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First Latino Pope Francis I: History in the making

Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Argentina was elected pope today, becoming the first pontiff from Latin America and taking the name Pope Francis.

The white smoke, accompanied by the pealing of bells to eliminate any confusion, billowed from a flue on the roof of the Sistine Chapel, prompting the huge gathered in the square to erupt in applause and cheers.

Pope Francis I - Papa Francisco PrimeroPope Francis becomes the first pope to hail from outside of Europe. He is also the first Hispanic Pope and the first Latin American Pope as well as the first Argentinean Pope. Latin America is one of the biggest bastions of Catholicism in the world but more bets were being placed on the Cardinal from Brazil.

Pope Francis I (Papa Francisco Primero) appeared on the balcony of St. Peter’s Basilica after the pronouncement ‘Habemus Papam’ – “We have a pope.”  He spoke in Latin, Italian and in Spanish.

This pope is the 266th successor Pope to the Catholic churches original apostle St. Peter.  White smoke appeared at 7.:05 p.m. local Vatican time indicating 115 cardinals had been made after five rounds of cloistered voting.

Argentina’s President Cristina Fernandez called his thinking harkened back to “medieval times and the Inquisition.”

Personally, what resonated with me the most was when he said: “Let’s pray for the whole world because it is a great brotherhood.”

Pope Francis

Pope Francis

Hispanic Acculturation Process
body language meaning in Colombia
quotes motivation hope

quotes motivation hope

Next Quote? funny inspirational quotes on every post! | Support of Comprehensive Immigration Reform: ASPIRA Applauds Verizon for Courageous Stand

First Latino Pope Francis I: History in the making

Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Argentina was elected pope today, becoming the first pontiff from Latin America and taking the name Pope Francis.

The white smoke, accompanied by the pealing of bells to eliminate any confusion, billowed from a flue on the roof of the Sistine Chapel, prompting the huge gathered in the square to erupt in applause and cheers.

Pope Francis I - Papa Francisco PrimeroPope Francis becomes the first pope to hail from outside of Europe. He is also the first Hispanic Pope and the first Latin American Pope as well as the first Argentinean Pope. Latin America is one of the biggest bastions of Catholicism in the world but more bets were being placed on the Cardinal from Brazil.

Pope Francis I (Papa Francisco Primero) appeared on the balcony of St. Peter’s Basilica after the pronouncement ‘Habemus Papam’ – “We have a pope.”  He spoke in Latin, Italian and in Spanish.

This pope is the 266th successor Pope to the Catholic churches original apostle St. Peter.  White smoke appeared at 7.:05 p.m. local Vatican time indicating 115 cardinals had been made after five rounds of cloistered voting.

Argentina’s President Cristina Fernandez called his thinking harkened back to “medieval times and the Inquisition.”

Personally, what resonated with me the most was when he said: “Let’s pray for the whole world because it is a great brotherhood.”

Pope Francis

Pope Francis

Hispanic Acculturation Process
body language meaning in Colombia
quotes motivation hope

quotes motivation hope

Next Quote? funny inspirational quotes on every post! | Support of Comprehensive Immigration Reform: ASPIRA Applauds Verizon for Courageous Stand

Telemundo President to address Latino business and community leaders at HACR symposium

Telemundo, a leading producer of high-quality content for Hispanics in the U.S. and audiences around the world, has announced that its President, Don Browne, will address business and corporate leaders on May 18th in San Francisco at the 18th Annual Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility (HACR) Symposium.  Browne will join the HACR CEO Roundtable hosted by John Stumpf, Chairman and CEO of Wells Fargo & Company and participant Stephen Holmes, Chairman & CEO of Wyndham Worldwide.

The 18th Annual HACR Symposium: The Power of Hispanic Inclusion brings together some of the nation’s most influential Hispanic leaders, government officials and corporate executives to discuss and identify effective strategies and models for achieving greater Hispanic inclusion and participation in the areas of employment, procurement, philanthropy and governance.

“Commitment. Innovation. Leadership. These are words that describe Don Browne’s passion for the Hispanic community and we are very pleased to have Don join us at this year’s HACR CEO Roundtable,” stated Carlos Orta, HACR’s President/CEO.

This past April, Browne celebrated five years at the helm of Telemundo having led the company to the most diverse Hispanic leadership in its history: Telemundo’s leadership team grew from 33% Hispanic in 2002 to 85% Hispanic in 2010.  Today, approximately 85% of Telemundo’s full-time employees are Hispanic.

Browne also led Telemundo’s evolution from a simple broadcaster of acquired content to a leader in producing original content specifically for U.S. Hispanics – made by Hispanics, for Hispanics – delivering today more than 3,000 hours of original content a year. Under his leadership, Telemundo invested millions of dollars to create Telemundo Studios and build an entire industry for the future, providing hundreds of jobs to talented Hispanics and developing talent on and off the screen. Telemundo has evolved into a multimedia company by creating businesses across all platforms that did not exist before, including a rapidly growing Digital business and a world-renowned International operation that distributes content to more than 100 countries in over 30 languages, promoting U.S. locations and the work of Hispanics to the entire world.

