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Strategic Alliance Between Televisa and Genomma Lab

Grupo Televisa, S.A.B. (“Televisa”; NYSE: TV; BMV: TLEVISA CPO) and Genomma Lab Internacional, S.A.B. de C.V. (“Genomma Lab”; BMV: LAB B) announced today that they have signed a strategic alliance agreement to sell and distribute personal care and over the counter pharmaceuticals in the United States and Puerto Rico.

The strategic alliance will operate through Televisa Consumer Products USA (“TCP”) a company owned 51% by Televisa and 49% by Genomma Lab. The sale and distribution of Genomma Lab’s products will be an integral part of the activities of TCP.

As part of this alliance, TCP will enter into, among others, a product supply agreement with Genomma Lab. Televisa will make available its different media platforms in the United States and Puerto Rico to TCP, which will provide Genomma Lab’s brands with significant advertising in the targeted markets in line with Genomma Lab’s business model.

This will enable Genomma Lab to expand the extensive success of its brands beyond Mexico and Latin America by accessing a Hispanic market of approximately 50 million consumers with a purchasing power of over $870 billion annually while leveraging off of Televisa’s reach and name recognition in the Hispanic market.

Subject to certain conditions, the parties contemplate closing the transaction in the following months and launching operations by year end.

About Grupo Televisa, S.A.B

Grupo Televisa, S.A.B., is the largest media company in the Spanish-speaking world and a major participant in the international entertainment business. It has interests in television production and broadcasting, production of pay-television networks, international distribution of television programming, direct to home satellite services, cable television and telecommunication services, magazine publishing and publishing distribution, radio production and broadcasting, professional sports and live entertainment, feature-film production and distribution, the operation of an internet portal, and gaming. Grupo Televisa also owns an unconsolidated equity stake in La Sexta, a free-to-air television venture in Spain.

 

About Genomma Lab Internacional, S.A.B. de C.V.

Genomma Lab Internacional, S.A.B. de C.V. is one of the fastest growing pharmaceutical and personal care products companies in Mexico and has an increasing presence in the international markets. Genomma Lab develops, sells and markets a broad range of premium branded products, many of which are leaders in the categories in which they compete in terms of sales and market share. The Company has significantly grown its revenue and profitability through a combination of a successful new product development process, consumer-oriented marketing, a broad retail distribution network and a low-cost, highly flexible operating model.

Source: Genomma Lab Internacional, S.A.B. de C.V.

Aflac Launches ‘Soccer’ – Its 8th New Television Ad for 2009

National Campaign Focuses on Family and Financial Security

Aflac launches TV commercial for Hispanics

Aflac launches TV commercial for Hispanics

Aflac today unveiled its eighth new television commercial of 2009, titled “Soccer.” This commercial showcases the Aflac Duck as the web-footed star of the team, who helps provide a solid defense against unexpected medical bills. “Soccer” will debut on August 24, running nationally on CBS, ABC, FOX, NBC, CNN, CNBC, Discover Channel, USA, Headline News and the History Channel.

Aflac Launches ‘Soccer’ – Its Eighth New Television Ad for 2009

“Soccer” presents two mothers, one of whom is using crutches, chatting about insurance while watching their kids play soccer. Soaring acrobatically in and out of frame, the Aflac Duck protects the mothers from harm while letting them know that it is Aflac that pays cash when someone is sick or hurt.

After bending one like Beckham to score a gravity-defying goal, the Aflac Duck celebrates with a victory dance while singing “Aflac, Aflac, Aflaaaac,” much to the surprise of one familiar fan.

“Aflac protects families during uncertain times and ‘Soccer’ drives that point home in a way that will resonate with consumers,” Jeff Charney, Aflac senior vice president and chief marketing officer (CMO) said. “We combined the classic family activity — the Saturday morning soccer game — with the Aflac Duck’s unmatched brand of humor, to effectively remind people that Aflac has you under our wing.”

This is the 46th commercial starring the Aflac Duck and marks the first time Aflac has introduced eight television ads in a single year. The corporate spokesduck is a well-known fundraiser for pediatric cancer-related causes and was named to the Advertising Walk of Fame in 2004. On January 1, 2010, the Aflac Duck will mark its 10th birthday as the company celebrates its 55th year serving American consumers.

Source: Aflac

Adult Vaccination Levels Lag

Young Adults Unaware of Threat of Infectious Disease and the Availability of Preventive Vaccines

Experts Call for Increased Awareness and Vaccination Rates Among All Adults

CDC Unveils New Vaccination Data Showing Continuing Need to Improve Rates

Young adults may have grown up in an era of information overload, but they have alarmingly little awareness of the risks of vaccine-preventable diseases and the need to keep up with vaccinations into adulthood, new data show.

