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Seventeen Magazine and Bank of America Partner To Reveal Teens’ Anxieties About the Economy

Results give key insight into teens and their money worries

Latina Teens

Latina Teens

As back-to-school approaches, teens have lots on their minds – from classes to social calendars. If that weren’t enough, teens – especially girls — are also stressed out about the economy and money matters, according to a new survey from Seventeen magazine and Bank of America that explores teens’ saving and spending habits.

Most teens are stressed about money, but teen girls are feeling slightly more anxious in today’s climate than boys, with more than eight in ten girls (85%) saying they’re worried about the economy, vs. 75% of teen boys. And nearly nine of ten girls (88%) say they’re fretting about money, vs. 82% of teen boys, according to the survey.

Girls’ fears range from not having enough cash to pay for things they want — like lip gloss and mini dresses — to how to pay for college, to having money to hang out with friends. Teen girls are more likely to be stressed about college funding than teen boys, with more than two-thirds of girls (69%) saying they’re frazzled about paying for education costs, vs. 59% of teen boys.

“Teens are largely recession-proof. They are still buying clothes, beauty products and entertainment. But they can’t avoid the larger cultural anxiety about the economy,” says Seventeen editor-in-chief Ann Shoket. “It’s our job to calm their fears and help them to make smart decisions about their money so they can grow into fiscally responsible adults.”

Two out of three girls say they save some cash, but admit it’s not enough, according to the survey. Girls also say they’re better at spending than stashing, and only one in three (34%) believe they’re in total control of their finances. The Seventeen magazine and Bank of America survey also revealed that when given a choice, teen girls are more likely to choose fun over finances. Notably, if given $100 for their birthday, 55% of teen girls say they would spend it on clothes, while 45% would save it for college.

Regardless of financial anxieties, the large majority of teen girls (76%) are still optimistic about their future and their ability to support themselves as adults. More than eight in ten girls (82%) think they’ll be better off than their parents some day. Nearly two-thirds (64%) of girls says they’d rather have a career that makes a difference over one that makes a lot of money.

“Teen attitudes about spending and saving mirror what all consumers are feeling,” says Beverly Ladley, Customer Strategy Executive at Bank of America. “While their parents still largely support them, teens are interested in learning how to become more financially independent and make smarter decisions about money — and we have the opportunity to help them.”

Other findings from the survey:

  • Nearly half (45%) of teens say their parents are worrying/fighting about money more often lately.
  • Four in 10 teens (38%) have had to alter their college plans in some way because of the current economic downturn, while one in five have had to either go with their second choice of because of cost or attend a state school instead of a private one in order to save money.
  • A large portion of teens have changed their spending habits as a result of the economy (65%); this is especially true among Hispanic teens (75%).

Methodology:

The research, conducted in April, surveyed 2,000 teens in the U.S. ages 16 to 21.

ABOUT SEVENTEEN:

Seventeen reaches more than 13 million readers every month and is today’s largest selling teen beauty and fashion magazine. Seventeen is published by Hearst Magazines, a unit of Hearst Corporation (www.hearst.com) and one of the world’s largest publishers of monthly magazines, with a total of 19 U.S. titles and nearly 200 international editions. Hearst Magazines reaches more adults in the U.S. than any other publisher of monthly magazines (73.4 million according to MRI, fall 2006). The company also publishes 19 magazines in the United Kingdom through its wholly owned subsidiary, The National Magazine Company Limited.

ABOUT BANK OF AMERICA:

Bank of America is one of the world’s largest financial institutions, serving approximately 55 million consumer and small business relationships with more than 6,100 retail banking offices, more than 18,500 ATMs and award-winning online banking with nearly 30 million active users. Bank of America offers industry-leading support to more than 4 million small business owners through a suite of innovative, easy-to-use online products and services. Bank of America is among the world’s leading wealth management companies and serves clients in more than 150 countries.

Source: Hearst Magazines

Hispanic unemployment rate in California exceeding AA

Hispanic unemployment rate in California exceeds that of blacks

Hispanic unemployment rate in California exceeds that of blacks

Hispanic unemployment in California, which has been rising rapidly, reached 15.7% in the quarter ending June 30, exceeding African American joblessness for the first time in the current economic downturn, according to a new analysis.
The state’s Latino unemployment is projected to hit nearly 18% a year from now, says the report released Monday by the Economic Policy Institute, a Washington-based think tank.

Nationally, black unemployment continues to surpass Hispanic joblessness and that pattern is not expected to change soon, according to Algernon Austin, the study’s author. Still, across the country, unemployment among Hispanics has increased faster than for other groups.

Among 12 states with enough data to compare unemployment by ethnicity, California is the only one where Hispanic joblessness leads all other groups.

“One thing that is driving the Hispanic unemployment rate is the collapse of the housing market, which means the collapse of construction,” Austin said. “That has been a big factor.”

But in California, it is Hispanic women who appear to be tipping the unemployment scales. Latino female unemployment began overtaking that of black women earlier this year, according to Austin’s data. Black males still have higher unemployment in the state than Hispanic males. “Construction is certainly part of the story,” he said, “but I don’t think it’s the full story” of Latino job losses.

As the recession took hold in late 2007, black unemployment in California was 9.8%, compared with 7% for Hispanics and 4.6% for whites, the report says. For the second quarter of this year, black unemployment is estimated at 15.3% — slightly less than Hispanics — and white unemployment was 8.6%.

