Posts

GOT MILK? Summer Milkshake Recipes

GOT MILK? Partners with Acclaimed BLD Pastry Chef to Share Summer Milkshake Recipes

Personality in a cup - New Hispanic flavors

Personality in a cup – New Hispanic flavors

There’s a saying that you could tell people’s personalities based on the types of drink they enjoy. A person who likes a chocolaty beverage, for example, could be described as sweet and indulgent, while someone who likes fruity drinks could be described as carefree and fun. Pastry Chef Mariah Swan of Los Angeles-based BLD & Grace Restaurants says the same could be said for those who enjoy milkshakes. Just in time for summer parties and socials, Swan and BLD have partnered with the California Milk Processor Board (CMPB), the creator of GOT MILK? to share delicious, decadent and whimsical milkshake recipes for treat-lovers to enjoy during the hot days of the season.

“Milk is not only a healthy beverage, it’s also the base for many fun drinks like milkshakes,” says Swan, a graduate of the California School of Culinary Arts and a pastry chef at BLD for two-and-a-half years. “Drinking a milkshake brings out the kid in everyone, but each flavor highlights a person’s personality.”

GOT MILK? Summer Milkshake Recipes

Available exclusively on www.gotmilk.com/recipes, Swan has created summer milkshake recipes for those who cannot resist this good old-fashioned treat. She features one-of-a-kind milkshakes in her menu, each carefully created to bring out a unique personality. They include:

1) Blueberry Malt Milkshake – blueberry, a typical summertime fruit combined with milk and vanilla ice cream for people who are jovial and who like an unexpected twist in their drink

2) Frozen Mexican Chocolate – a decadent drink blending cocoa powder, milk, cinnamon and brownies on ice for those who do not know the word “compromise”

3) Salted Caramel Milkshake – a treat consisting of milk, vanilla ice cream, caramel sauce and salt topped with whipped cream for people who consider themselves sassy and sweet

“These milkshakes are more than a treat,” says CMPB Executive Director Steve James. “They’re an absolute delight for kids of all ages. This milkshake program is one of the ways the CMPB hopes to educate consumers about the many creative ways they can incorporate milk in their diets.”

To also catch the favorite milkshake recipes of various political, entertainment and sports personalities that include San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom, Sacramento Mayor Kevin Johnson, Los Angeles City Council President Eric Garcetti, High School Musical and Dancing with the Stars Personality Monique Coleman and San Diego Padre slugger Adrian Gonzalez, please log on to www.gotmilk.com/recipes.

Source: California Milk Processor Board

Burger King enters mobile commerce full-throttle

Fast-food giant Burger King has entered the mobile commerce arena by letting consumers place orders and pay for them their iPhone. Now that’s fast food.

Restaurant locator - Burger King enters mobile commerce full-throttle

Burger King enters mobile commerce full-throttle – Restaurant locator

Burger King Mobile Restaurant Locator

Burger King teamed up with Gomobo and PointAbout for the development and design of the application. The Burger King NOW location-aware iPhone application is currently being tested in the Queens, New York, area.

“The idea of the iPhone app is to go the full nine yards with a rich mobile ordering platform,” said Noah N. Glass, founder CEO of Gomobo, New York. “This is the first case study that we have done with an iPhone application and we expect to launch these types of applications for other quick-serve restaurants we are working with.”

Gomobo helps fast-food and restaurant chains mobilize their services via mobile Web sites, and now through iPhone apps as well. Clients include Subway and Dunkin’ Donuts.

Burger King, the nation’s No. 2 burger-and-fries chain after McDonald’s Corp., has been known for its innovation with new technology, including its highly viral Subservient Chicken online viral marketing campaign earlier in the decade. Ordering and paying through the iPhone application is part of that DNA.

The iPhone’s GPS functionality lets users skip the step of entering in an address into the app. Instead it automatically finds the Burger King location closest to them.

When users place their order and come in to pick it up, they can skip the line and just grab their food, since they have paid for it via the app.

The application also tracks and saves order history and then acts as a loyalty card by offering incentives and deals.

Customize your Burger King meal

Burger King enters mobile commerce full-throttle

Burger King enters mobile commerce full-throttle

The goal behind this application is to drive incremental same-store sales – a key metric for the restaurant industry, Mr. Glass said. He also said that orders placed via the application have been 25 percent larger than in-store.

When customers start using the service, they increase their frequency of visits by 42 percent and the mobile offering takes existing loyal customers and increases their value by 75 percent.

The application is helping Burger King drive additional sales, since new customers can discover the stores near them that they may have not known about previously.

In terms of security, the application is fully secure. So, customers don’t have to worry about their credit card information being misused.

Also, the information is stored within the application, so that it doesn’t need to be re-entered each time the customer places an order.

When picking up their food, customers just need to give the last four digits of their mobile number, to confirm they are in fact the person that placed the order.

PointAbout helped Gomobo develop the application. It took the guts of the Burger King mobile site, which was developed by Gomobo, and poured it all into an iPhone experience.

Also, PointAbout made it possible for the application to remember the phone ID and allowed it to pull GPS information.

“Traditionally QSRs have focused on the four walls concept, which means doing marketing within the four walls of the restaurant,” Mr. Glass said. “They focused on what could be done in-store to make sure that patrons come back

“The mobile device allows them to extend where transactions take place and let customers make transactions from anywhere, therefore extending those four walls to the consumer’s hands,” he said. “It is also a much more efficient way of taking an order and the payment.”
Source: Mobile Marketer

Levelup.com Breaks the Alexa Top 2,000 Sites in the World

Busca Corp announced today that on Sunday July 19th Levelup.com –www.levelup.com) our flagship site and an integral part of the Busca Corp Network — has cracked Alexa’s Top 2,000 sites in the world. With over 10 million total network page views, Levelup.com has transformed into one of the top sites in Mexico and Latin America.

