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Microsoft commercial – what were they thinking?

by Claudia Havi Goffan

Microsoft should really think before approving a commercial like the one featuring Bill Gates and Jerry Seinfield. That is, unless their tactic is to alienate the Hispanic community.

The Microsoft commercial is riddled with Hispanic stereotypes. First, the “churro” (would that be a metaphor for moist and juicy for Hispanics?), then the “Conquistador” (would that be the shoe or a Bill Gates allegory?), and third, the Hispanic family eating churros – of course, mother, father and three children – staring from outside of a shoe discount store.

To top it all off, the English phrase, “they run tight” is poorly translated into “ellos van apretados” in an attempt to convey that the shoe runs a size smaller and that both Bill and Jerry are friends (???) – Bill, do you (or your agency or your marketing department) even know what “ellos van apretados” means in Spanish? It’s not even close to the English version! If you are referring to the shoes, you could transliterate it into “son talles mas pequeños” and if you are referring to the closeness between the two characters, it could be “son muy amigos”.

Microsoft commercial – what were they thinking?

I am not even going to discuss about the ad credibility factor because, how believable is that Bill or Jerry shop at a shoe discount store? Or for that matter, that Bill Gates buys “pleather” shoes? Or that you would be able to eat an operating system?

Microsoft, you missed the mark and offended a large percentage of your Hispanic target market.

Adoptable trends campaign by Dieste
Roundhouse Mini Cooper London guerilla marketing ads
Win a $5,000 Foodie experience with this original Visa bus advertising
Advertising campaign "Show your Joe"
Can you see the elephant in the room? ;)

Can you see the elephant in the room? 😉

 

Microsoft commercial – what were they thinking?

by Claudia Havi Goffan

Microsoft should really think before approving a commercial like the one featuring Bill Gates and Jerry Seinfield. That is, unless their tactic is to alienate the Hispanic community.

The Microsoft commercial is riddled with Hispanic stereotypes. First, the “churro” (would that be a metaphor for moist and juicy for Hispanics?), then the “Conquistador” (would that be the shoe or a Bill Gates allegory?), and third, the Hispanic family eating churros – of course, mother, father and three children – staring from outside of a shoe discount store.

To top it all off, the English phrase, “they run tight” is poorly translated into “ellos van apretados” in an attempt to convey that the shoe runs a size smaller and that both Bill and Jerry are friends (???) – Bill, do you (or your agency or your marketing department) even know what “ellos van apretados” means in Spanish? It’s not even close to the English version! If you are referring to the shoes, you could transliterate it into “son talles mas pequeños” and if you are referring to the closeness between the two characters, it could be “son muy amigos”.

Microsoft commercial – what were they thinking?

I am not even going to discuss about the ad credibility factor because, how believable is that Bill or Jerry shop at a shoe discount store? Or for that matter, that Bill Gates buys “pleather” shoes? Or that you would be able to eat an operating system?

Microsoft, you missed the mark and offended a large percentage of your Hispanic target market.

Adoptable trends campaign by Dieste
Roundhouse Mini Cooper London guerilla marketing ads
Win a $5,000 Foodie experience with this original Visa bus advertising
Advertising campaign "Show your Joe"
Can you see the elephant in the room? ;)

Can you see the elephant in the room? 😉

 

Many uses of soccer in commercials

by Claudia Havi Goffan

Have you ever wondered about the versatility of soccer in commercials? Well… we did. Here are a few brands that use soccer in their commercials very cleverly. We will start with the most expected uses for soccer and finalize with the most original ones. We hope you enjoy them as much as we did.

every time you manage to find humor in a situation you win

every time you manage to find humor in a situation you win

Nike and a sci-fi spy twist

Adidas – nothing is impossible

A couple of children play the soccer game of their dreams. Best use of soccer in commercials ever!

another use of soccer… Isenbeck… anti official sponsor
Super original idea to advertise yourself as the “anti” official sponsor especially if you don’t have the budget!

Subtitles:
Brazil Autralia is coming up. So we decided to unite our cultures to achieve a common goal and say: Jump, jump, jump, little kangaroo, because we are going to bust the Brazilian’s …. Let’s celebrate with an Isenbeck for 2 pesos. Because you are not going to celebrate Brazil’s misfortune with a PIP beer sold by the Brazilians, right? Isenbeck, anti official sponsor of the Brazilian team

Commercial Direct TV
No need for words—this commercial taps into the Latin American man’s heart—first, soccer and then family, just kidding

Child’s Trust Fund—ever thought they could use soccer like this?

Let us know if you like them and feel free to send us links to your favorites!

Gatorade World Cup 2014 Ad
Aflac launches TV commercial for Hispanics
Hispanic women and Sports - Soccer or football
Sprint Lets Soccer Fans Enjoy the Game Now

Cultural differences: its impact on Customer acquisition and retention

by Claudia Havi Goffan

A close look at how Cultural Differences impact Customer Acquisition and Retention Strategies.

When I arrived to the U.S., 18 years ago, I opened a checking Account with Bank of America. It was obvious. The name, Bank of America, carried in it a familiarity that no other bank did. I, too, was born in America, the continent of America. What people do not know is that in Latin American schools teach you that America is a single continent divided into three parts, North, Central and South America. This is the reason that you may have heard Latinos say: “we are American too.” Back to my story, Bank of America, one; other banks, zero.