A longtime advocate of expanding into the Spanish-language television market, Browne was a key member of the NBC team involved in the purchase of the Telemundo network. Browne has a national reputation for being especially active in the recruitment and career development of women and minorities. He is co-founder and board member of the “Women of Tomorrow Mentor and Scholarship Program” for at- risk high school girls. He is the recipient of the 2006 Florida Governor’s Points of Light Award for exemplary service to his community and the 2004 prestigious Ida B. Wells Award for his commitment to promoting diversity in the work place.

In 2008, Browne’s extensive contributions to the broadcasting industry and Spanish-language television were recognized by Broadcasting & Cable, where he was inducted into the prestigious Broadcasting & Cable Hall of Fame, an industry honor that is bestowed on the pioneers, the innovators and the stars of the electronic arts.

Led by Browne, Telemundo recently reaffirmed its commitment to news by introducing a comprehensive news strategy to enhance and expand its news content across key day parts and multiple platforms including increased investment in local newscasts at the Telemundo stations and the launch of the weekly public affairs show Enfoque.

Thanks to Browne’s commitment to the Hispanic community, the network has been a pioneer in integrating social issues in its prime time original novelas including topics such as the 2010 Census, Latino women self esteem, immigration, health, workplace safety, domestic violence, literacy, eating disorders, rape, and plastic surgery, among many others.

In order to implement its multiple pro social initiatives including voter registration, Latina women, the 2010 Census, and many other causes, Telemundo regularly partners with leading U.S. Hispanic organizations including USHLI, LULAC, NHMC, USHCC, CNC, HACR, CHLI, NAHJ, NCLR, CHCI, NPRC, NiLP and MANA.

About Telemundo

Telemundo Communications Group (“Telemundo”), a division of NBC Universal, is a world-class media company, leading the industry in the production and distribution of high-quality Spanish-language content across its multiplatform portfolio to U.S. Hispanics and audiences around the world. Telemundo’s multiple platforms include Telemundo, a Spanish-language television network featuring original productions, theatrical motion pictures, news and first-class sports events reaching 93% of U.S. Hispanic viewers in 210 markets through its 15 owned-and-operated stations, 45 broadcast affiliates, and 800 cable affiliates; mun2, the preeminent voice for bicultural Hispanics in the U.S. reaching over 34.1 million U.S. TV households nationwide on digital and analog cable, and satellite television; Telemundo Digital Media, which leverages Telemundo’s original content for distribution across digital and emerging platforms including mobile devices and www.telemundo.com and www.holamun2.com ; and Telemundo International, the company’s international distribution arm which has positioned Telemundo as the second largest provider of Spanish-language content worldwide by syndicating content to more than 100 countries in over 35 languages.

CONTACT:
Michelle Alban
Telemundo
Vice President, Corporate Communications & Public Affairs
305-889-7585
Michelle.alban@nbcuni.com

Kids of Spanish-speaking Hispanic moms watch less TV

When it comes to a kid’s television-viewing habits, the mom’s language can matter.

When it comes to a kid's television-viewing habits, the mom's language can matter.

When it comes to a kid’s television-viewing habits, the mom’s language can matter.

Researchers at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine surveyed 1,347 women who had children ages 35 months to 4 years to assess just how much time the kids spent in front on the tube. They knew that young children of white mothers and young children of Hispanic mothers watched similar amounts of TV (we’ll go out on a limb here and say “too much”), but they seemed to think there might be some variables to be explored within those numbers and perhaps, down the road, interventions to be found.

They were right on the former. The latter remains to be seen. The researchers found that kids of English-speaking Hispanic moms and kids of Spanish-speaking Hispanic moms watched about the same amount of TV during their first year (yes, yes, infants watching any TV…). But by the second and third years, children of the English-speaking moms watched more, a lot more.

The abstract was published online Monday in the February issue of Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Maybe TV simply is less important to Spanish-speaking Hispanic moms, the researchers speculated, or maybe there are fewer Spanish-language shows for toddlers.

Regardless, they conclude: “These findings highlight the need to further understand sociocultural factors that influence television viewing habits in young Hispanic children. Interventionists should consider such factors when designing interventions targeting television viewing in young Hispanic children. Additionally, these findings emphasize the need for researchers to appreciate the heterogeneity of the Hispanic population when describing health behaviors and outcomes in this population.”

And if you’re wondering why this is relevant, the researchers point out in the study’s introduction: “Excessive television viewing in early childhood is associated with a multitude of negative health outcomes, including obesity, attention problems, and sleep troubles. … Additionally, Hispanic children face disparities in many health outcomes,18 some of which may be associated with early television habits.”

