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Strategic Alliance Between Televisa and Genomma Lab

Grupo Televisa, S.A.B. (“Televisa”; NYSE: TV; BMV: TLEVISA CPO) and Genomma Lab Internacional, S.A.B. de C.V. (“Genomma Lab”; BMV: LAB B) announced today that they have signed a strategic alliance agreement to sell and distribute personal care and over the counter pharmaceuticals in the United States and Puerto Rico.

The strategic alliance will operate through Televisa Consumer Products USA (“TCP”) a company owned 51% by Televisa and 49% by Genomma Lab. The sale and distribution of Genomma Lab’s products will be an integral part of the activities of TCP.

As part of this alliance, TCP will enter into, among others, a product supply agreement with Genomma Lab. Televisa will make available its different media platforms in the United States and Puerto Rico to TCP, which will provide Genomma Lab’s brands with significant advertising in the targeted markets in line with Genomma Lab’s business model.

This will enable Genomma Lab to expand the extensive success of its brands beyond Mexico and Latin America by accessing a Hispanic market of approximately 50 million consumers with a purchasing power of over $870 billion annually while leveraging off of Televisa’s reach and name recognition in the Hispanic market.

Subject to certain conditions, the parties contemplate closing the transaction in the following months and launching operations by year end.

About Grupo Televisa, S.A.B

Grupo Televisa, S.A.B., is the largest media company in the Spanish-speaking world and a major participant in the international entertainment business. It has interests in television production and broadcasting, production of pay-television networks, international distribution of television programming, direct to home satellite services, cable television and telecommunication services, magazine publishing and publishing distribution, radio production and broadcasting, professional sports and live entertainment, feature-film production and distribution, the operation of an internet portal, and gaming. Grupo Televisa also owns an unconsolidated equity stake in La Sexta, a free-to-air television venture in Spain.

 

About Genomma Lab Internacional, S.A.B. de C.V.

Genomma Lab Internacional, S.A.B. de C.V. is one of the fastest growing pharmaceutical and personal care products companies in Mexico and has an increasing presence in the international markets. Genomma Lab develops, sells and markets a broad range of premium branded products, many of which are leaders in the categories in which they compete in terms of sales and market share. The Company has significantly grown its revenue and profitability through a combination of a successful new product development process, consumer-oriented marketing, a broad retail distribution network and a low-cost, highly flexible operating model.

Source: Genomma Lab Internacional, S.A.B. de C.V.

People still prefer real-life recommendations to online

Word of Mouth and Viral Marketing

Word of Mouth and Viral Marketing: real-life recommendations preferred?

Word of Mouth and Viral Marketing: real-life recommendations preferred?

Referring a product or service is not a new idea, it’s been around as long as people have—but is the way people make recommendations changing with the times? Despite increased online activity, new research from Mintel shows real-life recommendations are still more influential to consumers than those received online.
Mintel’s exclusive consumer survey showed most people who bought a product or service based off a recommendation did so on a referral from a friend/relative or husband/wife/partner (34% and 25%, respectively). Only 5% of respondents bought based on the recommendation of a blogger, the same for a chat room.

“It’s interesting to find that as much time as we spend online, we still prefer a personal recommendation from someone we know and trust,” states Chris Haack, senior analyst at Mintel. “Young adults are somewhat more likely to turn to the Internet for advice and referrals, but even they listen to their peers first.”

Most people base a recommendation on price and convenience, according to Mintel. Especially in the current economic climate, where shoppers are compelled to find the lowest price, it’s not surprising that more than 64% of respondents state that price drove them to recommend a product or service, while quality (55%) and convenience (33%) follow behind.

Mintel reports that Asian and Hispanic respondents are considerably more likely to recommend a product they saw advertised. Asians (14%) and Hispanics (10%) are also more likely to report being influenced by bloggers to purchase a specific product or service.

“The sheer number of people that purchase based on recommendations proves marketers need to pay attention to word of mouth,” states Chris Haack. “It’s becoming easier for businesses to lose control of their marketing messages, so companies need to carefully monitor and respond to consumer conversations about their brands.”

Source: http://www.mintel.com

Burger King enters mobile commerce full-throttle

Fast-food giant Burger King has entered the mobile commerce arena by letting consumers place orders and pay for them their iPhone. Now that’s fast food.

Restaurant locator - Burger King enters mobile commerce full-throttle

Burger King enters mobile commerce full-throttle – Restaurant locator

Burger King Mobile Restaurant Locator

Burger King teamed up with Gomobo and PointAbout for the development and design of the application. The Burger King NOW location-aware iPhone application is currently being tested in the Queens, New York, area.