Source: L.A. Times – Rich Connell

What will the U.S. look like in 2050?

U.S. Population Projections: 2005–2050 - What will the U.S. look like in 2050?

U.S. Population Projections: 2005–2050 – What will the U.S. look like in 2050?

U.S. Population Projections: 2005–2050

What will the U.S. look like in 2050? Population and Immigration

Between 2005 and 2050, the nation’s population will increase to 438 million from 296 million, a rise of 142 million people that represents growth of 48%.

Immigrants who arrive after 2005, and their U.S.-born descendants, account for 82% of the projected national population increase during the 2005–2050 period.

Of  the 117 additional people attributable to the effect of new immigration, 67 million will be the immigrants themselves and 50 million will be their U.S.-born children and grandchildren

The nation’s foreign-born population, 36 million in 2005, is projected to rise to 81 million in 2050, growth of 129%.

In 2050, nearly one in five Americans (19%) will be an immigrant, compared with one in eight now (12% in 2005).

• The foreign-born share of the nation’s population will exceed historic highs sometime between 2020 and 2025, when it reaches 15%. The historic peak share was 14.7% in 1910 and 14.8% in 1890.

• Births in the United States will play a growing role in Hispanic and Asian population growth, so a diminishing proportion of both groups will be foreign-born.

What will the U.S. look like in 2050? Racial and Ethnic Groups

• The Hispanic population, 42 million in 2005, will rise to 128 million in 2050, tripling in size. Latinos will be 29% of the population, compared with 14% in 2005. Latinos will account for 60% of the nation’s population growth from 2005 to 2050.

• The black population, 38 million in 2005, will grow to 59 million in 2050, a rise of 56%. In 2050, the nation’s population will be 13.4% black, compared with 12.8% in 2005.

• The Asian population, 14 million in 2005, will grow to 41 million in 2050, nearly tripling in size. In 2050, the nation’s population will be 9% Asian, compared with 5% in 2005. Most Asians in the United States were foreign born in 2005 (58%), but by 2050, fewer than half (47%) will be.

• The white, non-Hispanic population, 199 million in 2005, will grow to 207 million in 2050, a 4% increase. In 2050, 47% of the U.S. population will be non-Hispanic white, compared with 67% in 2005.

What will the U.S. look like in 2050? Age Groups

• The working-age population—adults ages 18 to 64—will reach 255 million in 2050, up from 186 million in 2005. This segment will grow more slowly over the projection period (37%) than the overall population. Future immigrants and their descendants will account for all growth in this group.

• Among working-age adults, the foreign-born share, 15% in 2005, will rise to 23% in 2050. The Hispanic share, 14% in 2005, will increase to 31% in 2050. The non-Hispanic white share, 68% in 2005, will decline to 45% in 2050.

• The nation’s population of children ages 17 and younger will rise to 102 million in 2050, up from 73 million in 2005. The child population will grow more slowly in future decades (39%) than will the overall population. Future immigrants and their descendants will account for all growth in this population segment.

• Among children, the share who are immigrants or who have an immigrant parent will rise to 34% in 2050 from 23% in 2005. The share of children who are Hispanic, 20% in 2005, will rise to 35% in 2050. Non-Hispanic whites, who make up 59% of today’s children, will be 40% of children in 2050.

• The nation’s elderly population— people ages 65 and older—will grow to 81 million in 2050, up from 37 million in 2005. This group will grow more rapidly than the overall population, so its share will increase to 19% in 2050, from 12% in 2005. Immigration will account for only a small part of that growth.

• The dependency ratio—the number of people of working age, compared with the number of young and elderly—will rise sharply, mainly because of growth in the elderly population. There were 59 children and elderly people per 100 adults of working age in 2005. That will rise to 72 dependents per 100 adults of working age in 2050.

What will the U.S. look like in 2050? Alternative Projection Scenarios

• Under a lower-immigration scenario, the total population would rise to 384 million, the foreign-born share would stabilize at 13% and the Hispanic share would go up to 26% in 2050.

• Under a higher-immigration scenario, the total population would rise to 496 million, the foreign-born share would rise to 23% and the Hispanic share would go up to 32% in 2050.

• Under a lower- or higher-immigration scenario, the dependency ratio would range from 75 dependents per 100 people of working age to 69 dependents per 100 people of working age. Both of these ratios are well above the current value of 59 dependents per 100 people of working age.

Estimates of the Unauthorized Immigrant Population 2010 - Pew Hispanic
Let's talk about Salvadorans
Have you heard about Cubans?
What are Puerto Ricans like?
Accessing of social networking sites or blogs also saw significant growth, increasing 2.6 percentage points to 20.8 percent of mobile subscribers.

Source: Pew Research Center – 2008

Seventeen Magazine and Bank of America Partner To Reveal Teens’ Anxieties About the Economy

Results give key insight into teens and their money worries

Latina Teens

Latina Teens

As back-to-school approaches, teens have lots on their minds – from classes to social calendars. If that weren’t enough, teens – especially girls — are also stressed out about the economy and money matters, according to a new survey from Seventeen magazine and Bank of America that explores teens’ saving and spending habits.

Most teens are stressed about money, but teen girls are feeling slightly more anxious in today’s climate than boys, with more than eight in ten girls (85%) saying they’re worried about the economy, vs. 75% of teen boys. And nearly nine of ten girls (88%) say they’re fretting about money, vs. 82% of teen boys, according to the survey.

