for a chance to win a family fiesta.

“The young Hispanic consumer drives a large share of volume for Dr Pepper,” said Morales. “The Hispanic population is already large and expected to reach 60 million by 2020, growing three times faster than non-Hispanics. This program is aimed to connect with . . . Latino consumers, and invite them to revel in life to the 23rd power.”

Heartache quote

Heartache quote

Source: Adweek -Yana Polikarpov