“The idea of the iPhone app is to go the full nine yards with a rich mobile ordering platform,” said Noah N. Glass, founder CEO of Gomobo, New York. “This is the first case study that we have done with an iPhone application and we expect to launch these types of applications for other quick-serve restaurants we are working with.”

Gomobo helps fast-food and restaurant chains mobilize their services via mobile Web sites, and now through iPhone apps as well. Clients include Subway and Dunkin’ Donuts.

Burger King, the nation’s No. 2 burger-and-fries chain after McDonald’s Corp., has been known for its innovation with new technology, including its highly viral Subservient Chicken online viral marketing campaign earlier in the decade. Ordering and paying through the iPhone application is part of that DNA.

The iPhone’s GPS functionality lets users skip the step of entering in an address into the app. Instead it automatically finds the Burger King location closest to them.

When users place their order and come in to pick it up, they can skip the line and just grab their food, since they have paid for it via the app.

The application also tracks and saves order history and then acts as a loyalty card by offering incentives and deals.

Customize your Burger King meal

Burger King enters mobile commerce full-throttle

Burger King enters mobile commerce full-throttle

The goal behind this application is to drive incremental same-store sales – a key metric for the restaurant industry, Mr. Glass said. He also said that orders placed via the application have been 25 percent larger than in-store.

When customers start using the service, they increase their frequency of visits by 42 percent and the mobile offering takes existing loyal customers and increases their value by 75 percent.

The application is helping Burger King drive additional sales, since new customers can discover the stores near them that they may have not known about previously.

In terms of security, the application is fully secure. So, customers don’t have to worry about their credit card information being misused.

Also, the information is stored within the application, so that it doesn’t need to be re-entered each time the customer places an order.

When picking up their food, customers just need to give the last four digits of their mobile number, to confirm they are in fact the person that placed the order.

PointAbout helped Gomobo develop the application. It took the guts of the Burger King mobile site, which was developed by Gomobo, and poured it all into an iPhone experience.

Also, PointAbout made it possible for the application to remember the phone ID and allowed it to pull GPS information.

“Traditionally QSRs have focused on the four walls concept, which means doing marketing within the four walls of the restaurant,” Mr. Glass said. “They focused on what could be done in-store to make sure that patrons come back

“The mobile device allows them to extend where transactions take place and let customers make transactions from anywhere, therefore extending those four walls to the consumer’s hands,” he said. “It is also a much more efficient way of taking an order and the payment.”
Source: Mobile Marketer

Mundet, the Wonderful Apple Soft Drink Centenario Promotion

Mundet announces the first winner of its national Centenario promotion — Julissa from Calexico, California. This contest commemorates the 100+- year heritage of Mundet, offering exciting prizes under special gold bottlecaps that can be found on Mundet Manzana Verde (Green Apple) and Sidral (Original Red Apple) Mundet bottles.

Mundet, the delicious apple-based soft drink which has been a part of the Mexican heritage since the early 20th century, is celebrating its 100+-year heritage with an exciting Centenario promotion. Consumers have the opportunity to win exciting instant-win prizes located under special gold bottlecaps found on Mundet Green Apple and Sidral Mundet glass bottles. The grand prizes are Centenarios, Mexican bullion coins created in 1921 to honor the 100-year anniversary of Mexico’s independence from Spain, with an approximate value of $1,500 each. Additional prizes include T-shirts and teddy bears.

The first Centenario prize winner was Julissa from Calexico, CA. The Centenario promotion is national in scope. Consumers still have a chance to win prizes, including more Centenario coins, because the promotion is scheduled to run through May, 2010, or until all prizes are awarded.

Mundet soft drinks are known for their unique and delicious real-apple flavor. Sidral Mundet does not contain any flavoring (natural or artificial), since its unique flavor comes from real apples. Mundet is popular with adults and children, and is considered by many to have health benefits due to its pasteurization process and since it does not contain caffeine. Many Mexican mothers use Mundet as a hydration fluid for their children.

Since 1988, Mundet soft drinks have been distributed in the United States exclusively by Novamex (www.novamex.com). Mundet is currently one of the best-selling Mexican soft drinks in the US. Novamex is a leader in the marketing and distribution of authentic Mexican products in the United States, including Jarritos, Mineragua and Mundet, delicious soft drinks with the great authentic flavor of Mexico. In additional to product sales, marketing and distribution, Novamex provides educational and sports opportunities to children and youth in high-Hispanic markets throughout the United States, and assists hundreds of churches and non-profit organizations through the donation of soft drinks that can be sold for fundraising purposes.
Source: Mundet

The Younger, Hipper Hispanic

The younger, hipper Hispanic target is most likely native-born in the US and differs greatly in their consumer behavior from older/immigrant Hispanics – they speak English fluently and tend to be familiar with main-stream American culture and have similar buying habits to whites, AA and other non-Hispanics.