Girls’ fears range from not having enough cash to pay for things they want — like lip gloss and mini dresses — to how to pay for college, to having money to hang out with friends. Teen girls are more likely to be stressed about college funding than teen boys, with more than two-thirds of girls (69%) saying they’re frazzled about paying for education costs, vs. 59% of teen boys.

“Teens are largely recession-proof. They are still buying clothes, beauty products and entertainment. But they can’t avoid the larger cultural anxiety about the economy,” says Seventeen editor-in-chief Ann Shoket. “It’s our job to calm their fears and help them to make smart decisions about their money so they can grow into fiscally responsible adults.”

Two out of three girls say they save some cash, but admit it’s not enough, according to the survey. Girls also say they’re better at spending than stashing, and only one in three (34%) believe they’re in total control of their finances. The Seventeen magazine and Bank of America survey also revealed that when given a choice, teen girls are more likely to choose fun over finances. Notably, if given $100 for their birthday, 55% of teen girls say they would spend it on clothes, while 45% would save it for college.

Regardless of financial anxieties, the large majority of teen girls (76%) are still optimistic about their future and their ability to support themselves as adults. More than eight in ten girls (82%) think they’ll be better off than their parents some day. Nearly two-thirds (64%) of girls says they’d rather have a career that makes a difference over one that makes a lot of money.

“Teen attitudes about spending and saving mirror what all consumers are feeling,” says Beverly Ladley, Customer Strategy Executive at Bank of America. “While their parents still largely support them, teens are interested in learning how to become more financially independent and make smarter decisions about money — and we have the opportunity to help them.”

Other findings from the survey:

  • Nearly half (45%) of teens say their parents are worrying/fighting about money more often lately.
  • Four in 10 teens (38%) have had to alter their college plans in some way because of the current economic downturn, while one in five have had to either go with their second choice of because of cost or attend a state school instead of a private one in order to save money.
  • A large portion of teens have changed their spending habits as a result of the economy (65%); this is especially true among Hispanic teens (75%).

Methodology:

The research, conducted in April, surveyed 2,000 teens in the U.S. ages 16 to 21.

ABOUT SEVENTEEN:

Seventeen reaches more than 13 million readers every month and is today’s largest selling teen beauty and fashion magazine. Seventeen is published by Hearst Magazines, a unit of Hearst Corporation (www.hearst.com) and one of the world’s largest publishers of monthly magazines, with a total of 19 U.S. titles and nearly 200 international editions. Hearst Magazines reaches more adults in the U.S. than any other publisher of monthly magazines (73.4 million according to MRI, fall 2006). The company also publishes 19 magazines in the United Kingdom through its wholly owned subsidiary, The National Magazine Company Limited.

ABOUT BANK OF AMERICA:

Bank of America is one of the world’s largest financial institutions, serving approximately 55 million consumer and small business relationships with more than 6,100 retail banking offices, more than 18,500 ATMs and award-winning online banking with nearly 30 million active users. Bank of America offers industry-leading support to more than 4 million small business owners through a suite of innovative, easy-to-use online products and services. Bank of America is among the world’s leading wealth management companies and serves clients in more than 150 countries.

Source: Hearst Magazines

Hispanic unemployment rate in California exceeding AA

Hispanic unemployment rate in California exceeds that of blacks

Hispanic unemployment rate in California exceeds that of blacks

Hispanic unemployment in California, which has been rising rapidly, reached 15.7% in the quarter ending June 30, exceeding African American joblessness for the first time in the current economic downturn, according to a new analysis.
The state’s Latino unemployment is projected to hit nearly 18% a year from now, says the report released Monday by the Economic Policy Institute, a Washington-based think tank.

Nationally, black unemployment continues to surpass Hispanic joblessness and that pattern is not expected to change soon, according to Algernon Austin, the study’s author. Still, across the country, unemployment among Hispanics has increased faster than for other groups.

Among 12 states with enough data to compare unemployment by ethnicity, California is the only one where Hispanic joblessness leads all other groups.

“One thing that is driving the Hispanic unemployment rate is the collapse of the housing market, which means the collapse of construction,” Austin said. “That has been a big factor.”

But in California, it is Hispanic women who appear to be tipping the unemployment scales. Latino female unemployment began overtaking that of black women earlier this year, according to Austin’s data. Black males still have higher unemployment in the state than Hispanic males. “Construction is certainly part of the story,” he said, “but I don’t think it’s the full story” of Latino job losses.

As the recession took hold in late 2007, black unemployment in California was 9.8%, compared with 7% for Hispanics and 4.6% for whites, the report says. For the second quarter of this year, black unemployment is estimated at 15.3% — slightly less than Hispanics — and white unemployment was 8.6%.

Source: L.A. Times – Rich Connell

What will the U.S. look like in 2050?

U.S. Population Projections: 2005–2050 - What will the U.S. look like in 2050?

U.S. Population Projections: 2005–2050 – What will the U.S. look like in 2050?

U.S. Population Projections: 2005–2050

What will the U.S. look like in 2050? Population and Immigration

Between 2005 and 2050, the nation’s population will increase to 438 million from 296 million, a rise of 142 million people that represents growth of 48%.

Immigrants who arrive after 2005, and their U.S.-born descendants, account for 82% of the projected national population increase during the 2005–2050 period.