For example, 84 percent of Americans over the age of 50 know that tetanus causes lockjaw and that they need to get a tetanus shot every 10 years. By contrast, just 49 percent of young adults aged 18 to 26 are aware of that fact, according to a survey commissioned by the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID).

“Unless all adults, and young adults in particular, get more savvy and keep up with recommended immunizations, the nation could be vulnerable to outbreaks of vaccine-preventable disease down the road,” warned William Schaffner, MD, president-elect of NFID and chairman of the Department of Preventive Medicine at Vanderbilt University, at a news conference attended by top U.S. public health officials and other medical experts. All underscored the importance of vaccination throughout the lifespan of an individual, not just in childhood.

Experts say that overall lack of awareness and knowledge among adults runs parallel to lower vaccination levels. According to the latest National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) released by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), while we are seeing positive movement in some adult vaccination levels, rates still lag behind national targets across the board.

“Just as we prioritize protecting children with vaccines, we must also prioritize vaccination of adults as part of optimal preventive care,” said Assistant U.S. Surgeon General and director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases Anne Schuchat, MD. “Adult immunization saves lives, prevents illness and will help us rein in the cost of healthcare by keeping the nation healthy.”

NFID’s medical director, Susan J. Rehm, MD, vice chair of the Department of Infectious Disease at the Cleveland Clinic, unveiled the NFID survey data showing that fewer than half of all American adults are “extremely or very familiar” with a number of vaccine-preventable diseases that can cause severe illness or death. To highlight this, just 20 percent of those surveyed were aware of pneumococcal disease, a vaccine-preventable disease that kills up to 4,500 adults in the U.S. every year.

Of special concern, experts said, is the lack of knowledge and awareness among young adults aged 18 to 26. For example, just 30 percent of young adults know that flu, which can be prevented with a vaccine, kills more Americans than any other vaccine-preventable disease. By contrast, 59 percent of adults over the age of 50 are aware of that fact, the survey found.

“This pattern is not surprising,” said Dr. Rehm. “Our childhood vaccination program is so successful that adolescents cross into young adulthood having been extremely well protected against vaccine-preventable diseases and therefore have little or no personal experience with them. This may signal trouble in the future. As these young adults go on to have their own families, if they don’t realize the importance of getting vaccinated for themselves, they may not prioritize it for their children either. That could make outbreaks of many vaccine-preventable diseases possible again.”

NFID, which has long advocated for optimal use of all vaccines recommended by public health officials, has embarked on a campaign to raise public awareness about the need for adults – including young adults – to keep up with immunizations after childhood. (For a list of diseases and vaccines, go to www.adultvaccination.org.)

Adult Vaccination Levels Lag

The latest data from CDC show that there are still too few Americans taking advantage of vaccines recommended to protect them from infectious diseases. Influenza and pneumococcal vaccination levels remain at 66.6 percent and 60 percent, respectively, for those over age 65. Other adult vaccination levels are lower – 6.7 percent for shingles in those 60 and older; about 10 percent for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in women 19 to 26 years of age and about 15 percent for Tdap in those 19 to 64 years of age.

It should be noted that Tdap booster is recommended in place of one tetanus-diphtheria (Td) booster vaccine, which is recommended every 10 years. Since Tdap has only been licensed since June 10, 2005, a substantial portion of the population has not yet reached the 10-year timing milestone since their last Td vaccine. The coverage level for any Td-containing vaccine is 64 percent for those 19 to 49 years of age, 63 percent for those 50 to 64 years of age and 52 percent for those 65 and older.

While influenza and pneumococcal vaccination levels are highest and have remained somewhat steady, these rates are disappointing, because influenza and pneumococcal vaccines have long been a part of the adult schedule and the coverage goal is 90 percent. Also of concern are racial and ethnic disparities in coverage levels in people 65 and older. Influenza coverage level in non-Hispanic whites in this age group is above the national average at 69 percent, while the rates for non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanic persons 65-plus are well below at 53 percent and 51 percent, respectively. Similarly, for pneumococcal disease, whites 65-plus have higher coverage levels than non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics at 64 percent, 44 percent and 36 percent, respectively.

“Immunity is a lifetime continuum and should be the goal for all adults as part of good preventive care and wellness,” said Dr. Schuchat. “We need to make a strong, long-term commitment to adult immunization as a nation if we are to realize the full benefits of the many vaccines available to us.”

While the NFID-sponsored survey found that most adults were very familiar with flu and chickenpox, both of which can be prevented by vaccines, it found that most adults were not very familiar with a host of other infectious diseases that can be prevented with vaccines. In addition to pneumococcal disease, these include shingles, hepatitis B, pertussis and HPV, which causes cervical cancer.

