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First Hispanic Website for New Moms on Natural Family Care

New Site to Serve Community of Latina Mothers across the U.S. and First Hispanic Website for New Moms on Natural Family Care

Hyland’s, Inc., a leading provider of natural over-the-counter medicines, announced today that it has launched ComienzosSaludables.com (Comienzos Saludables), a unique social networking, education-based website for Latina mothers. Comienzos Saludables continues Hyland’s strategy to improve the availability of, and accessibility to, important healthcare resources for this growing population. The new site offers Hispanic mothers a fully bilingual Spanish/English community to assist with information on pregnancy, infant care, raising a family, healthy lifestyle, and treating your family’s health issues with natural medicines.

Hispanic Website for New Moms: New Site to Serve Community of Latina Mothers across the U.S.

Hispanic Website for New Moms: New Site to Serve Community of Latina Mothers across the U.S.

Comienzo Saludables marks Hyland’s latest initiative to reach out to the Hispanic consumer. Already, the company has made packaging on 22 products Spanish/English bilingual, developed a baby development calendar in Spanish and sponsored a community health worker, Promotoras, program called Salud con Hyland’s. Now, with usage of social networking sites by Hispanics up 200% in 2006 (Forrester’s Hispanic Technographics Series Research), Hyland’s delivers this new resource for Latina mothers.

“Hyland’s has a longstanding commitment to providing accessible healthcare,” said J.P. Borneman, PhD, chairman and CEO of Hyland’s, Inc. “With 25% of U.S. moms of Hispanic origin, that access, in this case, comes in the form of a website full of culturally relevant, in-language educational material for Hispanic families. Our goal is to empower pre- and post-natal Hispanic mothers with information and a community of support as they strive to give their babies the very healthiest start in life.”

Studies show that a growing number of Hispanics are online and seeking information in their own language. Specifically, according to eMarketer, 23 million U.S. Hispanics were online in 2008 and that number is expected to surpass 29 million by 2012. Also, according to AOL/Roper Public Affairs Hispanic Cyberstudy 2005, Spanish language content is important to 75% of Hispanic web users.

Comienzos Saludables brings health information and social media, in a fully bilingual format, together to address this growing demographic. With 70% of Latina mothers under the age of 30, and with an increasing number of Hispanics shown to have a natural affinity for online social networking, Hyland’s expects tremendous response from Latina mothers to its new site. Free membership to Comienzos Saludables, or Healthy Beginnings, provides access to interactive community tools, including community forums, photo galleries, blogs, personal profile pages, over 400 articles on family health and lifestyle topics, and monthly newsletters. The site is divided into the following sections: Healthy Pregnancy; Your Baby; Parent’s Corner; Home Remedies and Homeopathy; Healthy and Natural Lifestyle; and Community.

Comienzos Saludables features the latest in web 2.0 technologies and provides a secure, friendly online environment for Latinas to stay in touch with their friends and family, as well as make new connections by sharing tips, advice and experiences of motherhood with others.

When it comes to a kid's television-viewing habits, the mom's language can matter.
New Site to Serve Community of Latina Mothers across the U.S.
Kids with Cancer
Hispanic Children In U.S. At Greater Risk For Obesity Than Other Ethnic/Racial Groups

Visit www.comienzossaludables.com or www.hylandshealthybeginnings.com to join the new online community.

Source: Yahoo

First Hispanic Website for New Moms on Natural Family Care

New Site to Serve Community of Latina Mothers across the U.S. and First Hispanic Website for New Moms on Natural Family Care

Hyland’s, Inc., a leading provider of natural over-the-counter medicines, announced today that it has launched ComienzosSaludables.com (Comienzos Saludables), a unique social networking, education-based website for Latina mothers. Comienzos Saludables continues Hyland’s strategy to improve the availability of, and accessibility to, important healthcare resources for this growing population. The new site offers Hispanic mothers a fully bilingual Spanish/English community to assist with information on pregnancy, infant care, raising a family, healthy lifestyle, and treating your family’s health issues with natural medicines.

Hispanic Website for New Moms: New Site to Serve Community of Latina Mothers across the U.S.

Hispanic Website for New Moms: New Site to Serve Community of Latina Mothers across the U.S.

Comienzo Saludables marks Hyland’s latest initiative to reach out to the Hispanic consumer. Already, the company has made packaging on 22 products Spanish/English bilingual, developed a baby development calendar in Spanish and sponsored a community health worker, Promotoras, program called Salud con Hyland’s. Now, with usage of social networking sites by Hispanics up 200% in 2006 (Forrester’s Hispanic Technographics Series Research), Hyland’s delivers this new resource for Latina mothers.