“The growth of Levelup.com is a testament to the 60 Billion Dollar Video Game market,” says Ramon Toledo, President of Busca Corp Media Network. “Through our partnership with Prodigy MSN we are well positioned as the #1 Video Game Site for the Latin American and U.S. Hispanic audience.”

Prodigy MSN is the most popular website in Mexico with over 23 million users and features a wide array of world-class services, such as Windows Live Hotmail, Windows Live Messenger, as well as video, news, and the latest in entertainment, lifestyle and sports. Our partnership aims to target the rapidly expanding video game user base which in the 1980’s meant mostly males under the age of 20 but today includes both male and female gamers under the age of 35.

Levelup.com publishes user-generated video game content alongside professionally produced media content that offers tips, strategies, reviews, comments and a place to share experiences with a fully engaged online community. With its unique platform, Levelup.com has experienced strong and steady growth since its launch in 2007.

Levelup.com also recently entered, and is aggressively attacking, the U.S. Hispanic Market and, is opening a largely untapped demographic with huge potential.

Source: Busca Corp

ViveMejor Summer Tips for You and Your Family!

Beauty expert Leonardo Rocco and Chef Marcela Valladolid share their secrets for summer fun on ViveMejor.com!

Summertime is finally here! Now that the kids are out of school, why arrange an expensive family getaway when you can experience a perfect day close to home? By staying close to home you can spend quality time with your loved ones, save money and discover more of your unexplored surroundings. Take full advantage of these perfect summer days with ViveMejor.com, your lifestyle resource. ViveMejor offers you tips on what to do with the family, how to prepare delicious meals that all can enjoy, and offers beauty tips so you can enjoy the summer in style!

Below are some fresh ideas to guide you on how to begin your perfect summer day with an outdoor picnic. Author, mom and Chef Marcela Valladolid offers some recipes that are delicious and affordable, so you can enjoy a fabulous lunch without breaking the bank!

1. Consider making use of your outdoor space this season and start a home garden with your family. Have each of your loved ones choose different things to plant and let your garden come alive! Take a few minutes each morning to weed and water your herbs and vegetables, so you can enjoy them for lunch or dinner once they ripen. Plant some cilantro, a popular herb in Hispanic dishes, and use it to make a Tropical Fruit Dip. This scrumptious appetizer goes wonderfully with papayas or mangoes, and is made with Hellmann’s(R) or Best Foods(R) Light Mayonnaise, providing real taste with half the fat and calories of Real Mayonnaise. Each tablespoon of this amazing dip is just $0.14(i)! By enjoying this treat while waiting for the main course you’re sure to start your lunch off right!!

2. After lunch, head to the beach, and make sure to pack plenty of beach toys to keep the kids busy. As they are enjoying their day in the sun and begin to get thirsty, give them a new and exciting drink like a Lemon Mo-tea- to, which is a great alternative to sodas! It is made with seltzer water, Lipton(R) Lemon Sugar Sweetened Iced Tea Mix and crushed mint leaves, which can also come from your very own home garden! The Lemon Mo-tea-to is quick, easy and full of flavor, so it is a summer refreshment that the whole family will love!

After spending an entire a day outside with your loved ones don’t be afraid to wind down and take some time for yourself after the kids go to bed. Take the opportunity to pamper yourself to make sure you look and feel great! With the summer humidity and rising temperatures, your beauty routine might change and hair and skin may become harder to manage. Luckily, beauty expert and celebrity stylist Leonardo Rocco is ready to share his secrets, tips and advice for looking as fabulous as ever during this season!

1. After a day in the sun, the heat and humidity can cause hair to become dry and damaged, making it harder to control. The key to gorgeous summer hair is moisturization. For salon proven performance without paying the salon price, use Suave Professionals(R) Damage Care Shampoo and Conditioner. This formula helps revitalize damaged hair, giving it a healthy-looking shine that will make other moms jealous! Try not to use blow dryers and straightening irons everyday when styling, as they will cause additional damage to your hair. Instead, try letting it air dry to show off its natural, glossy waves for a care-free look!

2. In addition to causing damage to your hair, spending a lot of time outdoors and in the sun can also wreak havoc on your skin. After cleansing your face at night make sure to keep it moisturized and healthy looking by using Pond’s(R) clarant B3. Besides serving as a great moisturizer, it is proven to even out women’s skin tone by reducing the appearance of dark spots in just 4 weeks You can always feel confident and put your best face forward while enjoying outdoor fun!

3. Finally, to avoid uncomfortable underarm wetness in your summer clothes, apply Dove Clinical Protection(R) at night before bed. Night time gives the unique prescription-strength formula time to work, building a strong level of 24-hour wetness protection that will help you feel confident while you’re out in the sun this summer!

With all these tips from Chef Marcela and Rocco, you are ready to enjoy the summer, eat well and look great while doing it, all at affordable prices! The only thing left to worry about is planning out the next exciting activity for you and your loved ones. Just make sure to enjoy the warm weather while it lasts!

For even more recipes, beauty tips, and money-saving coupons, don’t forget to visit www.ViveMejor.com!

(i) Based on average retail prices at national supermarkets.

About Unilever

Unilever’s mission is to add vitality to life. We meet everyday needs for nutrition, hygiene and personal care with brands that help people feel good, look good and get more out of life. Each day, around the world, consumers make 160 million decisions to purchase Unilever products.

In the United States, the portfolio includes major brand icons such as: Axe, Ben & Jerry’s, Bertolli, Breyers, Caress, Country Crock, Degree, Dove personal care products, Hellmann’s, Klondike, Knorr, Lipton, Popsicle, Promise, Q-Tips, Skippy, Slim-Fast, Suave, Sunsilk and Vaseline. All of the preceding brand names are registered trademarks of the Unilever Group of Companies. Dedicated to serving consumers and the communities where we live, work and play, Unilever employs nearly 12,000 people in both the United States and Puerto Rico — generating nearly $10 billion in sales in 2008. For more information, visit www.unileverusa.com.
Source: ViveMejor.com

What will the U.S. look like in 2050?