Although young adults were more likely than older adults to be very familiar with HPV and pneumococcal disease, they were much less likely than older adults to be aware of the threat from other vaccine-preventable diseases.

Physicians Have Most Influence Over Whether Adults Are Vaccinated

The survey found that personal physicians had the most influence on whether adults are aware of vaccine-preventable diseases and whether they keep up with their vaccinations, and that people who get annual physical exams are more likely to be vaccinated than those who don’t visit their doctor every year.

At the news conference, Stanley A. Gall, MD, professor of obstetrics, gynecology and women’s health at the University of Louisville, said that OB-GYN doctors could play an important role in making sure that the women they see are up-to-date with vaccinations. “Women may not only make better decisions about their own immunity based on input from an OB-GYN, but they may also bring immunization messages home to other family members,” he said.

Robert H. Hopkins, MD, associate professor at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, called for stepped-up attention to the fact that adults need to take a more active role in good preventive care, which includes getting vaccinated. “Mid-life is a time when people typically begin to face new health hazards, such as obesity and diabetes, and are therefore more vulnerable to the infectious diseases that vaccines can prevent. But even if middle-aged people are otherwise healthy, vaccines are an essential component of continued good health,” he said.

Cora L. Christian, MD, a member of AARP’s Board of Directors stressed the importance of vaccinating 50-plus Americans, particularly those who care for children and older loved ones. “The sandwich generation of Americans who may provide care for both their children and older parents are particularly vulnerable to infectious diseases,” Christian said. “It’s critical for caregivers and anyone 50-plus to get annual influenza vaccinations so they can avoid getting sick and prevent the spread of flu to their families. Just as important, people 65 and older should ask their doctor about a pneumococcal vaccine.”

The NHIS has monitored the health of the nation since 1957. NHIS 2008 data were collected through interviews with approximately 29,000 households.

The NFID survey, conducted by Opinion Research Corporation, was based on telephone interviews with 1,001 Americans aged 18 and older Feb. 19-22, 2009. The margin of error is plus or minus 3 percent.

About the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases

The National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID), a non-profit organization, has been a leading voice for education about infectious diseases and vaccination since 1973. It is dedicated to educating the public and healthcare professionals about the causes, treatment, and prevention of infectious diseases. For more information on vaccines and vaccine-preventable diseases, please visit www.nfid.org.

This news conference is sponsored by the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases and supported by unrestricted

educational grants from GlaxoSmithKline, Merck & Co., Inc., sanofi pasteur and Wyeth Pharmaceuticals.

Source: National Foundation for Infectious Diseases

Health Insurance Coverage Estimates by County

The U.S. Census Bureau today published 2006 estimates of health insurance coverage for each of the nation’s counties.

Small Area Health Insurance Estimates (SAHIE) are based on models combining data from a variety of sources, including the Annual Social and Economic Supplement of the Current Population Survey, Census 2000, the Census Bureau’s Population Estimates Program, the County Business Patterns data set and administrative records, such as aggregated federal tax returns and Medicaid participation records.

Although SAHIE currently is the only source for county-level estimates of health insurance coverage status, the Census Bureau in late September will release for the first time health insurance coverage estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS). These ACS single-year estimates will be available for all geographic areas with total populations of 65,000 or more, including all congressional districts. The health insurance question was added to the 2008 American Community Survey to permit the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to more accurately understand state and local health insurance needs.

SAHIE is used by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in support of its National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program. The program provides free cancer screenings to low-income, uninsured women.

“The health insurance estimates assist us in determining the level of need for breast and cervical cancer screening in communities nationwide,” said Marcus Plescia, director of the CDC’s Division of Cancer Prevention and Control in Atlanta. “The data permit us to plan our various programs and help us make decisions on how to allocate resources.”

Among numerous combinations of age, sex, income and (for states only) race and Hispanic origin, SAHIE includes data on low-income children. SAHIE offers an important snapshot as to the location and characteristics of those with and without health insurance. These data will help local planners make decisions concerning the number of uninsured in special populations. The data pertain only to those younger than 65.

Editor’s note: The report can be accessed at http://www.census.gov/did/nas/content/live/hispanic/sahie/.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

New Initiative to Improve Latino Mental Health in Chicago

The ChicagoSchool of Professional Psychology Receives Grant from The Chicago Community Trust to Build Latino Mental Health Providers Network

Latinos, who comprise 25 percent of Chicago’s population, are a high-risk group for depression, anxiety, and substance abuse, according to the National Alliance for Hispanic Mental Health (NAHMH), a reality made worse by a severe shortage of existing mental health care providers who are culturally competent. To help reverse this trend is the Latino Mental Health Providers Network, a new initiative made possible by a grant from The Chicago Community Trust to The Chicago School of Professional Psychology’s Center for Latino Mental Health.