It is essential for people in business to understand Cultural DifferencesA few months later, and having maintained what I thought was an excellent relationship with the bank, I decided to fill out an application for a credit card, “the Bank of America VISA.” After three long weeks, I received a letter stating that my application had been denied without a reason given. I got really upset and went to the bank to let hell loose. I had been a wonderful customer and had more than enough money in my account—and they knew it- in order to respond to whatever spending limit they could give me. The answer was: “You need to call Visa, we (Bank of America) don’t have anything to do with this.” I immediately called Visa and was told that my request had been denied because I didn’t exist. “Didn’t exist? But here I am, I exist,” was my response with utter disbelief. The lady explained that I didn’t have a credit history. Until then, I never knew a credit history existed. No such concept existed in my home country where people purchase a home with cash and they don’t pay their bills with checks, as they will get “lost” in the mail (but that’s a different story and the beginning of more cultural differences). In the end, I realized that I wasn’t going to get my credit card with Bank of America or VISA. What a disappointment. And, what an insult to tell me I didn’t exist.

I decided to fill out an application with American Express. Two weeks later, a person from American Express called me at home and wanted to know why they couldn’t find any credit history on me. Now, that’s service! I told her I had lived in the U.S. for just a few months. She replied: “Perfectly understandable. You will receive your card in the mail within 2 weeks.” Needless to say, I never forgot my experience with VISA or with American Express. I have been a loyal customer of American Express since 1991, always preferring to use my AMEX to any other credit card.

Lesson to be learned: Listen to your customers. Cultural differences may be found where you least expect them. You may get lucky the first time, the second time around, you’d better know what you are doing.

Customer Acquisition and Retention Efforts

A bit of background on the Latin American financial system

The concept of a credit history was introduced only a few years ago in Latin American countries.

There are financial infrastructure obstacles common to the Latin American region, such as uneven income distribution, low penetration of the banking system, low computer usage, and very famous “informal” economies that function only in cash. Remittances from family members abroad only increase the number of cash transactions.

The banking crisis of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico and Venezuela in the late 1990s enabled a large financial reform and the modernization of the financial infrastructure. One of the changes was the adoption of credit history.

Culture Code for Money - The Insider’s Guide
Hispanic Acculturation Process
Multicultural Marketing
Study Finds US Hispanics Rate Products Significantly Higher Than Non-Hispanics Based on Culture Alone
Hispanic women and Sports - Soccer or football

Thought of the day

you think you are smart until you try to turn on someone else's shower

you think you are smart until you try to turn on someone else’s shower

10% of the conflicts are due to difference in opinion and 90% to wrong tone of voice

10% of the conflicts are due to difference in opinion and 90% to wrong tone of voice

An Ad that connects with the U.S. Hispanic Consumer

by Claudia Havi Goffan

Hispanic Advertising is about connecting with the U.S. Hispanic Consumer and their real-life experiences and, sometimes, it is simpler than imagined. Learn how Oreo reached the Hispanic Consumer with this outstanding campaign.

In my everyday life, I pay attention to advertisements—I simply love them. No matter where they are—TV, magazines, newspapers and even billboards—I can’t get enough of them. The one exception is Internet ads. They have to be extraordinary to capture my attention as a marketer. Companies are just simply not investing enough creativity on them yet. As a Hispanic marketer and a Latino woman, my heart melts when I realize a company has made “the” total connection with the Hispanic consumer. A great example is this magazine ad that Nabisco produced for its Oreo brand.

It features a dad, a child, an Oreo cookie with the caption: “Dad learns to eat Oreos from me.”

This Oreo Print Ad speaks to the Hispanic market acculturation experience

This Oreo Print Ad speaks to the Hispanic market acculturation experience

Hispanic children, either born in the U.S. or abroad, are exposed to many experiences that their non- or semi-acculturated parents may never experience, unless it’s through them. So, how do you think a Hispanic dad will learn to eat an Oreo the American way?

That’s why this ad works. There are no stereotypes. There is only a human truth.

Bilingual Advertising Campaign Pepsi Next
never lose your sense of wonder
Multicultural Marketing
Wendy's Launches Campaign for Hispanic Consumer Market

Quote of the Day

Absolutely love reading this quote. I never get tired of it. Apple Ad great words

Apple Ad great words

Reaching Hispanic businesses

You may think Reaching Hispanic businesses is simple. Discover how to truly bond with these businesses so as to generate word-of-mouth and increased ROI.

by Claudia Havi Goffan

An amazing thing happened the other day. A colleague of mine and I decided to have lunch at a customer’s restaurant. On waiting to be seated, we noticed that the metal napkin holder on every table had a magnet of our bank. Let me correct myself, every napkin holder had two magnets, one on each side. We were honored by the endorsement and asked the owner why he did such a thing. He answered very candidly, “Because your bank was the first place in this country where they called me Señor.”

Reaching Hispanic businesses can be accomplished in many ways—purchasing lists—Hispanic Yellow Pages—etc. But to truly bond with these businesses so as to generate word-of-mouth is a completely different story. And here’s how you do it:

  • Make sure your product or service is in alignment with the market needs
  • Make sure your company can properly service this market
  • Show you care about the community
  • Build honest and trusting relationships
  • Make sure your message is one that your market will understand, relate to and engage

Maybe then and only then, you will be able to have the community endorse your company just like it did “our bank.”

#Reaching Hispanic businesses

This quote seems very appropriate when I think of those times I would advise reaching hispanic businesses in the manner described above and some people would actually look at me in disbelief. Of course, until they saw the results.

Always follow your instinct #greatquotes

Always follow your instinct #greatquotes

Intelligent Technologies You Should Know About
Managers' Hiring Practices Vary By Race, Ethnicity Says University of Miami Study
U.S. Census Facts for Features: Hispanic Heritage Month 2009