U.S. Population Projections: 2005–2050 - What will the U.S. look like in 2050?

U.S. Population Projections: 2005–2050 – What will the U.S. look like in 2050?

U.S. Population Projections: 2005–2050

What will the U.S. look like in 2050? Population and Immigration

Between 2005 and 2050, the nation’s population will increase to 438 million from 296 million, a rise of 142 million people that represents growth of 48%.

Immigrants who arrive after 2005, and their U.S.-born descendants, account for 82% of the projected national population increase during the 2005–2050 period.

Of  the 117 additional people attributable to the effect of new immigration, 67 million will be the immigrants themselves and 50 million will be their U.S.-born children and grandchildren

The nation’s foreign-born population, 36 million in 2005, is projected to rise to 81 million in 2050, growth of 129%.

In 2050, nearly one in five Americans (19%) will be an immigrant, compared with one in eight now (12% in 2005).

• The foreign-born share of the nation’s population will exceed historic highs sometime between 2020 and 2025, when it reaches 15%. The historic peak share was 14.7% in 1910 and 14.8% in 1890.

• Births in the United States will play a growing role in Hispanic and Asian population growth, so a diminishing proportion of both groups will be foreign-born.

What will the U.S. look like in 2050? Racial and Ethnic Groups

• The Hispanic population, 42 million in 2005, will rise to 128 million in 2050, tripling in size. Latinos will be 29% of the population, compared with 14% in 2005. Latinos will account for 60% of the nation’s population growth from 2005 to 2050.

• The black population, 38 million in 2005, will grow to 59 million in 2050, a rise of 56%. In 2050, the nation’s population will be 13.4% black, compared with 12.8% in 2005.

• The Asian population, 14 million in 2005, will grow to 41 million in 2050, nearly tripling in size. In 2050, the nation’s population will be 9% Asian, compared with 5% in 2005. Most Asians in the United States were foreign born in 2005 (58%), but by 2050, fewer than half (47%) will be.

• The white, non-Hispanic population, 199 million in 2005, will grow to 207 million in 2050, a 4% increase. In 2050, 47% of the U.S. population will be non-Hispanic white, compared with 67% in 2005.

What will the U.S. look like in 2050? Age Groups

• The working-age population—adults ages 18 to 64—will reach 255 million in 2050, up from 186 million in 2005. This segment will grow more slowly over the projection period (37%) than the overall population. Future immigrants and their descendants will account for all growth in this group.

• Among working-age adults, the foreign-born share, 15% in 2005, will rise to 23% in 2050. The Hispanic share, 14% in 2005, will increase to 31% in 2050. The non-Hispanic white share, 68% in 2005, will decline to 45% in 2050.

• The nation’s population of children ages 17 and younger will rise to 102 million in 2050, up from 73 million in 2005. The child population will grow more slowly in future decades (39%) than will the overall population. Future immigrants and their descendants will account for all growth in this population segment.

• Among children, the share who are immigrants or who have an immigrant parent will rise to 34% in 2050 from 23% in 2005. The share of children who are Hispanic, 20% in 2005, will rise to 35% in 2050. Non-Hispanic whites, who make up 59% of today’s children, will be 40% of children in 2050.

• The nation’s elderly population— people ages 65 and older—will grow to 81 million in 2050, up from 37 million in 2005. This group will grow more rapidly than the overall population, so its share will increase to 19% in 2050, from 12% in 2005. Immigration will account for only a small part of that growth.

• The dependency ratio—the number of people of working age, compared with the number of young and elderly—will rise sharply, mainly because of growth in the elderly population. There were 59 children and elderly people per 100 adults of working age in 2005. That will rise to 72 dependents per 100 adults of working age in 2050.

What will the U.S. look like in 2050? Alternative Projection Scenarios

• Under a lower-immigration scenario, the total population would rise to 384 million, the foreign-born share would stabilize at 13% and the Hispanic share would go up to 26% in 2050.

• Under a higher-immigration scenario, the total population would rise to 496 million, the foreign-born share would rise to 23% and the Hispanic share would go up to 32% in 2050.

• Under a lower- or higher-immigration scenario, the dependency ratio would range from 75 dependents per 100 people of working age to 69 dependents per 100 people of working age. Both of these ratios are well above the current value of 59 dependents per 100 people of working age.

Estimates of the Unauthorized Immigrant Population 2010 - Pew Hispanic
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Accessing of social networking sites or blogs also saw significant growth, increasing 2.6 percentage points to 20.8 percent of mobile subscribers.

Source: Pew Research Center – 2008

GOT MILK? Summer Milkshake Recipes

GOT MILK? Partners with Acclaimed BLD Pastry Chef to Share Summer Milkshake Recipes

Personality in a cup - New Hispanic flavors

Personality in a cup – New Hispanic flavors

There’s a saying that you could tell people’s personalities based on the types of drink they enjoy. A person who likes a chocolaty beverage, for example, could be described as sweet and indulgent, while someone who likes fruity drinks could be described as carefree and fun. Pastry Chef Mariah Swan of Los Angeles-based BLD & Grace Restaurants says the same could be said for those who enjoy milkshakes. Just in time for summer parties and socials, Swan and BLD have partnered with the California Milk Processor Board (CMPB), the creator of GOT MILK? to share delicious, decadent and whimsical milkshake recipes for treat-lovers to enjoy during the hot days of the season.