The project comes at a critical time. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports a high rate of suicide attempts among Latino adolescents. Meanwhile, the Surgeon General reports that fewer than 1 in 11 Latinos with mental disorders contact mental health care specialists — a statistic that becomes 1 in 20 among Latino immigrants with mental disorders. To meet this challenge, experts estimate that there are approximately only 29 Latino mental health providers per 100,000 Latinos.

Building a pipeline for more culturally competent practitioners will be a central focus of the network. It will address a finding cited in a National Council of La Raza report that even when Latinos do access services, 70 percent never return after the first visit — a tendency attributed to the lack of competency training targeted to the cultural and linguistic needs of this population.

“Studies have shown that therapists who participate in cultural sensitivity training provide more effective treatment to ethnic minority populations,” said Dr. Hector Torres, Chicago School assistant professor and Center for Latino Mental Health coordinator. “The better the experience the Latino population has with mental health services, the more likely people in need will continue to benefit. Special thanks should go to The Chicago Community Trust for its support of this critical endeavor.”

The vision for the network is to become a growing and collaborative organization, strategically focused to build cultural competence through workshops and mentorship opportunities among its members, other healthcare professionals, and community agencies. It also will address the immediate need for culturally competent care by placing Chicago School clinical counseling interns and at least 75 student volunteers in agencies that serve the Latino community. Together they will deliver more than 8,000 service hours working with clients and staff. Finally, the network will engage in public awareness, research, and outreach to coordinate and strengthen efforts of grassroots agencies with limited staff and capacity to address critical needs.

The network is the latest project to be implemented by The Chicago School’s Center for Latino Mental Health. Founded in 2008, the center works to bolster understanding of and access to culturally competent mental health services to Latino communities through scholarly research, community service, and education. For more information about the center, visit www.thechicagoschool.edu/CLMH.

About The Chicago Community Trust:

For 94 years, The Chicago Community Trust, our region’s community foundation, has connected the generosity of donors with community needs by making grants to organizations working to improve metropolitan Chicago. In 2008, the Trust, together with its donors, granted more than $100 million to nonprofit organizations. From strengthening community schools to assisting local art programs, from building health centers to helping lives affected by violence, the Trust continues to enhance our region. To learn more, please visit the Trust online at www.cct.org.

About The Chicago School of Professional Psychology:

Founded in 1979, The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is the nation’s leading nonprofit graduate university exclusively dedicated to the applications of psychology and related behavioral sciences. TCS is an active member of the National Council of Schools and Programs of Professional Psychology, which has recognized The Chicago School for its distinguished service and outstanding contributions to cultural diversity and advocacy. The Chicago School’s community service initiatives resulted in recognition on the President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll for exemplary service to disadvantaged youth. For more information about The Chicago School, visit www.thechicagoschool.edu. Follow us on Twitter at www.twitter.com/GradPsychology. Follow us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/thechicagoschool.
Source: The Chicago School of Professional Psychology

Swine Flu Survival Kit Prepares Consumers for Flu Season

Consumer Reports shows how to avoid drugstore traps, and which remedies are most effective

As the U.S. prepares for a possible second wave of H1N1 or swine flu, as well as for the annual scourge of seasonal flu and colds, a new report from Consumer Reports helps households prepare for, prevent, and treat cold and flu symptoms safely and effectively, including recommendations for what to pack in an emergency kit for a flu outbreak. The report is available in the September 2009 issue of Consumer Reports and online at http://www.ConsumerReportsHealth.org/.

How to Prepare a Swine Flu Survival Kit

In case the second wave of swine flu is severe enough to warrant home confinement, consumers should pack an emergency kit in advance. You will need:

  • A two-week supply of food and water.
  • Fever reducers, such as acetaminophen, ibuprofen, or naproxen.
  • Cough and cold medications containing chlorpheniramine, diphenhydramine, oxymetazoline, and pseudoephedrine and lozenges with dyclonine, glycerin, or honey can help ease symptoms.
  • Electrolyte drinks, such as Gatorade or Powerade, to keep you hydrated.
  • Hand sanitizer with at least 60 percent alcohol, such as Purell, to kill viruses when soap and water aren’t available.
  • Surgical masks with an FDA rating of at least N-95 to help prevent spreading the flu. Masks need to be replaced often and disposed of after use.