The Younger, Hipper Hispanic

The Younger, Hipper Hispanic

Young blacks and Hispanic college graduates are reviving cities.  They live in funky row houses and apartments in old neighborhoods that have been spruced up.  They’re part of the ‘Bohemian Mix,’ a cluster that has a substantial percentage of blacks and Hispanics.  It’s the most affluent of the racially and ethnically diverse groups.  Bohemians socialize across racial lines, jog, shop at Banana Republic, read Vanity Fair, watch Friends and drive Audis.

Of note regarding youth in general: “Youth Digerati” (as opposed to the old nickname “Youth Literati”), an ethnically mixed group, is the most affluent urban cluster.  Young Digerati tend to live in fashionable neighborhoods and are now more affluent than “Money & Brains” – older professional couples who have few children and own homes in upscale city neighborhoods.
Source: TIA

Publix tries to appeal to Hispanic market in Georgia

Hispanic buying power in Georgia has grown by 1037% since 1990, No wonder Publix tries to appeal to Hispanic market in Georgia!

Norcross store gets makeover with focus on items from Mexico

“Do you have the sombrero? Has it arrived yet?”

It’s not the kind of question a grocery store manager overseeing the final details of a renovation would normally expect from a contractor. But for Marco Guillen, it’s just all in a day’s work.

Guillen is the point man on Publix Super Markets newest experiment — the first store outside of the company’s home turf in Florida designed to appeal to Hispanic shoppers.

The store, located in a heavily Hispanic neighborhood that Census records show is predominantly Mexican in origin, features bilingual signs and shelves stocked with more than 1,500 new Mexican and Central American items brought into the store in recent months.

Where Hispanic foods were once isolated in a single aisle, they’re now spread throughout the store. Dried guajillo chiles are piled up in a box in the produce section. Jarritos soft drinks take up shelf space near Coke and Pepsi products. Foca powder detergent is near the Tide. Colorful pinatas are scattered throughout.

“We really had to go out and challenge our suppliers to go out and get us items that are traditionally Mexican. Not Mexican-American, but Mexican,” said the company’s Atlanta spokeswoman, Brenda Reid.

The store also features a salsa bar, deli items meant to appeal to the Hispanic palate and an expanded number of Western Union terminals, popular with Hispanic immigrants sending money home. About half of its employees are bilingual, recruited from Publix stores all over metro Atlanta, Reid said.

The store has been slowly rolling out the changes for months. It formally debuts Thursday with a grand opening featuring a mariachi band and other festivities.

The effort is rooted in rising Hispanic buying power and increasing competition from ethnic groceries that cater to the fast-growing Hispanic and Asian communities, Reid said.

Hispanic buying power in Georgia has grown by 1037 percent since 1990, outstripping the 194 percent growth for the overall market by more than five times, according to the Selig Center for Economic Growth at the University of Georgia.

Hispanics now account for 5.1 percent of Georgia’s buying power and are projected to outpace the growth by all other ethnic groups, according to the center.

A spokesman for Kroger, metro Atlanta’s leading grocer, said his company hasn’t explicity labeled any one store to appeal to a specific demographic. But Glynn Jenkins said the company adjusts each store’s product mix to appeal to local tastes.

Publix tries to appeal to Hispanic market in Georgia

Guillen said the changes at his store have gone over well with both Hispanic and non-Hispanic customers. The store’s bright new color palette and the fact that the store only eliminated a handful of unpopular items to make way for its new Hispanic product mix continues to bring in customers of all stripes, he said.

Source: The Atlanta Journal-Constitution – Michael Pearson

Profile of Hispanics Online

Profile of Hispanics Online

Profile of Hispanics Online

Hispanics are entering cyberspace more quickly than other ethnic groups – Internet use jumped 7.4 percent in 2004 after an 8 percent spurt in 2003.  The typical Hispanic-American Internet user is age 28, slightly more likely to be male and unmarried, according to a study by the Association of Hispanic Advertising Agencies.  Half of all Hispanic-American Internet users are Spanish-language dominant, meaning that they speak Spanish at home more than English (Preparer’s Note: this could be attributed to their family-oriented lifestyle and may not necessarily affect the way younger Hispanics use the Internet).