Of  the 117 additional people attributable to the effect of new immigration, 67 million will be the immigrants themselves and 50 million will be their U.S.-born children and grandchildren

The nation’s foreign-born population, 36 million in 2005, is projected to rise to 81 million in 2050, growth of 129%.

In 2050, nearly one in five Americans (19%) will be an immigrant, compared with one in eight now (12% in 2005).

• The foreign-born share of the nation’s population will exceed historic highs sometime between 2020 and 2025, when it reaches 15%. The historic peak share was 14.7% in 1910 and 14.8% in 1890.

• Births in the United States will play a growing role in Hispanic and Asian population growth, so a diminishing proportion of both groups will be foreign-born.

What will the U.S. look like in 2050? Racial and Ethnic Groups

• The Hispanic population, 42 million in 2005, will rise to 128 million in 2050, tripling in size. Latinos will be 29% of the population, compared with 14% in 2005. Latinos will account for 60% of the nation’s population growth from 2005 to 2050.

• The black population, 38 million in 2005, will grow to 59 million in 2050, a rise of 56%. In 2050, the nation’s population will be 13.4% black, compared with 12.8% in 2005.

• The Asian population, 14 million in 2005, will grow to 41 million in 2050, nearly tripling in size. In 2050, the nation’s population will be 9% Asian, compared with 5% in 2005. Most Asians in the United States were foreign born in 2005 (58%), but by 2050, fewer than half (47%) will be.

• The white, non-Hispanic population, 199 million in 2005, will grow to 207 million in 2050, a 4% increase. In 2050, 47% of the U.S. population will be non-Hispanic white, compared with 67% in 2005.

What will the U.S. look like in 2050? Age Groups

• The working-age population—adults ages 18 to 64—will reach 255 million in 2050, up from 186 million in 2005. This segment will grow more slowly over the projection period (37%) than the overall population. Future immigrants and their descendants will account for all growth in this group.

• Among working-age adults, the foreign-born share, 15% in 2005, will rise to 23% in 2050. The Hispanic share, 14% in 2005, will increase to 31% in 2050. The non-Hispanic white share, 68% in 2005, will decline to 45% in 2050.

• The nation’s population of children ages 17 and younger will rise to 102 million in 2050, up from 73 million in 2005. The child population will grow more slowly in future decades (39%) than will the overall population. Future immigrants and their descendants will account for all growth in this population segment.

• Among children, the share who are immigrants or who have an immigrant parent will rise to 34% in 2050 from 23% in 2005. The share of children who are Hispanic, 20% in 2005, will rise to 35% in 2050. Non-Hispanic whites, who make up 59% of today’s children, will be 40% of children in 2050.

• The nation’s elderly population— people ages 65 and older—will grow to 81 million in 2050, up from 37 million in 2005. This group will grow more rapidly than the overall population, so its share will increase to 19% in 2050, from 12% in 2005. Immigration will account for only a small part of that growth.

• The dependency ratio—the number of people of working age, compared with the number of young and elderly—will rise sharply, mainly because of growth in the elderly population. There were 59 children and elderly people per 100 adults of working age in 2005. That will rise to 72 dependents per 100 adults of working age in 2050.

What will the U.S. look like in 2050? Alternative Projection Scenarios

• Under a lower-immigration scenario, the total population would rise to 384 million, the foreign-born share would stabilize at 13% and the Hispanic share would go up to 26% in 2050.

• Under a higher-immigration scenario, the total population would rise to 496 million, the foreign-born share would rise to 23% and the Hispanic share would go up to 32% in 2050.

• Under a lower- or higher-immigration scenario, the dependency ratio would range from 75 dependents per 100 people of working age to 69 dependents per 100 people of working age. Both of these ratios are well above the current value of 59 dependents per 100 people of working age.

Estimates of the Unauthorized Immigrant Population 2010 - Pew Hispanic
Let's talk about Salvadorans
Have you heard about Cubans?
What are Puerto Ricans like?
Accessing of social networking sites or blogs also saw significant growth, increasing 2.6 percentage points to 20.8 percent of mobile subscribers.

Source: Pew Research Center – 2008

2010 Census Promotional Videos Win Numerous Awards

A series of 2010 Census promotional videos have won several prestigious Telly Awards as well as a Videographer Award of Excellence — awards that honor the best in video production.

The videos were produced by the Public Information Office at the U.S. Census Bureau as part of a collaborative effort between headquarters, regional and contracting staff. They were submitted for consideration by contractors Therese Allen and Corey Petree.

The four- to seven-minute videos, titled “A New Portrait of America,” were produced to reach different segments of the population including the general, African-American, Asian, Hispanic, Native American/Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islanders, and Puerto Rican audiences.

In the nonbroadcast productions category, the videos received silver Tellys for use of music and editing, and a bronze Telly was awarded for government relations. In the Internet/online video category, a silver Telly was awarded for music and a bronze Telly was awarded for editing.

The videos also received the 2009 Videographer Award of Excellence in the government/federal and creativity/video/original music categories.

The New Portrait of America videos include diverse images from throughout the country as well as interviews with community leaders. They are used at activities and events to promote the 2010 Census and encourage everyones participation in next year’s national count.

The “New Portrait of America” videos may be viewed at the following link: http://2010.census.gov/2010census/multimedia/videos/013879.html.