For all emergencies, Consumer Reports recommends packing at least three days worth of nonperishable food; at least one gallon of water per person, per day; a first-aid kit that includes any prescription or over-the-counter medications your family might need; as well as antihistamines for allergic reactions, pain relievers, stomach and antidiarrhea remedies, and antacids.

The government is currently preparing a vaccine against the swine flu that will likely be recommended for school-age children and other high-risk individuals, such as pregnant women, those with chronic illness, and those who live or work with infants, preschoolers, or older adults. In the meantime, Consumer Reports recommends that everyone – but especially high-risk people – get vaccinated against regular, seasonal flu before December when that infection usually arrives.

“This could be an especially big year for flu, so people need to take every precaution and double their efforts to safeguard their families,” says Joel Keehn, senior editor, Consumer Reports. Even when the vaccine doesn’t prevent seasonal flu, it often lessens its symptoms. In terms of treatments, certain antiviral drugs can not only ease symptoms of seasonal flu but also shorten its duration and possibly prevent complications as well. Some of those drugs probably help against swine flu too. Antivirals work best if taken early on in the illness, so it’s best to take them at the first sign of symptoms.

Brands to Buy and Brands to Skip

Also in this issue, in a side by side comparison, Consumer Reports identifies the Consumer Reports Best Buy Drug choices to treat eight common conditions, including Attention Deficit/ Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), heartburn, and insomnia that can save consumers hundreds or even thousands of dollars a year. For example, consumers who need to lower their LDL (“bad”) cholesterol by less than 30 percent can save nearly $1,000 a year by taking lovastatin, a generic statin, instead of taking Lipitor, a more expensive brand-name drug. Launched in December 2004, Consumer Reports Best Buy Drugs is a public health initiative that rates more than 200 prescription drugs using comparative effectiveness research. Best Buy Drugs reports are available for free at www.ConsumerReportsHealth.org/BestBuyDrugs. By opting for Best Buy Drug choices, consumers can realize significant monthly savings while receiving the most effective and safest treatments for their condition.

As the new school year approaches and weed pollen allergen levels peak, Consumer Reports also lists other useful information for treating colds and allergies without medication. For colds, the best remedies are the simplest and can often be found in your kitchen, not a drugstore. For example, you can soothe a sore throat with a saltwater gargle, or try honey or non-medicated lozenges for a cough. Controlling allergies starts by limiting exposure to the triggers, keeping windows shut when outdoor triggers are high, and using an air conditioner or a dehumidifier to reduce humidity. To treat allergy symptoms with over-the-counter drugs, Consumer Reports recommends using generic versions of Claritin and Zyrtec – loratadine or cetirizine.

Avoiding Hidden Drugstore Traps

No matter your ailment, consumers need to watch out for the following traps at the drugstore when shopping for remedies:

  • Brand-name extensions. Drug manufacturers often use brand names to launch related but different products. There are 34 Vicks products and 14 Sudafed products, and countless store brands and generic versions. With so many products to choose from, people might take medications that are inappropriate or even risky.
  • Recommendation: Choose remedies by active ingredients, not the brand.
  • “Shotgun” remedies. Many products are loaded with multiple ingredients to blast several symptoms at once. That’s a misfire, since some added ingredients can increase risks, and any ingredient that treats a symptom you don’t have is unnecessary. Such products can increase the risk of overdoses if you take multiple medications.
  • Recommendation: Opt for medicines with just one active ingredient.
  • Prescription drugs that became over the counter (OTC). Direct access to medication can introduce new risks if people turn to them when simpler remedies would suffice or if they treat problems without a doctor’s diagnosis.
  • Recommendation: Before trying a drug that has become available over the counter, talk with your doctor to make sure that it’s right for you, that you need it, and that the condition doesn’t require medical supervision.

SEPTEMBER 2009

The material above is intended for legitimate news entities only; it may not be used for commercial or promotional purposes. Consumer Reports(R) is published by Consumers Union, an expert, independent nonprofit organization whose mission is to work for a fair, just, and safe marketplace for all consumers and to empower consumers to protect themselves. To achieve this mission, we test, inform, and protect. To maintain our independence and impartiality, Consumers Union accepts no outside advertising, no free test samples, and has no agenda other than the interests of consumers. Consumers Union supports itself through the sale of our information products and services, individual contributions, and a few noncommercial grants.

Source: Consumer Reports

Effort to Improve Diabetes Self Management and Care

Community-based Approach Aims to Improve Diabetes Self Management and Care

AADE, Emory University and Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Institute Partner to Educate and Improve Access to Care for Atlanta-area Minorities with Diabetes

The American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) today announced the launch of an Atlanta-based program aimed at improving self-management of diabetes among minority populations. In partnership with Emory University’s Latino Diabetes Education Program and the Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Institute, the program aims to advance diabetes education in Hispanic and African American populations and to improve clinical and behavioral outcomes. The announcement was made at the Association’s annual meeting.