This particular study found that the profile of Hispanics Online is:
• Hispanics spend almost 5-1/2 hours online weekly

• 71 percent of their usage is from a home computer

• 75% use the Internet for email

• 60% to get news

• 54% to listen to music

• 43% to chat

A March 2004 study by AOL/Roper ASW shows that 14 million Hispanics in the US are online. While this is already an impressive number, the growth rate is even more impressive. About 20% of online Hispanics had connected their households to the Internet less than six months earlier. More than half who were not yet online expected to connect within the next two years.  The more Latinos connect online, the less time they spend with other Spanish media, such as print or TV. Marketers will increasingly want to reflect this shift in media consumption in their advertising budgets.

Uncovered Facts About Online Hispanic Women and their Media Usage
Elianne Ramos is the principal and CEO of Speak Hispanic Communications and vice-chair of Communications and PR for LATISM.
never lose your sense of wonder
Social sites eclipse e-mail use

Source: TIA

Strategic Alliance Between Televisa and Genomma Lab

Grupo Televisa, S.A.B. (“Televisa”; NYSE: TV; BMV: TLEVISA CPO) and Genomma Lab Internacional, S.A.B. de C.V. (“Genomma Lab”; BMV: LAB B) announced today that they have signed a strategic alliance agreement to sell and distribute personal care and over the counter pharmaceuticals in the United States and Puerto Rico.

The strategic alliance will operate through Televisa Consumer Products USA (“TCP”) a company owned 51% by Televisa and 49% by Genomma Lab. The sale and distribution of Genomma Lab’s products will be an integral part of the activities of TCP.

As part of this alliance, TCP will enter into, among others, a product supply agreement with Genomma Lab. Televisa will make available its different media platforms in the United States and Puerto Rico to TCP, which will provide Genomma Lab’s brands with significant advertising in the targeted markets in line with Genomma Lab’s business model.

This will enable Genomma Lab to expand the extensive success of its brands beyond Mexico and Latin America by accessing a Hispanic market of approximately 50 million consumers with a purchasing power of over $870 billion annually while leveraging off of Televisa’s reach and name recognition in the Hispanic market.

Subject to certain conditions, the parties contemplate closing the transaction in the following months and launching operations by year end.

About Grupo Televisa, S.A.B

Grupo Televisa, S.A.B., is the largest media company in the Spanish-speaking world and a major participant in the international entertainment business. It has interests in television production and broadcasting, production of pay-television networks, international distribution of television programming, direct to home satellite services, cable television and telecommunication services, magazine publishing and publishing distribution, radio production and broadcasting, professional sports and live entertainment, feature-film production and distribution, the operation of an internet portal, and gaming. Grupo Televisa also owns an unconsolidated equity stake in La Sexta, a free-to-air television venture in Spain.

 

About Genomma Lab Internacional, S.A.B. de C.V.

Genomma Lab Internacional, S.A.B. de C.V. is one of the fastest growing pharmaceutical and personal care products companies in Mexico and has an increasing presence in the international markets. Genomma Lab develops, sells and markets a broad range of premium branded products, many of which are leaders in the categories in which they compete in terms of sales and market share. The Company has significantly grown its revenue and profitability through a combination of a successful new product development process, consumer-oriented marketing, a broad retail distribution network and a low-cost, highly flexible operating model.

Source: Genomma Lab Internacional, S.A.B. de C.V.

People still prefer real-life recommendations to online

Word of Mouth and Viral Marketing

Word of Mouth and Viral Marketing: real-life recommendations preferred?

Word of Mouth and Viral Marketing: real-life recommendations preferred?

Referring a product or service is not a new idea, it’s been around as long as people have—but is the way people make recommendations changing with the times? Despite increased online activity, new research from Mintel shows real-life recommendations are still more influential to consumers than those received online.
Mintel’s exclusive consumer survey showed most people who bought a product or service based off a recommendation did so on a referral from a friend/relative or husband/wife/partner (34% and 25%, respectively). Only 5% of respondents bought based on the recommendation of a blogger, the same for a chat room.

“It’s interesting to find that as much time as we spend online, we still prefer a personal recommendation from someone we know and trust,” states Chris Haack, senior analyst at Mintel. “Young adults are somewhat more likely to turn to the Internet for advice and referrals, but even they listen to their peers first.”

Most people base a recommendation on price and convenience, according to Mintel. Especially in the current economic climate, where shoppers are compelled to find the lowest price, it’s not surprising that more than 64% of respondents state that price drove them to recommend a product or service, while quality (55%) and convenience (33%) follow behind.