“Milk is not only a healthy beverage, it’s also the base for many fun drinks like milkshakes,” says Swan, a graduate of the California School of Culinary Arts and a pastry chef at BLD for two-and-a-half years. “Drinking a milkshake brings out the kid in everyone, but each flavor highlights a person’s personality.”

GOT MILK? Summer Milkshake Recipes

Available exclusively on www.gotmilk.com/recipes, Swan has created summer milkshake recipes for those who cannot resist this good old-fashioned treat. She features one-of-a-kind milkshakes in her menu, each carefully created to bring out a unique personality. They include:

1) Blueberry Malt Milkshake – blueberry, a typical summertime fruit combined with milk and vanilla ice cream for people who are jovial and who like an unexpected twist in their drink

2) Frozen Mexican Chocolate – a decadent drink blending cocoa powder, milk, cinnamon and brownies on ice for those who do not know the word “compromise”

3) Salted Caramel Milkshake – a treat consisting of milk, vanilla ice cream, caramel sauce and salt topped with whipped cream for people who consider themselves sassy and sweet

“These milkshakes are more than a treat,” says CMPB Executive Director Steve James. “They’re an absolute delight for kids of all ages. This milkshake program is one of the ways the CMPB hopes to educate consumers about the many creative ways they can incorporate milk in their diets.”

To also catch the favorite milkshake recipes of various political, entertainment and sports personalities that include San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom, Sacramento Mayor Kevin Johnson, Los Angeles City Council President Eric Garcetti, High School Musical and Dancing with the Stars Personality Monique Coleman and San Diego Padre slugger Adrian Gonzalez, please log on to www.gotmilk.com/recipes.

Source: California Milk Processor Board

Burger King enters mobile commerce full-throttle

Fast-food giant Burger King has entered the mobile commerce arena by letting consumers place orders and pay for them their iPhone. Now that’s fast food.

Restaurant locator - Burger King enters mobile commerce full-throttle

Burger King enters mobile commerce full-throttle – Restaurant locator

Burger King Mobile Restaurant Locator

Burger King teamed up with Gomobo and PointAbout for the development and design of the application. The Burger King NOW location-aware iPhone application is currently being tested in the Queens, New York, area.

“The idea of the iPhone app is to go the full nine yards with a rich mobile ordering platform,” said Noah N. Glass, founder CEO of Gomobo, New York. “This is the first case study that we have done with an iPhone application and we expect to launch these types of applications for other quick-serve restaurants we are working with.”

Gomobo helps fast-food and restaurant chains mobilize their services via mobile Web sites, and now through iPhone apps as well. Clients include Subway and Dunkin’ Donuts.

Burger King, the nation’s No. 2 burger-and-fries chain after McDonald’s Corp., has been known for its innovation with new technology, including its highly viral Subservient Chicken online viral marketing campaign earlier in the decade. Ordering and paying through the iPhone application is part of that DNA.

The iPhone’s GPS functionality lets users skip the step of entering in an address into the app. Instead it automatically finds the Burger King location closest to them.

When users place their order and come in to pick it up, they can skip the line and just grab their food, since they have paid for it via the app.

The application also tracks and saves order history and then acts as a loyalty card by offering incentives and deals.

Customize your Burger King meal

Burger King enters mobile commerce full-throttle

Burger King enters mobile commerce full-throttle

The goal behind this application is to drive incremental same-store sales – a key metric for the restaurant industry, Mr. Glass said. He also said that orders placed via the application have been 25 percent larger than in-store.

When customers start using the service, they increase their frequency of visits by 42 percent and the mobile offering takes existing loyal customers and increases their value by 75 percent.

The application is helping Burger King drive additional sales, since new customers can discover the stores near them that they may have not known about previously.

In terms of security, the application is fully secure. So, customers don’t have to worry about their credit card information being misused.

Also, the information is stored within the application, so that it doesn’t need to be re-entered each time the customer places an order.

When picking up their food, customers just need to give the last four digits of their mobile number, to confirm they are in fact the person that placed the order.

PointAbout helped Gomobo develop the application. It took the guts of the Burger King mobile site, which was developed by Gomobo, and poured it all into an iPhone experience.

Also, PointAbout made it possible for the application to remember the phone ID and allowed it to pull GPS information.

“Traditionally QSRs have focused on the four walls concept, which means doing marketing within the four walls of the restaurant,” Mr. Glass said. “They focused on what could be done in-store to make sure that patrons come back

“The mobile device allows them to extend where transactions take place and let customers make transactions from anywhere, therefore extending those four walls to the consumer’s hands,” he said. “It is also a much more efficient way of taking an order and the payment.”
Source: Mobile Marketer

Levelup.com Breaks the Alexa Top 2,000 Sites in the World

Busca Corp announced today that on Sunday July 19th Levelup.com –www.levelup.com) our flagship site and an integral part of the Busca Corp Network — has cracked Alexa’s Top 2,000 sites in the world. With over 10 million total network page views, Levelup.com has transformed into one of the top sites in Mexico and Latin America.

“The growth of Levelup.com is a testament to the 60 Billion Dollar Video Game market,” says Ramon Toledo, President of Busca Corp Media Network. “Through our partnership with Prodigy MSN we are well positioned as the #1 Video Game Site for the Latin American and U.S. Hispanic audience.”

Prodigy MSN is the most popular website in Mexico with over 23 million users and features a wide array of world-class services, such as Windows Live Hotmail, Windows Live Messenger, as well as video, news, and the latest in entertainment, lifestyle and sports. Our partnership aims to target the rapidly expanding video game user base which in the 1980’s meant mostly males under the age of 20 but today includes both male and female gamers under the age of 35.

Levelup.com publishes user-generated video game content alongside professionally produced media content that offers tips, strategies, reviews, comments and a place to share experiences with a fully engaged online community. With its unique platform, Levelup.com has experienced strong and steady growth since its launch in 2007.