The program will be offered in the Chamblee neighborhood, which is served by the North DeKalb Health Clinic. The clinic is part of the satellite neighborhood network of clinics of Grady Health System in the Metro Atlanta area. Emory’s Latino Diabetes Education Program is already serving the Latino community in this area, and will partner with Grady and AADE to implement this minority-specific model.

The “Increasing Access to Diabetes Self-Management Education as a Means of Decreasing Health Disparities in Minority Populations” project aims to:

  • Ensure high quality and culturally appropriate services for people with diabetes by involving different members of the disease management team including: physicians, educators, health promoters/community health workers and other health care professionals.
  • Teach the basics of diabetes self management to populations often lacking in education and community-focused support.
  • Build upon local program capacity to achieve desired clinical and behavioral outcomes.

Individuals from minority communities that participate in this program will receive support and tools that will empower them to:

  • Improve their health and clinical outcomes.
  • Change behaviors, set goals and gain problem solving and healthy coping skills.
  • Learn how to navigate the health care system to increase adherence to evidence-based guidelines and reduce high-cost emergency department utilization.

“This program is unique in that it promotes a team approach to diabetes care. Each member of the team — physician, diabetes educator and community health worker — supports and builds upon one another’s work,” said AADE President Marcia Draheim, RN, CDE. “Success will be measured by many factors including clinical improvements, behavioral outcomes, participation and patient satisfaction with the program.”

Emory University School of Medicine and Grady Health System have been serving Latinos with diabetes through the Emory Latino Diabetes Education Program. “The program started over three years ago and has reached more than 750 Latinos with diabetes and their families,” said Amparo Gonzalez, RN, CDE, director of the program. “This grant offers the opportunity to apply the successes and experiences that the Emory Latino Diabetes Education has had had with Latino community to the African American community.”

The program is sponsored through a grant from the Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Institute.

Facts about Diabetes in Minority Populations

Diabetes disproportionately affects minority individuals, who comprise a significant segment of the U.S. population. For example, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, Latinos represent the United States’ largest minority group making up 14.8% of the population or 43 million people.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

  • Non-Hispanic whites: 14.9 million, or 9.8% of all non-Hispanic whites aged 20 years or older, have diabetes.
  • Non-Hispanic blacks: 3.7 million, or 14.7% of all non-Hispanic blacks aged 20 years or older, have diabetes.

Moreover, health disparities are increasing in the U.S. Individuals in African American and Hispanic neighborhoods, in particular, face many barriers to achieving successful self-management of their diabetes. These barriers are attributable to structural factors (e.g., lack of sidewalks or access to food stores with affordable produce) as well as the cultural, socio-economic, and literacy characteristics of the people living there.

About the AADE

Founded in 1973, AADE was created by and for diabetes educators. We are dedicated to providing our members with the tools, training and support necessary to help patients change their behavior and accomplish their diabetes self-management goals.

As a multidisciplinary professional association, AADE represents and supports the diabetes educator by providing members the resources to stay abreast of the current research, methods and trends in the field and by offering opportunities to network and collaborate with other healthcare professionals. AADE is continuously working towards our vision of successful self-management for all people with diabetes and related conditions.

About the Emory Latino Diabetes Education Program

The Emory Latino Diabetes Education Program is a non-profit program aimed to provide diabetes education and lifestyle intervention to Latinos in Georgia. The program began in December 2005 and was accredited by the American Association of Diabetes Educators in 2008. It is the first nationally accredited all-Spanish diabetes education program.

About the Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Institute

The Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Institute is a global initiative that provides health care professionals with access to the latest information and skills training to deliver quality care at the community level, and do so in a care model that facilitates early glucose control and appropriate follow-up. Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Institute aims to be a catalyst for diabetes innovation, improved care and better outcomes worldwide through educational programs.

Source: The American Association of Diabetes Educators

Prescription Assistance Partnership Prepared to Help NJ Workers

The ‘Help Is Here Express’ bus tour will be stopping in New Jersey throughout the week of August 9-15 at various cities in order to help uninsured and financially-struggling New Jersey residents access information on programs that provide prescription medicines for free or nearly free. With the state’s unemployment rate now hitting 8.8 percent — compared to 5.1% a year ago — the Partnership for Prescription Assistance (PPA) bus tour is raising awareness of patient assistance programs among state residents who face layoffs and loss of health care benefits.