ABOUT THE 2010 CENSUS

The 2010 Census is a count of everyone living in the United States and is mandated by the U.S. Constitution. Census data are used to distribute congressional seats to states, to distribute more than $435 billion in federal funds to local, state and tribal governments each year and to make decisions about what community services to provide. The 2010 Census questionnaire will be one of the shortest in history, consisting of 10 questions and taking about 10 minutes to complete. Strict laws protect the confidentiality of respondents and the information they provide.

Editor’s note: News releases, reports and data tables are available on the Census Bureau’s home page. Go to http://www.census.gov and click on “Releases.”

CONTACT: Public Information Office, +1-301-763-3011, pio@census.gov
Source: U.S. Census Bureau

2008 Presidential Election Voter Turnout Increases by 5MM

Data Show Significant Increases Among Hispanic, Black and Young Voters

Voter Turnout Increases by 5 Million in 2008 Presidential Election, U.S. Census Bureau Reports

Voter Turnout Increases by 5 Million in 2008 Presidential Election, U.S. Census Bureau Reports

About 131 million people reported voting in the 2008 U.S. presidential election, an increase of 5 million from 2004, according to a new table package released today by the U.S. Census Bureau. The increase included about 2 million more black voters, 2 million more Hispanic voters and about 600,000 more Asian voters, while the number of non-Hispanic white voters remained statistically unchanged.

Additionally, voters 18 to 24 were the only age group to show a statistically significant increase in turnout, reaching 49 percent in 2008 compared with 47 percent in 2004. Blacks had the highest turnout rate among 18- to 24-year-old voters — 55 percent, an 8 percent increase from 2004. The increased turnout among certain demographic groups was offset by stagnant or decreased turnout among other groups, causing overall 2008 voter turnout to remain statistically unchanged — at 64 percent — from 2004.

“The 2008 presidential election saw a significant increase in voter turnout among young people, blacks and Hispanics,” said Thom File, a voting analyst with the Census Bureau’s Housing and Household Economic Statistics Division. “But as turnout among some other demographic groups either decreased or remained unchanged, the overall 2008 voter turnout rate was not statistically different from 2004.”

The table package released today, Voting and Registration in the Election of 2008,examines the levels of voting and registration in the November 2008 presidential election, the demographic characteristics of citizens who reported that they were registered for or voted in the election, and the reasons why registered voters did not vote.

Although the youngest voters were the only age group to show a statistically significant increase in turnout, voting did tend to increase with age. In 2008, younger citizens (18-24) had the lowest voting rate (49 percent), while citizens who fell into older age groups (45-64 and 65-plus) had the highest voting rates (69 percent and 70 percent, respectively).

Looking at voter turnout by race and Hispanic origin, non-Hispanic whites (66 percent) and blacks (65 percent) had the highest levels in the November 2008 election. Voting rates for Asians and Hispanics were not statistically different from one another at about 49 percent.

Relative to the presidential election of 2004, the voting rates for blacks, Asians and Hispanics each increased by about 4 percentage points. The voting rate for non-Hispanic whites decreased by 1 percentage point.

The voting rate was highest in the Midwest (66 percent), while the rates in the West, Northeast and South were about 63 percent each.

Among states, voting rates varied widely. Among states and state-equivalents with the highest voter turnout were Minnesota and the District of Columbia, each with voting rates of about 75 percent. Hawaii and Utah were among the states with the lowest turnouts, each with approximately 52 percent.

By sex, women had a higher voting rate (66 percent) than males (62 percent). Neither was statistically different from 2004.

The overall voting age (18 and older) citizen population in the United States in 2008 was

206 million compared with 197 million in 2004. Of that total, 146 million, or 71 percent, reported being registered to vote. That’s slightly lower than the 72 percent who reported being registered to vote in the 2004 presidential election, but does represent an increase of approximately 4 million registered voters. The percentage of those registered to vote that actually did so was slightly higher in the 2008 election (90 percent) than in 2004 (89 percent).

Editor’s note: The information can be accessed at http://www.census.gov/population/nas/content/live/hispanic/socdemo/voting.html.

.These data come from the Current Population Survey. Statistics from sample surveys are subject to sampling and nonsampling error. For further information on the source of the data and accuracy of the estimates, including standard errors and confidence intervals, go to Attachment 16 of

http://www.census.gov/apsd/techdoc/cps/cpsnov08.pdf.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau

Hispanic Heritage Month: Sept. 15 – Oct. 15

Origin of the Hispanic Heritage Month

In September 1968, Congress authorized President Lyndon B. Johnson to proclaim National Hispanic Heritage Week, which was observed during the week that included Sept. 15 and Sept. 16. The observance was expanded in 1988 to a month long celebration (Sept. 15 – Oct. 15). America celebrates the culture and traditions of those who trace their roots to Spain, Mexico and the Spanish-speaking nations of Central America, South America and the Caribbean. Sept. 15 was chosen as the starting point for the celebration because it is the anniversary of independence of five Latin American countries: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. In addition, Mexico and Chile celebrate their independence days on Sept. 16 and Sept. 18, respectively.

Population

46.9 million

The estimated Hispanic population of the United States as of July 1, 2008, making people of Hispanic origin the nation’s largest ethnic or race minority. Hispanics constituted 15 percent of the nation’s total population. In addition, there are approximately 4 million residents of Puerto Rico.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html and http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013049.html

More than 1

…of every two people added to the nation’s population between July 1, 2007, and July 1, 2008, was Hispanic. There were 1.5 million Hispanics added to the population during the period.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html

3.2%

Percentage increase in the Hispanic population between July 1, 2007, and July 1, 2008, making Hispanics the fastest-growing minority group.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html

132.8 million

The projected Hispanic population of the United States on July 1, 2050. According to this projection, Hispanics will constitute 30 percent of the nation’s population by that date.