Levelup.com also recently entered, and is aggressively attacking, the U.S. Hispanic Market and, is opening a largely untapped demographic with huge potential.

Source: Busca Corp

ViveMejor Summer Tips for You and Your Family!

Beauty expert Leonardo Rocco and Chef Marcela Valladolid share their secrets for summer fun on ViveMejor.com!

Summertime is finally here! Now that the kids are out of school, why arrange an expensive family getaway when you can experience a perfect day close to home? By staying close to home you can spend quality time with your loved ones, save money and discover more of your unexplored surroundings. Take full advantage of these perfect summer days with ViveMejor.com, your lifestyle resource. ViveMejor offers you tips on what to do with the family, how to prepare delicious meals that all can enjoy, and offers beauty tips so you can enjoy the summer in style!

Below are some fresh ideas to guide you on how to begin your perfect summer day with an outdoor picnic. Author, mom and Chef Marcela Valladolid offers some recipes that are delicious and affordable, so you can enjoy a fabulous lunch without breaking the bank!

1. Consider making use of your outdoor space this season and start a home garden with your family. Have each of your loved ones choose different things to plant and let your garden come alive! Take a few minutes each morning to weed and water your herbs and vegetables, so you can enjoy them for lunch or dinner once they ripen. Plant some cilantro, a popular herb in Hispanic dishes, and use it to make a Tropical Fruit Dip. This scrumptious appetizer goes wonderfully with papayas or mangoes, and is made with Hellmann’s(R) or Best Foods(R) Light Mayonnaise, providing real taste with half the fat and calories of Real Mayonnaise. Each tablespoon of this amazing dip is just $0.14(i)! By enjoying this treat while waiting for the main course you’re sure to start your lunch off right!!

2. After lunch, head to the beach, and make sure to pack plenty of beach toys to keep the kids busy. As they are enjoying their day in the sun and begin to get thirsty, give them a new and exciting drink like a Lemon Mo-tea- to, which is a great alternative to sodas! It is made with seltzer water, Lipton(R) Lemon Sugar Sweetened Iced Tea Mix and crushed mint leaves, which can also come from your very own home garden! The Lemon Mo-tea-to is quick, easy and full of flavor, so it is a summer refreshment that the whole family will love!

After spending an entire a day outside with your loved ones don’t be afraid to wind down and take some time for yourself after the kids go to bed. Take the opportunity to pamper yourself to make sure you look and feel great! With the summer humidity and rising temperatures, your beauty routine might change and hair and skin may become harder to manage. Luckily, beauty expert and celebrity stylist Leonardo Rocco is ready to share his secrets, tips and advice for looking as fabulous as ever during this season!

1. After a day in the sun, the heat and humidity can cause hair to become dry and damaged, making it harder to control. The key to gorgeous summer hair is moisturization. For salon proven performance without paying the salon price, use Suave Professionals(R) Damage Care Shampoo and Conditioner. This formula helps revitalize damaged hair, giving it a healthy-looking shine that will make other moms jealous! Try not to use blow dryers and straightening irons everyday when styling, as they will cause additional damage to your hair. Instead, try letting it air dry to show off its natural, glossy waves for a care-free look!

2. In addition to causing damage to your hair, spending a lot of time outdoors and in the sun can also wreak havoc on your skin. After cleansing your face at night make sure to keep it moisturized and healthy looking by using Pond’s(R) clarant B3. Besides serving as a great moisturizer, it is proven to even out women’s skin tone by reducing the appearance of dark spots in just 4 weeks You can always feel confident and put your best face forward while enjoying outdoor fun!

3. Finally, to avoid uncomfortable underarm wetness in your summer clothes, apply Dove Clinical Protection(R) at night before bed. Night time gives the unique prescription-strength formula time to work, building a strong level of 24-hour wetness protection that will help you feel confident while you’re out in the sun this summer!

With all these tips from Chef Marcela and Rocco, you are ready to enjoy the summer, eat well and look great while doing it, all at affordable prices! The only thing left to worry about is planning out the next exciting activity for you and your loved ones. Just make sure to enjoy the warm weather while it lasts!

For even more recipes, beauty tips, and money-saving coupons, don’t forget to visit www.ViveMejor.com!

(i) Based on average retail prices at national supermarkets.

About Unilever

Unilever’s mission is to add vitality to life. We meet everyday needs for nutrition, hygiene and personal care with brands that help people feel good, look good and get more out of life. Each day, around the world, consumers make 160 million decisions to purchase Unilever products.

In the United States, the portfolio includes major brand icons such as: Axe, Ben & Jerry’s, Bertolli, Breyers, Caress, Country Crock, Degree, Dove personal care products, Hellmann’s, Klondike, Knorr, Lipton, Popsicle, Promise, Q-Tips, Skippy, Slim-Fast, Suave, Sunsilk and Vaseline. All of the preceding brand names are registered trademarks of the Unilever Group of Companies. Dedicated to serving consumers and the communities where we live, work and play, Unilever employs nearly 12,000 people in both the United States and Puerto Rico — generating nearly $10 billion in sales in 2008. For more information, visit www.unileverusa.com.
Source: ViveMejor.com

What will the U.S. look like in 2050?

U.S. Population Projections: 2005–2050 - What will the U.S. look like in 2050?

U.S. Population Projections: 2005–2050 – What will the U.S. look like in 2050?

U.S. Population Projections: 2005–2050

What will the U.S. look like in 2050? Population and Immigration

Between 2005 and 2050, the nation’s population will increase to 438 million from 296 million, a rise of 142 million people that represents growth of 48%.

Immigrants who arrive after 2005, and their U.S.-born descendants, account for 82% of the projected national population increase during the 2005–2050 period.