The PPA, a nationwide effort sponsored by America’s pharmaceutical research companies, provides a single point of access to more than 475 patient assistance programs that help those who are uninsured or struggling financially. Nearly 200 of the programs are provided by pharmaceutical companies.

The “Help Is Here Express” bus will be at the following New Jersey locations:

Sunday, August 9, 2009

WHEN: 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.

WHERE: Crawford Rodriguez Elementary School

1025 Larsen Road

Jackson, NJ 08527

Monday, August 10, 2009

WHEN: 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

WHERE: NJ STEPS

14 South Clifton Avenue

Lakewood, NJ 08701

Tuesday, August 11, 2009

WHEN: 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

WHERE: Neighborhood Health Center

1700 Myrtle Avenue

Plainfield, NJ 07063

Wednesday, August 12, 2009

WHEN: 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

WHERE: Neighborhood Health Center

250 Second Street

Elizabeth, NJ 07206

Saturday, August 15, 2009

WHEN: 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

WHERE: Shappell Park

427-429 South Main Street

Phillipsburg, NJ

“The PPA, so far, has helped well over 239,000 New Jersey residents find out if they may qualify for free or discounted medicines and as we move forward into 2009, the assistance is still available,” said PhRMA President and CEO Billy Tauzin. “That’s good news for the citizens of New Jersey, where there are more than 400,000 people out of work.”

Patients who qualify for help from the PPA’s participating patient assistance programs have access to more than 2,500 brand-name and generic prescription medicines. In addition, the PPA provides information on more than 10,000 free health care clinics in America and has connected more than 281,600 patients with clinics and health care providers in their communities.

Patients seeking help from PPA can call a toll-free number (1-888-4-PPA-NOW) to talk to a trained operator or access the PPA Web site (www.pparx.org). It only takes 10 to 15 minutes to find out if someone may qualify for free or discounted medications.

To help spread the word about the assistance available, the PPA’s “Help Is Here Express” buses continue to visit communities all over the country with trained specialists on board to provide information on how to access patient assistance programs. All 50 states and more than 2,500 towns and cities have been visited so far, and nearly 6 million patients have been helped nationwide since the PPA began in April 2005.

“At a time when national unemployment is the highest in almost two decades, the PPA has become an important lifeline for a growing number of patients,” PhRMA’s Tauzin said. “Millions of Americans have been added to the jobless rolls over the last several months and there could be a sharp increase in the number of our citizens losing health care benefits.”

“PPA is currently helping thousands of people every day,” Tauzin added, including those who need treatments to fight such debilitating chronic diseases as cancer, heart disease, diabetes and asthma.

On a national level, the Partnership for Prescription Assistance is represented by Emmy-winning syndicated television talk show host Montel Williams, named PPA’s national spokesman in January 2006. In addition, nationally recognized Telemundo talk show host and author Mayte Prida leads the PPA’s Hispanic outreach effort.

“Since January 2006, I’ve been traveling the country talking about the Partnership for Prescription Assistance, urging people to pick up the phone, log on to the Web site or visit the big, orange PPA bus to see if they may qualify for assistance,” said Williams. “As a patient who must cope every day with the effects of multiple sclerosis, I understand only too well the importance of having access to the medicine you need.”

More than 1,300 national, state and local partners are working with America’s pharmaceutical research companies to spread the word about the program. Trained specialists work with doctors, pharmacists, health care providers and community groups, educating them on the process and use of the PPA’s easy-to-access Web site and toll-free number.

To find out if there are patient assistance programs that may meet their needs, patients should call toll-free 1-888-4PPA-NOW (1-888-477-2669) to speak with a trained specialist or visit www.pparx.org.

Source: Partnership for Prescription Assistance

Health advertising campaigns by Kaiser Permanente

Kaiser Permanente Continues to Spread Health With New Health Advertising Campaigns

Thrivecampaign reflects diverse communities; focuses on health advocacy and quality

Kaiser Permanente is adding two new television commercials to its Thrive advertising campaign this month. The 30-second ads, titled “Mural” and “Kabuki,” reinforce Kaiser Permanente’s commitment to the communities it serves, as well as the organization’s dedication to helping its members achieve total health.

Mural, the first of the health advertising campaigns

“Mural,” a bilingual commercial featuring Latin music, tells a story of young artists in an urban neighborhood who start with a polluted environment, and create a beautiful mural of a park with a farmers market and a soccer field, demonstrating how healthy environments play an instrumental role in total health and wellness. Using a technique that water-washes a stencil pattern onto a dirty wall, the patterned scene comes to life as the spot closes with the words, “Imagine Health. Kaiser Permanente. Viva Bien.”