“Hyland’s has a longstanding commitment to providing accessible healthcare,” said J.P. Borneman, PhD, chairman and CEO of Hyland’s, Inc. “With 25% of U.S. moms of Hispanic origin, that access, in this case, comes in the form of a website full of culturally relevant, in-language educational material for Hispanic families. Our goal is to empower pre- and post-natal Hispanic mothers with information and a community of support as they strive to give their babies the very healthiest start in life.”

Studies show that a growing number of Hispanics are online and seeking information in their own language. Specifically, according to eMarketer, 23 million U.S. Hispanics were online in 2008 and that number is expected to surpass 29 million by 2012. Also, according to AOL/Roper Public Affairs Hispanic Cyberstudy 2005, Spanish language content is important to 75% of Hispanic web users.

Comienzos Saludables brings health information and social media, in a fully bilingual format, together to address this growing demographic. With 70% of Latina mothers under the age of 30, and with an increasing number of Hispanics shown to have a natural affinity for online social networking, Hyland’s expects tremendous response from Latina mothers to its new site. Free membership to Comienzos Saludables, or Healthy Beginnings, provides access to interactive community tools, including community forums, photo galleries, blogs, personal profile pages, over 400 articles on family health and lifestyle topics, and monthly newsletters. The site is divided into the following sections: Healthy Pregnancy; Your Baby; Parent’s Corner; Home Remedies and Homeopathy; Healthy and Natural Lifestyle; and Community.

Comienzos Saludables features the latest in web 2.0 technologies and provides a secure, friendly online environment for Latinas to stay in touch with their friends and family, as well as make new connections by sharing tips, advice and experiences of motherhood with others.

When it comes to a kid's television-viewing habits, the mom's language can matter.
New Site to Serve Community of Latina Mothers across the U.S.
Kids with Cancer
Hispanic Children In U.S. At Greater Risk For Obesity Than Other Ethnic/Racial Groups

Visit www.comienzossaludables.com or www.hylandshealthybeginnings.com to join the new online community.

Source: Yahoo

Hispanics and bypass surgery

According to a study published on the June 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology and performed by Dr. Luis R. Castellanos, Dr. Sharon-Lise T. Normand, and Dr.  John Z. Ayanian, Hispanics undergoing bypass surgery (isolated CABG or Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting) in Massachusetts were more likely to be operated on by cardiac surgeons with higher risk-standardized mortality rates than by surgeons with lower rates.

Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Access to Heart Care - Hispanics have increased chances of lower quality bypass surgery

Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Access to Heart Care – Hispanics have increased chances of lower quality bypass surgery

For the purpose of this study, participating surgeons were divided into four groups based on their risk-standardized 30-day all-cause mortality incidence rates.

The results:

  • White patients were more likely to be treated by surgeons with lower mortality rates than with lower mortality rates.
  • Hispanic patients were almost 3 times more likely to be treated by surgeons with higher mortality incidence rates.
  • Compared with whites, Hispanic patients were about half as less likely to be treated by surgeons with lower mortality incidence rates.
  • African-American and white patients shared the same probabilities of being treated by higher and lower mortality incidence rate doctors.

In conclusion, Hispanics undergoing isolated CABG in Massachusetts were more likely to be operated on by cardiac surgeons with higher risk-standardized mortality rates than by surgeons with lower rates.

Dr. Castellanos was funded by the Commonwealth Fund/Harvard University Fellowship in Minority Health Policy, Boston, Massachusetts, and data collection and analysis for this study were supported by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.
Source: The American Journal of Cardiology

Focusing on Hispanic Eyecare

Focusing on Hispanic Eye Care

ST. LOUIS, June 24 /PRNewswire/ — If you are having difficulties with your eyesight or need a complete eye exam, which eyecare professional should you visit? The answer may not be as crystal clear as it seems because there are various types of eye care professionals, such as opticians, optometrists and ophthalmologists, and all of them play an important role in contributing to proper eyecare.

The American Optometric Association (AOA) and its members are committed to improving the quality and availability of eye and vision care for all Americans. However, we have noticed that Hispanic patients sometimes shy away from visiting an optometrist because of previous knowledge derived from a cultural background that defines the role of the optometrist differently in the United States than how is defined in many countries in Latin America.

In order to simplify the task of finding proper eye care in the blink of an eye, let us take a quick look at the three O’s of eye care: Optometrist, Ophthalmologist and Optician.