Source: Population projections http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/012496.html

22.4 million

The nation’s Hispanic population during the 1990 Census — less than half the current total.

Source: The Hispanic Population: 2000 http://www.census.gov/prod/2001pubs/c2kbr01-3.pdf

2nd

Ranking of the size of the U.S. Hispanic population worldwide, as of 2008. Only Mexico (110 million) had a larger Hispanic population than the United States (46.9 million).

Source: International Data Base http://www.census.gov/ipc/nas/content/live/hispanic/idbsum.html and population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html

64%

The percentage of Hispanic-origin people in the United States who were of Mexican background in 2007. Another 9 percent were of Puerto Rican background, with 3.5 percent Cuban, 3.1 percent Salvadoran and 2.7 percent Dominican. The remainder were of some other Central American, South American or other Hispanic or Latino origin.

Source: 2007 American Community Surveyhttp://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

About 45 percent of the nation’s Dominicans lived in New York City in 2007 and about half of the nation’s Cubans in Miami-Dade County, Fla.

Source: 2007 American Community Survey http://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

25%

Percentage of children younger than 5 who were Hispanic in 2008. All in all, Hispanics comprised 22 percent of children younger than 18.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html

27.7 years

Median age of the Hispanic population in 2008. This compared with 36.8 years for the population as a whole.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html

107

Number of Hispanic males in 2008 per every 100 Hispanic females. This was in sharp contrast to the overall population, which had 97 males per every 100 females.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html

States and Counties

48%

The percentage of the Hispanic-origin population that lived in California or Texas in 2008. California was home to 13.5 million Hispanics, and Texas was home to 8.9 million.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

16

The number of states with at least a half-million Hispanic residents — Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Massachusetts, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia and Washington.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

45%

The percentage of New Mexico’s population that was Hispanic in 2008, the highest of any state. Hispanics also made up at least one fifth of the population in California and Texas, at 37 percent each, Arizona (30 percent), Nevada (26 percent), Florida (21 percent) and Colorado (20 percent). New Mexico had 891,000 Hispanics.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

The Carolinas

The states with the highest percentage increases in Hispanic population between July 1, 2007, and July 1, 2008. South Carolina’s increase was 7.7 percent and North Carolina’s was 7.4 percent.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

4.7 million

The Hispanic population of Los Angeles County, Calif., in 2008 — the largest of any county in the nation. Los Angeles County also had the biggest numerical increase in the Hispanic population (67,000) since July 2007.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

97%

Proportion of the population of Starr County, Texas, that was Hispanic as of 2008, which led the nation. All of the top 10 counties in this category were in Texas.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

48

Number of the nation’s 3,142 counties that are majority-Hispanic.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

15%

Percent increase in the Hispanic population in Luzerne County, Pa., from July 1, 2007, to July 1, 2008. Among all counties with 2007 Hispanic populations of at least 10,000, Luzerne topped the nation in this category. Luzerne’s county seat is Wilkes-Barre.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

313,000

The increase in California’s Hispanic population between July 1, 2007, and July 1, 2008, which led all states. Texas (305,000) and Florida (111,000) also recorded large increases.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

20

Number of states in which Hispanics are the largest minority group. These states are Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Massachusetts, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, Texas, Utah, Washington and Wyoming.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

Businesses

Source for statements in this section: Hispanic-owned Firms: 2002http://www.census.gov/csd/sbo/hispanic2002.htm

1.6 million

The number of Hispanic-owned businesses in 2002.

Nearly 43 percent of Hispanic-owned firms operated in construction; administrative and support, and waste management and remediation services; and other services, such as personal services, and repair and maintenance. Retail and wholesale trade accounted for nearly 36 percent of Hispanic-owned business revenue.

Counties with the highest number of Hispanic-owned firms were Los Angeles County (188,422); Miami-Dade County (163,187); and Harris County, Texas (61,934).

Triple

The rate of growth of Hispanic-owned businesses between 1997 and 2002 (31 percent) compared with the national average (10 percent) for all businesses.

$222 billion

Revenue generated by Hispanic-owned businesses in 2002, up 19 percent from 1997.

44.6%

…of all Hispanic-owned firms were owned by people of Mexican origin (Mexican, Mexican-American or Chicano).

29,168

Number of Hispanic-owned firms with receipts of $1 million or more.

Families and Children

10.4 million

The number of Hispanic family households in the United States in 2008. Of these households, 62 percent included children younger than 18.

Source: Families and Living Arrangements http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/families_households/013378.html

66%

The percentage of Hispanic family households consisting of a married couple.

Source: Families and Living Arrangements http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/families_households/013378.html

43%

The percentage of Hispanic family households consisting of a married couple with children younger than 18.

Source: Families and Living Arrangements http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/families_households/013378.html

70%

Percentage of Hispanic children living with two parents.

Source: Families and Living Arrangements http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/families_households/013378.html

Spanish Language

35 million

The number of U.S. residents 5 and older who spoke Spanish at home in 2007. Those who hablan espanol constituted 12 percent of U.S. residents. More than half of these Spanish speakers spoke English “very well.”

Source: 2007 American Community Survey http://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

4

Number of states where at least one-in-five residents spoke Spanish at home in 2007 — Arizona, California, New Mexico and Texas.