Mintel reports that Asian and Hispanic respondents are considerably more likely to recommend a product they saw advertised. Asians (14%) and Hispanics (10%) are also more likely to report being influenced by bloggers to purchase a specific product or service.

“The sheer number of people that purchase based on recommendations proves marketers need to pay attention to word of mouth,” states Chris Haack. “It’s becoming easier for businesses to lose control of their marketing messages, so companies need to carefully monitor and respond to consumer conversations about their brands.”

Source: http://www.mintel.com

Burger King enters mobile commerce full-throttle

Fast-food giant Burger King has entered the mobile commerce arena by letting consumers place orders and pay for them their iPhone. Now that’s fast food.

Restaurant locator - Burger King enters mobile commerce full-throttle

Burger King enters mobile commerce full-throttle – Restaurant locator

Burger King Mobile Restaurant Locator

Burger King teamed up with Gomobo and PointAbout for the development and design of the application. The Burger King NOW location-aware iPhone application is currently being tested in the Queens, New York, area.

“The idea of the iPhone app is to go the full nine yards with a rich mobile ordering platform,” said Noah N. Glass, founder CEO of Gomobo, New York. “This is the first case study that we have done with an iPhone application and we expect to launch these types of applications for other quick-serve restaurants we are working with.”

Gomobo helps fast-food and restaurant chains mobilize their services via mobile Web sites, and now through iPhone apps as well. Clients include Subway and Dunkin’ Donuts.

Burger King, the nation’s No. 2 burger-and-fries chain after McDonald’s Corp., has been known for its innovation with new technology, including its highly viral Subservient Chicken online viral marketing campaign earlier in the decade. Ordering and paying through the iPhone application is part of that DNA.

The iPhone’s GPS functionality lets users skip the step of entering in an address into the app. Instead it automatically finds the Burger King location closest to them.

When users place their order and come in to pick it up, they can skip the line and just grab their food, since they have paid for it via the app.

The application also tracks and saves order history and then acts as a loyalty card by offering incentives and deals.

Customize your Burger King meal

Burger King enters mobile commerce full-throttle

Burger King enters mobile commerce full-throttle

The goal behind this application is to drive incremental same-store sales – a key metric for the restaurant industry, Mr. Glass said. He also said that orders placed via the application have been 25 percent larger than in-store.

When customers start using the service, they increase their frequency of visits by 42 percent and the mobile offering takes existing loyal customers and increases their value by 75 percent.

The application is helping Burger King drive additional sales, since new customers can discover the stores near them that they may have not known about previously.

In terms of security, the application is fully secure. So, customers don’t have to worry about their credit card information being misused.

Also, the information is stored within the application, so that it doesn’t need to be re-entered each time the customer places an order.

When picking up their food, customers just need to give the last four digits of their mobile number, to confirm they are in fact the person that placed the order.

PointAbout helped Gomobo develop the application. It took the guts of the Burger King mobile site, which was developed by Gomobo, and poured it all into an iPhone experience.

Also, PointAbout made it possible for the application to remember the phone ID and allowed it to pull GPS information.

“Traditionally QSRs have focused on the four walls concept, which means doing marketing within the four walls of the restaurant,” Mr. Glass said. “They focused on what could be done in-store to make sure that patrons come back

“The mobile device allows them to extend where transactions take place and let customers make transactions from anywhere, therefore extending those four walls to the consumer’s hands,” he said. “It is also a much more efficient way of taking an order and the payment.”
Source: Mobile Marketer

Mundet, the Wonderful Apple Soft Drink Centenario Promotion

Mundet announces the first winner of its national Centenario promotion — Julissa from Calexico, California. This contest commemorates the 100+- year heritage of Mundet, offering exciting prizes under special gold bottlecaps that can be found on Mundet Manzana Verde (Green Apple) and Sidral (Original Red Apple) Mundet bottles.

Mundet, the delicious apple-based soft drink which has been a part of the Mexican heritage since the early 20th century, is celebrating its 100+-year heritage with an exciting Centenario promotion. Consumers have the opportunity to win exciting instant-win prizes located under special gold bottlecaps found on Mundet Green Apple and Sidral Mundet glass bottles. The grand prizes are Centenarios, Mexican bullion coins created in 1921 to honor the 100-year anniversary of Mexico’s independence from Spain, with an approximate value of $1,500 each. Additional prizes include T-shirts and teddy bears.