The Optometrist is an eye care doctor who examines, diagnoses, treats and manages diseases and eye disorders. This professional has gone through four years of college, an additional four years of study at a college of optometry, and in many cases, one more year in a residency program. A doctor of optometry will tell you if you need glasses and will look further to determine if you suffer an eye condition or eye disease. This professional can also prescribe medication. Optometrists are the largest eye care profession and provide two- thirds of all eye care services. In summary, an optometrist in the U.S. is a doctor in optometry who diagnoses and treats eye diseases and conditions, including prescriptions of eyewear and of the appropriate drugs.

If your children need to get an eye exam before the opening of the school year, or if one morning you notice their eyes could have symptoms of pink eye, this is the eyecare professional to see.

The Ophthalmologist, on the other hand, is the professional to visit if you have cataracts that may require surgery, as this eye care provider is a medical doctor licensed to practice medicine and perform eye surgery. The optometrist often diagnoses the cataracts and refers the patient to the ophthalmologist for further care.

The Optician also has a role in your eyecare, because in conjunction with an Optometrist or an Ophthalmologist, this eye care professional is licensed to dispense eyewear for patients. They will be able to tell you which frames and types of lenses best suit the prescription of your optometrist, and help to make choices based on your particular needs and style.

The AOA and Transitions Optical, Inc. are partnering to actively reach out to Hispanic eyecare patients to provide them with educational materials developed in Spanish to suit their particular needs. To facilitate communications and improve access to eyecare, the AOA has developed www.aoa.org, where you can find valuable information under “Informacion acerca de sus ojos” including a narrative about visual development from childhood to adulthood; also visitwww.aprendasobreanteojos.com and www.yonosabiaeso.com, developed by Transitions to offer you and your family educational content for all ages.

Next time you need to choose an eyecare professional, remember the three O’s, ready to work together and provide you and your family with the best eyecare.

10.05% of Hispanic Americans consider themselves lactose intolerant
Breaking Through the Mammography Controversy
Health Disparities Pose High Cost for American Economy, Researchers Say
Kids with Cancer
Hispanic Children In U.S. At Greater Risk For Obesity Than Other Ethnic/Racial Groups

Source: Transitions Optical, Inc.; American Optometric Association – By Peter H. Kehoe, O.D., President, American Optometric Association

smile back

smile back

An Aloe Vera Juice Site for the Hispanic Market?

Aloe Vera is a Hispanic folk remedy that has found its way into other cultures and into many skin creams. It has a strong soothing effect when applied directly from cut leaves. A bit gooey at first but oh so refreshing.

Aloe Vera is used to treat cuts and burns on the skin, it is believed to have skin rejuvenation powers and when in liquid form, it helps boost the immune system.

I still remember the words of one american surgeon that advised me to drink Aloe Vera juice during the 10 days before a surgery. How’s that for culture penetration?

Now US Farms, Inc., announced the launch of its new Hispanic focused web site  http://www.jugodealoevera.com, which will operate as a division of US Farms Inc.

Aloe Vera Plant

US Farms Aloe Vera Juice retails for $14.95 per bottle or wholesales for $89.95 per case (12 bottles). US Farms Aloe Vera Juice can be ordered online with Visa, Master Card, Discover, or American Express or by calling their customer service.

US Farms Aloe Vera Juice is an exclusive proprietary formulation which includes: Aloe Vera Juice (Barbadensis Miller), White Grape, Cranberry, Concord Grape and Black Cherry juice concentrate which are potent anti-oxidants and phyto-nutrients.

If you are interested in sampling their new and exciting Aloe Vera Juice will be offered for a limited time, a free 32 oz. bottle of US Farms Aloe Vera juice. Visit their website at http://jugodealoevera.com/sample.html

About US Farms Aloe Vera Juice

What sets US Farms Aloe Vera Juice apart from others is our farm fresh crop. Our Aloe Vera is hand harvested and cultivated using the best farming practices to ensure the highest quality. We blend our high-grade Aloe Vera with just the right amount of all-natural fruit juices to give it a great taste.

Aloe Vera has been known for centuries and used by people thought out the world. Aloe Barbadensis Miller (leaf inner gel) contains a wide variety of nutrients, including vitamins, minerals, and amino acids. These nutrients, along with the phyto-nutrients in the fruit juices, as well as the anti-oxidants they contain, they say makes their Aloe Vera juice the perfect complement to an active lifestyle.

We know all of us can enjoy the rewards of adding Aloe Vera Juice to our diets. Will we?

Source: US Farms, Inc.

Clear your mind here

Clear your mind here

Spanish speaking robot tells you how to take your meds!