Source: 2007 American Community Survey http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/american_community_survey_acs/012634.html

78%

Percentage of Hispanics 5 and older who spoke Spanish at home in 2007.

Source: 2007 American Community Surveyhttp://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

Income, Poverty and Health Insurance

$38,679

The median income of Hispanic households in 2007, statistically unchanged from the previous year after adjusting for inflation.

Source: Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2007 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/income_wealth/012528.html

21.5%

The poverty rate among Hispanics in 2007, up from 20.6 percent in 2006.

Source: Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2007 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/income_wealth/012528.html

32.1%

The percentage of Hispanics who lacked health insurance in 2007, down from 34.1 percent in 2006.

Source: Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2007 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/income_wealth/012528.html

Education

53%

The percentage of Hispanic 4-year-olds enrolled in nursery school in 2007, up from 43 percent in 1997 and 21 percent in 1987.

Source: School Enrollment – Social and Economic Characteristics of Students: October 2007http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013391.html

62%

The percentage of Hispanics 25 and older who had at least a high school education in 2008.

Source: Educational Attainment in the United States: 2008 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013618.html

13%

The percentage of the Hispanic population 25 and older with a bachelor’s degree or higher in 2008.

Source: Educational Attainment in the United States: 2008 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013618.html

3.6 million

The number of Hispanics 18 and older who had at least a bachelor’s degree in 2008.

Source: Educational Attainment in the United States: 2008 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013618.html

1 million

Number of Hispanics 25 and older with advanced degrees in 2008 (e.g., master’s, professional, doctorate).

Source: Educational Attainment in the United States: 2008 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013618.html

12%

Percentage of full-time college students (both undergraduate and graduate students) in October 2007 who were Hispanic, up from 10 percent in 2006.

Source: School Enrollment – Social and Economic Characteristics of Students: October 2007 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013391.html

20%

Percentage of elementary and high school students combined who were Hispanic.

Source: School Enrollment – Social and Economic Characteristics of Students: October 2007 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013391.html

Names

4

The number of Hispanic surnames ranked among the 15 most common in 2000. It was the first time that a Hispanic surname reached the top 15 during a census. Garcia was the most frequent Hispanic surname, occurring 858,289 times and placing eighth on the list — up from 18th in 1990. Rodriguez (ninth), Martinez (11th) and Hernandez (15th) were the next most common Hispanic surnames.

Source: Census 2000 Genealogy http://www.census.gov/genealogy/nas/content/live/hispanic/freqnames2k.html

Jobs

67%

Percentage of Hispanics 16 and older who were in the civilian labor force in 2007.

Source: 2007 American Community Survey http://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

18%

The percentage of Hispanics 16 or older who worked in management, professional and related occupations in 2007. The same percentage worked in production, transportation and material moving occupations. Another 16 percent worked in construction, extraction, maintenance and repair occupations. Approximately 24 percent of Hispanics 16 or older worked in service occupations; 21 percent in sales and office occupations; and 2 percent in farming, fishing and forestry occupations.

Source: 2007 American Community Survey http://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

79,400

Number of Hispanic chief executives. In addition, 50,866 physicians and surgeons; 48,720 postsecondary teachers; 38,532 lawyers; and 2,726 news analysts, reporters and correspondents are Hispanic.

Source: Upcoming Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2010, Table 603 http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/

Voting

5.6 million

The number of Hispanic citizens who reported voting in the 2006 congressional elections. The percentage of Hispanic citizens voting — about 32 percent — did not change statistically from four years earlier.

Source: Voting and Registration in the Election of November 2006 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/voting/012234.html

Serving our Country

1.1 million

The number of Hispanic veterans of the U.S. armed forces.

Source: 2007 American Community Survey http://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

Following is a list of observances typically covered by the Census Bureau’s Facts for Features series:
African-American History Month (February) Labor Day
Super Bowl Grandparents Day
Valentine’s Day (Feb. 14) Hispanic Heritage Month
Women’s History Month (March) (Sept. 15-Oct. 15)
Irish-American Heritage Month (March)/ Unmarried and Single
St. Patrick’s Day (March 17) Americans Week
Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month (May) Halloween (Oct. 31)
Older Americans Month (May) American Indian/Alaska
Cinco de Mayo (May 5) Native Heritage Month
Mother’s Day (November)
Father’s Day Veterans Day (Nov. 11)
The Fourth of July (July 4) Thanksgiving Day
Anniversary of Americans with The Holiday Season
Disabilities Act (July 26) (December)
Back to School (August)
Editor’s note: The preceding data were collected from a variety of sources and may be subject to sampling variability and other sources of error. Facts for Features are customarily released about two months before an observance in order to accommodate magazine production timelines. Questions or comments should be directed to the Census Bureau’s Public Information Office: telephone: 301-763-3030; fax: 301-763-3762; or e-mail: pio@census.gov.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau

Hispanic Purchasing Power is world’s 9th biggest economy

U.S. Hispanic Purchasing Power

U.S. Hispanic Purchasing Power

The nation’s largest minority group controlled $686 billion in spending in 2004, the University of Georgia’s Selig Center for Economic Growth concluded, and the Hispanic purchasing power comprises the world’s ninth biggest economy. It’s larger than the GNP of Brazil, Spain or Mexico, reported the Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility.  Hispanic purchasing power is projected to reach as much as $1 trillion by next year (2010).