The first Centenario prize winner was Julissa from Calexico, CA. The Centenario promotion is national in scope. Consumers still have a chance to win prizes, including more Centenario coins, because the promotion is scheduled to run through May, 2010, or until all prizes are awarded.

Mundet soft drinks are known for their unique and delicious real-apple flavor. Sidral Mundet does not contain any flavoring (natural or artificial), since its unique flavor comes from real apples. Mundet is popular with adults and children, and is considered by many to have health benefits due to its pasteurization process and since it does not contain caffeine. Many Mexican mothers use Mundet as a hydration fluid for their children.

Since 1988, Mundet soft drinks have been distributed in the United States exclusively by Novamex (www.novamex.com). Mundet is currently one of the best-selling Mexican soft drinks in the US. Novamex is a leader in the marketing and distribution of authentic Mexican products in the United States, including Jarritos, Mineragua and Mundet, delicious soft drinks with the great authentic flavor of Mexico. In additional to product sales, marketing and distribution, Novamex provides educational and sports opportunities to children and youth in high-Hispanic markets throughout the United States, and assists hundreds of churches and non-profit organizations through the donation of soft drinks that can be sold for fundraising purposes.
Source: Mundet

The Younger, Hipper Hispanic

The younger, hipper Hispanic target is most likely native-born in the US and differs greatly in their consumer behavior from older/immigrant Hispanics – they speak English fluently and tend to be familiar with main-stream American culture and have similar buying habits to whites, AA and other non-Hispanics.

The Younger, Hipper Hispanic

The Younger, Hipper Hispanic

Young blacks and Hispanic college graduates are reviving cities.  They live in funky row houses and apartments in old neighborhoods that have been spruced up.  They’re part of the ‘Bohemian Mix,’ a cluster that has a substantial percentage of blacks and Hispanics.  It’s the most affluent of the racially and ethnically diverse groups.  Bohemians socialize across racial lines, jog, shop at Banana Republic, read Vanity Fair, watch Friends and drive Audis.

Of note regarding youth in general: “Youth Digerati” (as opposed to the old nickname “Youth Literati”), an ethnically mixed group, is the most affluent urban cluster.  Young Digerati tend to live in fashionable neighborhoods and are now more affluent than “Money & Brains” – older professional couples who have few children and own homes in upscale city neighborhoods.
Source: TIA

Publix tries to appeal to Hispanic market in Georgia

Hispanic buying power in Georgia has grown by 1037% since 1990, No wonder Publix tries to appeal to Hispanic market in Georgia!

Norcross store gets makeover with focus on items from Mexico

“Do you have the sombrero? Has it arrived yet?”

It’s not the kind of question a grocery store manager overseeing the final details of a renovation would normally expect from a contractor. But for Marco Guillen, it’s just all in a day’s work.

Guillen is the point man on Publix Super Markets newest experiment — the first store outside of the company’s home turf in Florida designed to appeal to Hispanic shoppers.

The store, located in a heavily Hispanic neighborhood that Census records show is predominantly Mexican in origin, features bilingual signs and shelves stocked with more than 1,500 new Mexican and Central American items brought into the store in recent months.

Where Hispanic foods were once isolated in a single aisle, they’re now spread throughout the store. Dried guajillo chiles are piled up in a box in the produce section. Jarritos soft drinks take up shelf space near Coke and Pepsi products. Foca powder detergent is near the Tide. Colorful pinatas are scattered throughout.

“We really had to go out and challenge our suppliers to go out and get us items that are traditionally Mexican. Not Mexican-American, but Mexican,” said the company’s Atlanta spokeswoman, Brenda Reid.

The store also features a salsa bar, deli items meant to appeal to the Hispanic palate and an expanded number of Western Union terminals, popular with Hispanic immigrants sending money home. About half of its employees are bilingual, recruited from Publix stores all over metro Atlanta, Reid said.

The store has been slowly rolling out the changes for months. It formally debuts Thursday with a grand opening featuring a mariachi band and other festivities.

The effort is rooted in rising Hispanic buying power and increasing competition from ethnic groceries that cater to the fast-growing Hispanic and Asian communities, Reid said.

Hispanic buying power in Georgia has grown by 1037 percent since 1990, outstripping the 194 percent growth for the overall market by more than five times, according to the Selig Center for Economic Growth at the University of Georgia.

Hispanics now account for 5.1 percent of Georgia’s buying power and are projected to outpace the growth by all other ethnic groups, according to the center.