Robot Speaks Many Languages – Improves Pharmacy Patient Outcomes

MISSION, Kan., June 8 /PRNewswire/ — Language is sometimes a barrier for patients when it comes to understanding instructions for taking medications. A prescription label language barrier increases the risk that a patient will use medication improperly and fail to obtain the benefit or suffer an adverse drug event.

Pills in Spanish! - Spanish speaking robot tells you how to take your meds!

Pills in Spanish! – Spanish speaking robot tells you how to take your meds!

ScriptPro robotic prescription dispensing systems incorporate technologies that translate medication instructions and drug auxiliary warnings, and print them on prescription labels in the preferred language of the patient. Languages covered include Spanish, French, Chinese, Arabic, Thai and Maori, in addition to English.

Navarro Discount Pharmacies, Miami, FL, prints approximately 75% of their prescriptions in Spanish. The focus of the largest Hispanic owned chain in North America is to meet the needs of and provide customer service to the Hispanic community in and around Miami, according to Albert Garcia, Executive Vice President of Pharmacy for Navarro.

Garcia says that understanding the prescription information is vital to having a successful course of drug therapy, especially when the patient is ill or nervous about receiving directions from the prescribing physician. He adds, “Having the Sig and auxiliary label in Spanish increases compliance and reduces the chance of over/under utilization of the medication or performing an activity that might be detrimental to the patient’s health.”

Peter Koo, R.Ph. and owner of Starside Pharmacies, built his five pharmacies to focus on the Sino-American communities in the New York City area. ScriptPro robotic and workflow systems allow his pharmacies to print prescription labels in Mandarin Chinese for his customers. According to Koo, “There are many opportunities for pharmacies to provide distinctive and valuable services to patient populations that might otherwise be challenged by language barriers.” He also hires employees with strong linguistic skills.

10.05% of Hispanic Americans consider themselves lactose intolerant
Breaking Through the Mammography Controversy
Health Disparities Pose High Cost for American Economy, Researchers Say
Kids with Cancer
Hispanic Children In U.S. At Greater Risk For Obesity Than Other Ethnic/Racial Groups

Source: PRNewswire – ScriptPro

good things take time #lifequotes

good things take time

Hispanic children are getting most nutrients, but eating too much fat

The Hispanic community has its own set of health challenges, including high rates of diabetes, plus kidney and cardiovascular disease. Children aren’t immune — according to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, from 2005 through 2006 Mexican American children age 2 through 19 were the heaviest among all ethnic and racial groups in the U.S.

Los Angeles Times – Hispanic Children – Health

Just how their diets break down is the subject of a study in the June issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Assn., which analyzed the nutrition quality in diets of 1,030 normal weight and overweight Hispanic children age 4 to 19 in Houston who had low socioeconomic status. Quality was assessed using the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, published jointly by the Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Agriculture.

Overall, the diets of all children were adequate in most nutrients, but often surpassed the guidelines for total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, and added sugar and salt. Looking more closely at the foods the kids ate, 68% of calories came primarily from soda, desserts, pizza, chips, fruit drinks, fruit juice, processed meats and burgers. About one-fourth of the children went over the maximum intake level of 25% for added sugars.

All kids came up short on fruits and vegetables — the average number of servings they ate was lower than the Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommendation. They also fell below standards on consumption of vitamins E and D, pantothenic acid, calcium, potassium and fiber.

Several factors put the Hispanic population at higher risk for obesity. In this study, 91% of parents were overweight or obese, and parents’ income and education levels were low. Other issues reported in the NHANES study include limited health insurance coverage, acculturation to American diet and lifestyle, recent immigration, and access to medical care.

Researchers from the Baylor College of Medicine wrote in this study: “Knowledge of the dietary intake of children from low-[socioeconomic status] Hispanic families at high risk for obesity will provide a basis on which to build nutritional interventions and policy that are appropriately tailored to population subgroups.”

 

Love this quote. Move on!

Love this quote. Move on!

Source: Los Angeles Times – Health
By Jeannine Stein
Photo credit: Francis Specker / AP

School taking steps to fight swine flu

Associated Press

10:40 AM CDT, April 27, 2009

CHICAGO – Concern about a deadly strain of swine flu has prompted one Chicago school in a largely Hispanic neighborhood to forbid students from shaking hands.

Orozco Community Academy Principal Coralia Barraza also says when parents call to say their children are home sick, school officials are being told to ask more questions about the illness than they typically do.

Barraza says the school in Chicago’s Pilsen neighborhood is being particularly vigilant because it has a lot of Hispanic children and routinely enrolls students who’ve just arrived from Mexico — including one just last week.
She also says students travel with their families to and from Mexico.