Of  the 117 additional people attributable to the effect of new immigration, 67 million will be the immigrants themselves and 50 million will be their U.S.-born children and grandchildren

The nation’s foreign-born population, 36 million in 2005, is projected to rise to 81 million in 2050, growth of 129%.

In 2050, nearly one in five Americans (19%) will be an immigrant, compared with one in eight now (12% in 2005).

• The foreign-born share of the nation’s population will exceed historic highs sometime between 2020 and 2025, when it reaches 15%. The historic peak share was 14.7% in 1910 and 14.8% in 1890.

• Births in the United States will play a growing role in Hispanic and Asian population growth, so a diminishing proportion of both groups will be foreign-born.

What will the U.S. look like in 2050? Racial and Ethnic Groups

• The Hispanic population, 42 million in 2005, will rise to 128 million in 2050, tripling in size. Latinos will be 29% of the population, compared with 14% in 2005. Latinos will account for 60% of the nation’s population growth from 2005 to 2050.

• The black population, 38 million in 2005, will grow to 59 million in 2050, a rise of 56%. In 2050, the nation’s population will be 13.4% black, compared with 12.8% in 2005.

• The Asian population, 14 million in 2005, will grow to 41 million in 2050, nearly tripling in size. In 2050, the nation’s population will be 9% Asian, compared with 5% in 2005. Most Asians in the United States were foreign born in 2005 (58%), but by 2050, fewer than half (47%) will be.

• The white, non-Hispanic population, 199 million in 2005, will grow to 207 million in 2050, a 4% increase. In 2050, 47% of the U.S. population will be non-Hispanic white, compared with 67% in 2005.

What will the U.S. look like in 2050? Age Groups

• The working-age population—adults ages 18 to 64—will reach 255 million in 2050, up from 186 million in 2005. This segment will grow more slowly over the projection period (37%) than the overall population. Future immigrants and their descendants will account for all growth in this group.

• Among working-age adults, the foreign-born share, 15% in 2005, will rise to 23% in 2050. The Hispanic share, 14% in 2005, will increase to 31% in 2050. The non-Hispanic white share, 68% in 2005, will decline to 45% in 2050.

• The nation’s population of children ages 17 and younger will rise to 102 million in 2050, up from 73 million in 2005. The child population will grow more slowly in future decades (39%) than will the overall population. Future immigrants and their descendants will account for all growth in this population segment.

• Among children, the share who are immigrants or who have an immigrant parent will rise to 34% in 2050 from 23% in 2005. The share of children who are Hispanic, 20% in 2005, will rise to 35% in 2050. Non-Hispanic whites, who make up 59% of today’s children, will be 40% of children in 2050.

• The nation’s elderly population— people ages 65 and older—will grow to 81 million in 2050, up from 37 million in 2005. This group will grow more rapidly than the overall population, so its share will increase to 19% in 2050, from 12% in 2005. Immigration will account for only a small part of that growth.

• The dependency ratio—the number of people of working age, compared with the number of young and elderly—will rise sharply, mainly because of growth in the elderly population. There were 59 children and elderly people per 100 adults of working age in 2005. That will rise to 72 dependents per 100 adults of working age in 2050.

What will the U.S. look like in 2050? Alternative Projection Scenarios

• Under a lower-immigration scenario, the total population would rise to 384 million, the foreign-born share would stabilize at 13% and the Hispanic share would go up to 26% in 2050.

• Under a higher-immigration scenario, the total population would rise to 496 million, the foreign-born share would rise to 23% and the Hispanic share would go up to 32% in 2050.

• Under a lower- or higher-immigration scenario, the dependency ratio would range from 75 dependents per 100 people of working age to 69 dependents per 100 people of working age. Both of these ratios are well above the current value of 59 dependents per 100 people of working age.

Estimates of the Unauthorized Immigrant Population 2010 - Pew Hispanic
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Accessing of social networking sites or blogs also saw significant growth, increasing 2.6 percentage points to 20.8 percent of mobile subscribers.

Source: Pew Research Center – 2008

Hispanic girls face many obstacles to playing sports

Rosa Mendez and her mother share the same first name. In Spanish, it means “pink,” which also happens to be Rosa’s favorite color. She certainly plays it up. She pierced both ears with pink diamonds, she drives around with a pink Rosary hanging from her rearview mirror and she color-coordinates pink Nikes with her school clothes.

Hispanic women and Sports - Soccer or football

Hispanic women and Sports – Soccer or football

But hidden underneath all that girly-ness, her favorite sport — soccer — often leaves her body black and blue with bruises.

She would get so lost in playing the game she loves during her spring season at East High School in Kansas City that sometimes she had no idea how she got so beat up.

Soccer is Rosa’s passion. Or futbol, as it is called in the Mendez living room. In her home, as is the case in many traditional Latino families, futbol isn’t a sport played by girls named after delicate flowers.

“It was my idea to go play,” Rosa says, “but (my parents) would say, ‘Stay here with the kids.’ Because girls shouldn’t be playing aggressive things.”

Rosa is the daughter of a Mexican father who works 12 hours a day and a Nicaraguan mother who works on an assembly line packing boxes with bottles of salad dressing and seasoning salt. She recently completed her junior season — her first high school soccer season — as a goalkeeper for the East Bears varsity team. Largely made up of Latinas (girls of Latin-American or Spanish-speaking descent), East’s roster is similar to those at several other inner-city schools, including Renaissance Academy, Alta Vista Charter High School, Northeast and Harmon, a Kansas City, Kan., high school with a Latino student population of 54 percent.

These are daughters of northern Mexican immigrants, the first or second generation that has come here to build new lives. But while adapting to old-age American traditions, like playing for the home team, these teenage girls sometimes struggle to navigate between their own desire to compete and their family’s cultural customs.