A spokesman for Kroger, metro Atlanta’s leading grocer, said his company hasn’t explicity labeled any one store to appeal to a specific demographic. But Glynn Jenkins said the company adjusts each store’s product mix to appeal to local tastes.

Publix tries to appeal to Hispanic market in Georgia

Guillen said the changes at his store have gone over well with both Hispanic and non-Hispanic customers. The store’s bright new color palette and the fact that the store only eliminated a handful of unpopular items to make way for its new Hispanic product mix continues to bring in customers of all stripes, he said.

Source: The Atlanta Journal-Constitution – Michael Pearson

Profile of Hispanics Online

Profile of Hispanics Online

Profile of Hispanics Online

Hispanics are entering cyberspace more quickly than other ethnic groups – Internet use jumped 7.4 percent in 2004 after an 8 percent spurt in 2003.  The typical Hispanic-American Internet user is age 28, slightly more likely to be male and unmarried, according to a study by the Association of Hispanic Advertising Agencies.  Half of all Hispanic-American Internet users are Spanish-language dominant, meaning that they speak Spanish at home more than English (Preparer’s Note: this could be attributed to their family-oriented lifestyle and may not necessarily affect the way younger Hispanics use the Internet).

This particular study found that the profile of Hispanics Online is:
• Hispanics spend almost 5-1/2 hours online weekly

• 71 percent of their usage is from a home computer

• 75% use the Internet for email

• 60% to get news

• 54% to listen to music

• 43% to chat

A March 2004 study by AOL/Roper ASW shows that 14 million Hispanics in the US are online. While this is already an impressive number, the growth rate is even more impressive. About 20% of online Hispanics had connected their households to the Internet less than six months earlier. More than half who were not yet online expected to connect within the next two years.  The more Latinos connect online, the less time they spend with other Spanish media, such as print or TV. Marketers will increasingly want to reflect this shift in media consumption in their advertising budgets.

Uncovered Facts About Online Hispanic Women and their Media Usage
Elianne Ramos is the principal and CEO of Speak Hispanic Communications and vice-chair of Communications and PR for LATISM.
never lose your sense of wonder
Social sites eclipse e-mail use

Source: TIA

Today’s Hispanic Consumer

When targeting the multicultural market, race and ethnicity are becoming less important than education, income, home ownership, age and lifestyles.  Hispanics, African-Americans and Asian-Americans are moving to middle-class suburbs and prosperous neighborhoods, and are identified more by their lifestyles and spending habits than by their ancestry.

Today's Hispanic Consumer - Hispanic Marketing Basics

Today’s Hispanic Consumer – Hispanic Marketing Basics

The composition of the Hispanic population is shifting.  Hispanics now account for 13.7% of the total population.  The “new dynamics” of the Hispanic market hinge on the emerging second and third generations, native- and foreign-born differences, and broad geographic growth.

According to a Census Bureau report released in June 2004, an estimated 39.8 million Latinos live in the U.S., an increase of almost 13% since the 2000 Census. It projects Hispanics will increase their ranks by 188% to 102.6 million—or roughly one-quarter of the population—by 2050.  Hispanics will count for nearly one out of every five U.S. residents by 2012 if current growth rates continue.

The Hispanic Consumer now constitutes the largest minority group in the United States, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, comprising 13 percent of the population, or 39 million people. Moreover, their buying power has nearly tripled, from $222 billion in 1990 to $653 billion in 2003, according to a University of Georgia report.

The spending power of the U.S. Hispanic Consumer is also increasing.  The median income of Hispanic households rose 20 percent from $27,977 to $33,565 between 1996 and 2001, while the median for all U.S. households climbed just 6 percent.

“Whether a Latino household wants to buy a lawn mower has less to do with their ethnicity than if they happen to be homeowners,” says Michael Mancini of Claritas. The two great forces, age and diversity, have rendered the traditional marketing categories irrelevant in many cases.

One of the most common mistakes advertising executives make when marketing to a Hispanic consumer is assuming that the U.S. Hispanic population is homogeneous.
Source: TIA

Ad Age Hispanic Advertising Awards intro [video]

2007 Ad Age Hispanic Advertising Awards – Bumpers video

Emotions experienced while watching this ad are diverse, but it definitely keeps you engaged. The message, or at least my interpretation of the message, is that most media is dead when reaching Hispanics or maybe that you really have to know what makes the market “happy” in order to reach it.