The main drivers of the surge in Hispanic consumer influence are education levels, labor force composition, household characteristics and accumulation of wealth.

Advertising expenditures aimed at U.S. Hispanics have grown while the overall ad market has slowed down. From 2000-2004, Latino-directed budgets from the top 50 advertisers rose from $658 million to $1.23 billion, or 87%. Major players such as Procter & Gamble, General Motors, McDonald’s and Coca-Cola have continually increased the amount they spend to reach this coveted market, which is becoming more desirable in terms of sheer numbers and economic clout.
• U.S. Hispanic purchasing power posted a compound annual growth rate of 7.7%

• Higher paying managerial and professional jobs are the fastest-growing occupational categories for Hispanics

• California and Texas account for more than 34 percent of all Hispanic purchasing power and nearly half of the entire U.S. Hispanic population

Source: TIA

The Younger, Hipper Hispanic

The younger, hipper Hispanic target is most likely native-born in the US and differs greatly in their consumer behavior from older/immigrant Hispanics – they speak English fluently and tend to be familiar with main-stream American culture and have similar buying habits to whites, AA and other non-Hispanics.

The Younger, Hipper Hispanic

The Younger, Hipper Hispanic

Young blacks and Hispanic college graduates are reviving cities.  They live in funky row houses and apartments in old neighborhoods that have been spruced up.  They’re part of the ‘Bohemian Mix,’ a cluster that has a substantial percentage of blacks and Hispanics.  It’s the most affluent of the racially and ethnically diverse groups.  Bohemians socialize across racial lines, jog, shop at Banana Republic, read Vanity Fair, watch Friends and drive Audis.

Of note regarding youth in general: “Youth Digerati” (as opposed to the old nickname “Youth Literati”), an ethnically mixed group, is the most affluent urban cluster.  Young Digerati tend to live in fashionable neighborhoods and are now more affluent than “Money & Brains” – older professional couples who have few children and own homes in upscale city neighborhoods.
Source: TIA

Profile of Hispanics Online

Profile of Hispanics Online

Profile of Hispanics Online

Hispanics are entering cyberspace more quickly than other ethnic groups – Internet use jumped 7.4 percent in 2004 after an 8 percent spurt in 2003.  The typical Hispanic-American Internet user is age 28, slightly more likely to be male and unmarried, according to a study by the Association of Hispanic Advertising Agencies.  Half of all Hispanic-American Internet users are Spanish-language dominant, meaning that they speak Spanish at home more than English (Preparer’s Note: this could be attributed to their family-oriented lifestyle and may not necessarily affect the way younger Hispanics use the Internet).

This particular study found that the profile of Hispanics Online is:
• Hispanics spend almost 5-1/2 hours online weekly

• 71 percent of their usage is from a home computer

• 75% use the Internet for email

• 60% to get news

• 54% to listen to music

• 43% to chat

A March 2004 study by AOL/Roper ASW shows that 14 million Hispanics in the US are online. While this is already an impressive number, the growth rate is even more impressive. About 20% of online Hispanics had connected their households to the Internet less than six months earlier. More than half who were not yet online expected to connect within the next two years.  The more Latinos connect online, the less time they spend with other Spanish media, such as print or TV. Marketers will increasingly want to reflect this shift in media consumption in their advertising budgets.

Uncovered Facts About Online Hispanic Women and their Media Usage
Elianne Ramos is the principal and CEO of Speak Hispanic Communications and vice-chair of Communications and PR for LATISM.
never lose your sense of wonder
Social sites eclipse e-mail use

Source: TIA

Today’s Hispanic Consumer

When targeting the multicultural market, race and ethnicity are becoming less important than education, income, home ownership, age and lifestyles.  Hispanics, African-Americans and Asian-Americans are moving to middle-class suburbs and prosperous neighborhoods, and are identified more by their lifestyles and spending habits than by their ancestry.

Today's Hispanic Consumer - Hispanic Marketing Basics

Today’s Hispanic Consumer – Hispanic Marketing Basics

The composition of the Hispanic population is shifting.  Hispanics now account for 13.7% of the total population.  The “new dynamics” of the Hispanic market hinge on the emerging second and third generations, native- and foreign-born differences, and broad geographic growth.

According to a Census Bureau report released in June 2004, an estimated 39.8 million Latinos live in the U.S., an increase of almost 13% since the 2000 Census. It projects Hispanics will increase their ranks by 188% to 102.6 million—or roughly one-quarter of the population—by 2050.  Hispanics will count for nearly one out of every five U.S. residents by 2012 if current growth rates continue.

The Hispanic Consumer now constitutes the largest minority group in the United States, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, comprising 13 percent of the population, or 39 million people. Moreover, their buying power has nearly tripled, from $222 billion in 1990 to $653 billion in 2003, according to a University of Georgia report.

The spending power of the U.S. Hispanic Consumer is also increasing.  The median income of Hispanic households rose 20 percent from $27,977 to $33,565 between 1996 and 2001, while the median for all U.S. households climbed just 6 percent.

“Whether a Latino household wants to buy a lawn mower has less to do with their ethnicity than if they happen to be homeowners,” says Michael Mancini of Claritas. The two great forces, age and diversity, have rendered the traditional marketing categories irrelevant in many cases.

One of the most common mistakes advertising executives make when marketing to a Hispanic consumer is assuming that the U.S. Hispanic population is homogeneous.
Source: TIA