“In the Hispanic community, girls are more likely to do something that we call ‘girly’ or art stuff,” says Antonia Saenz, whose daughter Vanessa played soccer for the Alta Vista Lady Aztecs. “Sports are mostly seen for guys. It’s aggressive. Girls are not looked upon to be strong physically. They’re actually not encouraged to.”

This isn’t simply machismo. Many community leaders suggest there are practical reasons why Latina girls are expected to stay home. Their parents may often work long hours for little pay and live in some of the poorest communities in the city. When a daughter becomes old enough, she is asked to help with the younger siblings in the house or take on a part-time job. So who really has time to play soccer when the family needs the help?

“A couple of girls miss practices because they need to baby-sit,” East co-head coach Mike Somodi says. “It’s unbelievable the things that have priorities. It’s hard to get them in the mode of thinking that (soccer) is important. They want to play…but a lot of them work.”

•••

Rosa gets more than her name from her mother. Her flowing brown hair and a smile that radiates her otherwise sad eyes, she believes, she gets from her mother as well.

“We really get along,” Rosa says. “She knows everything about me.”

But Mrs. Mendez doesn’t always understand this daughter of hers.

She’s perplexed about why Rosa is so faithful to soccer practice and to a team that didn’t win many games. She wonders why Rosa can’t stay home with her three younger siblings.

Hispanic women and Sports - Soccer or football

Hispanic women and Sports – Soccer or football

Instead of coming home after school this spring, Rosa spent five days out of the week with her East Bears. At practice, Rosa would split time barking commands and encouragements, then sacrificing her thin, 5-foot-6 1/2 -inch frame in front of a net while teammates practiced shots.

Midway through the spring season, the Bears’ starting goalkeeper — Zenadia Mendez, Rosa’s older sister — quit the team. East tried to fill the position with another player, and then Rosa got her opportunity during one game when the Bears fell behind 7-0.

“That was my first time ever, and that’s how we finished, trailing 7-0. I didn’t let anything by,” Rosa says proudly. “Nobody wanted to be goalie, so I didn’t want to pressure them to be in it. But then I got to liking it . . . I felt like I was making a difference.”

Yes, Rosa’s a tough one — and everyone on that soccer field knows it.

“During a tournament at Camdenton, she took three shots to her face,” Somodi says. “Knocked her down, but she got back up.”

Mama Mendez doesn’t exactly like her daughter getting slugged in the chops, especially in a losing effort. East lost that tournament game 2-1, by the way.

As she sits in her living room, Rosa’s mother expresses her opinions about her daughter in clear but unconfident English. “I think,” Mendez says slowly, then turns to Rosa for help in finding the right phrase. Rosa listens to her mother, who never sugarcoats her words, and interprets: “I give a lot, but I receive less.”

Rosa’s mother continues, and she needs no help to say…

“She tries very hard, she asks for shoes, she asks for permission to go to practice,” Rosa’s mother says. “And all she gets is bruises. She gets hurt sometimes. She gets frustrated. I’ve been to a couple of games and she lost, so I said, ‘It’s not worth it.’ You get hurt and you lose. Her dad, he feels the same way. But she says: ‘I like it.’ ”

•••

Rosa loves soccer because the game is her escape.

She loves her No. 4 jersey, washing it after every game and delicately hang-drying it for fear that the machine won’t get the wrinkles out just right. She loves being around her teammates, in the back of the bus, cracking jokes on the way to a game. She’d do anything for those girls and one day hopes to get matching soccer tattoos with teammate Brandi Roos.

She caught the soccer passion at a young age. When she wasn’t watching Mexican League games on the living room television, she was tagging along to Sheffield Park to watch her father, Arturo, play goalie on a team made up of friends and family. She remembers watching her father and thinking: I want to play, too.

Now that she’s playing again for the first time in three years, Rosa can’t decide whether it’s the game she loves so much or just the freedom it gives her.

She used to play all the time, in the streets and for a James Elementary school team.

“When in elementary school,” Rosa’s mother says, “she wanted to play and I let her play. I did.”

But as Rosa got older, she took on more responsibilities at home. It is this very role — burgeoning homemaker — that community member Raquel Daldalian has found common among young Latinas. Daldalian points out that not all Latino families can be lumped together, but in her talks with a group of Hispanic girls from Northeast High School, their stories are all too common.

“Generally, the girls in a Latino family are expected to know how to cook and clean; that’s their main objectives,” says Daldalian, a Project Safe Prevention specialist at the Rose Brooks Center. “They are told if they don’t do these things, they won’t find a man. They’re not expected to go to school, and sports are at the bottom of the barrel.”

In Nicaragua, Mendez did not play organized sports, but she enjoyed active days as a little girl. Mendez grew up playing made-up games around her neighborhood that constituted a lot of running and chasing. She smiles when recalling those days, when she was just a girl and the focus of her life was games the neighborhood kids would dream up.

But when her mother moved the family to America, Mendez had to put away her childhood.

Rosa will be 17 soon and, like most typical teenage girls, she cherishes her cell phone and boyfriend. At 17, her mother was working eight-hour days packing tomatoes in Kansas City, Kan.

These days, Rosa is looking forward to her senior year. But at that same age, Rosa’s mother already was a high school dropout. There was no escape with soccer, as there is now for her daughter.

“It wasn’t a sacrifice,” Rosa’s mother says of her five-day-a-week work schedule. “I just had to help my mom.”

She met Arturo Mendez in 1989, and the couple married six months later. They’re raising their six children in the same three-bedroom house on Wheeling Avenue that they’ve lived in since starting a family. Both Mom and Dad want to see their children leave this place and surpass them.

Mrs. Mendez has a simple goal for Rosa — stay in school.

“My husband and I never got to finish school,” Mendez says. “We know how hard it is. …Our jobs depend on how strong we are. Not how smart we are.”