Kabuki, the second of the health advertising campaigns

“Kabuki,” a musical-themed ad, showcases an actual Kaiser Permanente health team and employs techniques derived from the ancient art form of Kabuki, a type of Japanese dance-drama. The “Kabuki” spot includes two Southern California doctors, Bob Sallis, MD, and Tad Funahashi, MD, along with Daniella Gerber, education and research clerk, Jim Warmington, pharmacy services manager, Lynn Owens, RN, and Norma Aguilar, medical assistant. The overarching Thrive message is, “You and your Kaiser Permanente team. Together, you rock.”

“‘Mural’ and ‘Kabuki’ continue to expand on Kaiser Permanente’s message of total health,” said Debbie Cantu, vice president of brand marketing and advertising for Kaiser Permanente. “With ‘Mural’ we showcase the importance of community partnerships to create healthier communities and with ‘Kabuki,’ we highlight the benefits of an integrated health care system, where all caregivers are connected with each other as well as with patients. We are proud to emphasize our commitment to healthier communities and comprehensive, coordinated care to promote a culture of wellness–Kaiser Permanente’s point of differentiation.”

The $50-million, multi-year Thrive Campaign was created in partnership with Warren, Michigan-based advertising agency Campbell-Ewald, which has worked with Kaiser Permanente since the rollout of the first Thrive ads in 2004, and its sister agency Accentmarketing, headquartered in Miami, which specializes in the Hispanic market.

“The most interesting aspect of the ‘Kabuki’ spot is the real Kaiser Permanente medical professionals who perform the Kabuki dance in the finale,” said Campbell-Ewald Agency Creative Director, Neville Anderson. “Just as in real life, you can count on every member of the Kaiser Permanente team to work in unison to provide completely integrated care for each patient.”

“Kabuki” will run in California, Oregon/Washington, Colorado (Southern),Hawaii and Georgia. “Mural” will be shown in California,Oregon/Washington and Colorado (Denver).

Source: Red Orbit

The Hispanic got milk? Campaign

The Hispanic got milk? Drink Well. Live Well. Tour Promotes the Milk Looks Good on You Sweepstakes During its Stop in Chicago

The Hispanic got milk? Campaign - la leche te queda bien

The Hispanic got milk? Campaign – la leche te queda bien

The Hispanic got milk? Milk Mustache Mobile Tour visited Chicago as part of its 75 city tour, including the top 10 Hispanic cities, to reintroduce Hispanics to this nutrient powerhouse and its array of benefits. The tour recently cruised through Chicago hosting free events to encourage local residents to not only live well, but to drink well with nature’s wellness drink: milk.

Learning with Milk... Blanca Jara learns the importance of incorporating milk into her daily diet at the got milk? Drink Well. Live Well. tour event in the Thompson Center. This initiative reinforces that milk, at about 25 cents a glass, provides you with 9 essential nutrients like calcium and Vitamin D -- plus it is one of the most economical sources of protein.

Learning with Milk… Blanca Jara learns the importance of incorporating milk into her daily diet at the got milk? Drink Well. Live Well. tour event in the Thompson Center. This initiative reinforces that milk, at about 25 cents a glass, provides you with 9 essential nutrients like calcium and Vitamin D — plus it is one of the most economical sources of protein.

At the events, Hispanic mothers were given the opportunity to enter the Milk Looks Good on You sweepstakes and win an original dress by Carolina Herrera, a free paid vacation for two to New York City for 3 nights and $500 for expenses.

Check us out at http://www.eligeleche.com to learn more about the Drink Well. Live Well. campaign and the Milk Looks Good on You sweepstakes.

 

The Hispanic got milk? Campaign - New faces of Wellness... The Ugarte sisters rock milk mustaches after tasting delicious milk from local processors. Older sister, Katherine, sets the example for her younger sister, Stephanie, to drink 3 glasses of low fat or fat free milk a day, as it helps build strong bones and achieve overall wellness.

The Hispanic got milk? Campaign – New faces of Wellness… The Ugarte sisters rock milk mustaches after tasting delicious milk from local processors. Older sister, Katherine, sets the example for her younger sister, Stephanie, to drink 3 glasses of low fat or fat free milk a day, as it helps build strong bones and achieve overall wellness.

The Milk Processor Education Program (MilkPEP), Washington, D.C., is funded by the nation’s milk processors, who are committed to increasing fluid milk consumption. The MilkPEP Board runs the national Milk Mustache “got milk?” Campaign, a multi-faceted campaign designed to educate consumers about the health benefits of milk. For more information, go to http://www.whymilk.com. The tagline “got milk?”(R) was created for the California Milk Processor Board by Goodby Silverstein & Partners and is licensed by the national milk processor and dairy producer groups.
Source: HispanicPR Wire