Client: Ad Age Hispanic Advertising Awards
Agency: Dieste Harmel & Partners, San Francisco
Executive Creative Director: Carlos Tourne
Senior Creative Director: Raymundo Valdez
Senior Copywriter: Alex Toedtli
Art Director: Eduardo Cintron
Agency Producer: Angel LaRiva
Production Company: Radium
Director: Brady Baltezore
Producer: Tim Pries
Music/Sound Design: The Lodge

Please, feel free to send feedback! and enjoy!

Hispanic Consumer Shopping Behavior Insights

As National Hispanic Heritage Month is underway to recognize the impact of Hispanic culture in the United States, the Nielsen Company provides insight into the shopping behavior of Hispanic consumers, a collective buying power of nearly $1 trillion.

Hispanic Consumer Shopping Behavior Insights

Hispanic Consumer Shopping Behavior Insights

“It is critical for retailers and marketers to understand the wide range of factors driving Hispanic consumers’ shopping behavior,” said Tim Kregor, president, Nielsen Consumer Panel Services. “By understanding what Hispanic consumers are buying, where they’re buying it, how they’re buying it and why, retailers and marketers can adapt product offerings and promotions to ultimately better satisfy this rapidly growing and diverse consumer segment.”

Hispanic Consumer Shopping Behavior Insights on Brand Loyalty

Nielsen Homescan research across multiple product categories shows that as Hispanics become more acculturated, there is less evidence of brand loyalty. For example, select brand/flavors of carbonated soft drinks shows that 33 percent of English language-only/preferred Hispanics met their needs with a particular cola, while nearly 70 percent of Spanish language-preferred homes fulfilled their carbonated beverage requirements with the identical brand. Similar trends were noted for other categories, such as laundry detergent, cereal, toothpaste and beer. In this example, language serves as the primary measure of determining acculturation level, which influences Hispanic consumers’ brand loyalty and shopping habits.

“When it comes to brand loyalty and the Hispanic consumer, the key learning for marketers is understanding the importance of building a brand relationship during the initial stages of acculturation and maintaining this connection as Hispanics’ integration to American life increases,” said Kregor.

Hispanic Consumer Shopping Behavior Insights: A Touch of Home

Nielsen finds there is a preference among Hispanics to shop at stores that resonate with the sights, sounds, smells and sensibilities of their homeland. This sense of nostalgia helps create an important connection with the Hispanic consumer. Retailers can create a familiar sense of community and comfort zone for consumers through product assortment, importing specialty lines and stocking items with bilingual packaging, hiring bilingual employees, posting bilingual signage and distributing bilingual coupons.

Hispanic Consumer Shopping Behavior Insights: Shopping a Family Affair

For Hispanic consumers, shopping can be a family affair, an outing for all ages from abuelos (grandparents) to ninos (children). Retailers wanting to attract the attention of the Hispanic consumer would benefit from creating a family-friendly atmosphere, such as balloons and providing rest areas for seniors. And, while respect is a fundamental of customer relations across the board, there is a certain reverence extended to elders within the Hispanic culture that should be reflected in staff dealings with older shoppers. “This can be as simple as offering an arm to an unsteady patron navigating the aisle, or selecting hard-to-reach items for their cart.”

Hispanic Consumer Shopping Behavior Insights: Staying Connected

In addition to maintaining tight-knit family units and neighborhoods, many Hispanics make a concerted effort to keep in touch with those living in their homelands. According to Scarborough Research, a service of The Nielsen Company, Hispanics of all language preference are heavy users of phone service, 95 percent more likely than the average consumer to have spent $100 on long distance, and 18 percent more likely to have rung up a cell phone bill of $150 or more during the last month. Searching for a more favorable deal, Hispanic consumers are more likely to plan on switching cellular providers during the next year, and 11 percent more likely to use a prepaid cellular plan.

When it comes to Internet purchases, Scarborough Research finds that roughly 25 percent of Hispanic Internet users purchased airline tickets, books and clothing/accessories online in the past year, with six percent spending more than $2,500 online during that time.

Hispanic Consumer Shopping Behavior Insights: Media Views

Between 2000 and 2007, Nielsen Media Research estimates the number of Hispanic TV households expanded by one-third, from 8.7 million to 11.6 million. Concurrently, all demographic groups decreased slightly for Hispanics, except adults ages 18 and up, which increased slightly. While cable and pay cable gained popularity among Hispanic viewers, VCR ownership slipped.

TV usage habits parallel that of the average household, with Hispanic homes tuning in 58 hours and 39 seconds per week, slightly more than the 57 hours and 39 seconds of the composite finding. Hispanics scored lower on viewing per TV households as well, for every measure except children ages 2 – 11, who watched a mere one minute more than the composite result per week.
Source: Hispanic PR Wire