Although Mendez wants the best for her daughter, she is hesitant to follow Rosa’s passion for soccer.

“Sometimes,” Mendez sighs. “I don’t understand.

“If she likes playing soccer and (can) handle school and sports, it’s all right. (But) in my country, I’ve never seen girls in sports. To be honest, I’ve never seen girls with a medal.”

•••

The lack of importance associated with organized sports is evident in the Latinas who do play. Their families often cannot afford to send their children to youth leagues that would develop their skills. As a result, varsity soccer at schools like East and Alta Vista can be a rough sketch of what the game is actually supposed to look like.

Alta Vista coach Greg Brenner, a Mexican American, took over the varsity squad this spring and inherited 17 Latinas. Many of them did not know how to properly kick a soccer ball.

“I saw them play, and they looked like they were playing in slow motion,” Brenner says. “I kind of expected that, ‘Hey, you’re Hispanic. Aren’t you born with a soccer ball attached to you?’ But I worked with a boys team and saw the same thing. Socioeconomics come in … they don’t have time or money to play soccer.”

The reality for Rosa Mendez is that she has better things to be doing right now. She could use the money from her part-time job at Wendy’s to offset some of the expenses of her upcoming senior year. And on her off days, she could find herself watching her three younger siblings run around the house during summer vacation. But she wants to keep playing soccer.

She’s found a street team named Hidalgo and minds the net this summer. When Rosa recently asked her mother whether she could play, this time ¿Por que? (Why?) was not the response.

Her parents have come to understand why Rosa wants to play this game. Even as she struggles to explain the love herself.

“I’m not sure if it’s because of my dad or just the feeling of the game — when you make a goal or when you have the ball and you’re taking it up the field. I don’t know if it’s just being out or, ya know, it’s soccer,” Rosa says. “Everything about soccer. Working as a team. Even in goal, just slapping the ball…it’s probably the adrenaline. Everything.”

Source: Candace Buckner – The Kansas City Star

Hispanic children are getting most nutrients, but eating too much fat

The Hispanic community has its own set of health challenges, including high rates of diabetes, plus kidney and cardiovascular disease. Children aren’t immune — according to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, from 2005 through 2006 Mexican American children age 2 through 19 were the heaviest among all ethnic and racial groups in the U.S.

Los Angeles Times – Hispanic Children – Health

Just how their diets break down is the subject of a study in the June issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Assn., which analyzed the nutrition quality in diets of 1,030 normal weight and overweight Hispanic children age 4 to 19 in Houston who had low socioeconomic status. Quality was assessed using the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, published jointly by the Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Agriculture.

Overall, the diets of all children were adequate in most nutrients, but often surpassed the guidelines for total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, and added sugar and salt. Looking more closely at the foods the kids ate, 68% of calories came primarily from soda, desserts, pizza, chips, fruit drinks, fruit juice, processed meats and burgers. About one-fourth of the children went over the maximum intake level of 25% for added sugars.

All kids came up short on fruits and vegetables — the average number of servings they ate was lower than the Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommendation. They also fell below standards on consumption of vitamins E and D, pantothenic acid, calcium, potassium and fiber.

Several factors put the Hispanic population at higher risk for obesity. In this study, 91% of parents were overweight or obese, and parents’ income and education levels were low. Other issues reported in the NHANES study include limited health insurance coverage, acculturation to American diet and lifestyle, recent immigration, and access to medical care.

Researchers from the Baylor College of Medicine wrote in this study: “Knowledge of the dietary intake of children from low-[socioeconomic status] Hispanic families at high risk for obesity will provide a basis on which to build nutritional interventions and policy that are appropriately tailored to population subgroups.”

 

Love this quote. Move on!

Love this quote. Move on!

Source: Los Angeles Times – Health
By Jeannine Stein
Photo credit: Francis Specker / AP

School taking steps to fight swine flu

Associated Press

10:40 AM CDT, April 27, 2009

CHICAGO – Concern about a deadly strain of swine flu has prompted one Chicago school in a largely Hispanic neighborhood to forbid students from shaking hands.

Orozco Community Academy Principal Coralia Barraza also says when parents call to say their children are home sick, school officials are being told to ask more questions about the illness than they typically do.

Barraza says the school in Chicago’s Pilsen neighborhood is being particularly vigilant because it has a lot of Hispanic children and routinely enrolls students who’ve just arrived from Mexico — including one just last week.
She also says students travel with their families to and from Mexico.

An Ad that connects with the U.S. Hispanic Consumer

by Claudia Havi Goffan

Hispanic Advertising is about connecting with the U.S. Hispanic Consumer and their real-life experiences and, sometimes, it is simpler than imagined. Learn how Oreo reached the Hispanic Consumer with this outstanding campaign.

In my everyday life, I pay attention to advertisements—I simply love them. No matter where they are—TV, magazines, newspapers and even billboards—I can’t get enough of them. The one exception is Internet ads. They have to be extraordinary to capture my attention as a marketer. Companies are just simply not investing enough creativity on them yet. As a Hispanic marketer and a Latino woman, my heart melts when I realize a company has made “the” total connection with the Hispanic consumer. A great example is this magazine ad that Nabisco produced for its Oreo brand.

It features a dad, a child, an Oreo cookie with the caption: “Dad learns to eat Oreos from me.”

This Oreo Print Ad speaks to the Hispanic market acculturation experience

This Oreo Print Ad speaks to the Hispanic market acculturation experience

Hispanic children, either born in the U.S. or abroad, are exposed to many experiences that their non- or semi-acculturated parents may never experience, unless it’s through them. So, how do you think a Hispanic dad will learn to eat an Oreo the American way?

That’s why this ad works. There are no stereotypes. There is only a human truth.

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Quote of the Day

Absolutely love reading this quote. I never get tired of it. Apple Ad great words

Apple Ad great words