Source: Tami Dennis, Los Angeles Times – Orlando Sentinel

Inside Hispanic America

by Claudia “Havi” Goffan

Winner of the Publisher’s Multicultural Award Category: Best Multicultural Awareness Article

What is life like in America for Hispanic Americans?  What are their thoughts and concerns about family, employment, education, religion, opportunities, and healthcare?  We asked Claudia Goffan, founder of Target Latino, an Atlanta based marketing and consulting firm specializing in the Hispanic market, to provide “The College World Reporter” readers with her own views from inside Hispanic America. Here is our interview:

Claudia "Havi" Goffan - Hispanic Marketing Expert and CEO of Target Latino

Claudia “Havi” Goffan – Hispanic Marketing Expert and CEO of Target Latino

Q.Could you give us an inside look at Hispanic or Latino life?

A. To fully understand the Hispanic market, you need to analyze it by country of origin, level of acculturation, age, sex, marital status and educational level. Although some generalizations can be made, they have to be understood as such and not as an answer to comprehending the culture.

Let’s talk about some of the generalizations about the Hispanic culture. The very first one that comes to mind is about family being the first priority, the children are celebrated and sheltered and the wife usually fulfills a domestic role. Hispanics have a long Roman Catholic tradition and this usually implies quite a fatalistic outlook where destiny is in the hands of God. Latin American educational system is based on emphasis on the theoretical, memorization and a rigid and very broad curriculum. It follows the French schooling system and it translates into people who are generalists and look at the big picture as opposed to specialists, like in the U.S. Hispanics are highly nationalistic, very proud of long history and traditions.

Hispanics have difficulty separating work and personal relationships and are sensitive to differences of opinion. Hispanics fear loss of face, especially publicly and shun confrontation, where truth is tempered by the need for diplomacy. Title and position are more important than money in the eyes of Hispanic society. Etiquette and manners are seen as a measure of breeding and it follows an “old world” formality. Dress and grooming are status symbols whereas in the U.S. appearance is secondary to performance. The aesthetic side of life is important even at work.

Q. Tell us about the purchasing power of the U.S. Hispanics?

A. According to the University of Georgia’s Selig Center for Economic Growth in 2004 the nation’s largest minority group controlled $686 billion in spending. The community’s purchasing power comprises the world’s ninth biggest economy and it’s larger than the GNP of Brazil, Spain or Mexico. Hispanic purchasing power is projected to reach as much as $1 trillion by next year (2010) being the main drivers of the surge in Hispanic consumer influence the increasing education levels, labor force composition, household characteristics and accumulation of wealth. The fastest-growing occupational categories for Hispanics are higher paying managerial and professional jobs.

Q. What about Hispanics’ Healthcare Access?

A. I will quote a new analysis by the Pew Hispanic Center that indicates that six-in-ten Hispanic adults living in the United States who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents lack health insurance. According to this same study, the share of uninsured among this group (60%) is much higher than the share of uninsured among Latino adults who are legal permanent residents or citizens (28%), or among the adult population of the United States (17%). Hispanic adults who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents tend to be younger and healthier than the adult U.S. population and are less likely than other groups to have a regular health care provider. Just 57% say there is a place they usually go when they are sick or need advice about their health, compared with 76% of Latino adults who are citizens or legal permanent residents and 83% of the adult U.S. population.

Overall, four-in-ten (41%) non-citizen, non-legal permanent resident Hispanics state that their usual provider is a community clinic or health center. These centers are designed primarily as “safety nets” for vulnerable populations and are funded by a variety of sources, including the federal government, state governments and private foundations, as well as reimbursements from patients, based upon a sliding scale (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2008).

Six out of 10 Hispanics are U.S.-born - Inside Hispanic America

Six out of 10 Hispanics are U.S.-born – Inside Hispanic America

The study also reports that some 37% of Latino adults who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents have no usual health care provider. More than one-fourth (28%) of the people in this group indicate that financial limitations prevent them from having a usual provider – 17% report that their lack of insurance is the primary reason, while 12% cite high medical costs in general. However, a majority (56%) say they do not have a usual provider because they simply do not need one. An additional 5% state that difficulty in navigating the U.S. health care system prevents them from having a usual provider. According to Pew Hispanic Center estimates, 11.9 million undocumented immigrants were living in the U.S. in 2008. Three-quarters (76%) of these undocumented immigrants were Latinos.

Regarding health status, the study reports that the Latino population in the U.S. is relatively young, and Latino adults who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents are younger still. Some 43% of adult Latinos who are not citizens or legal permanent residents are younger than age 30, compared with 27% of Hispanic adults who are citizens or legal permanent residents and 22% of the adult U.S. population.  The youthfulness of this population contributes to its relative healthiness.

About the Hispanic experiences in the Health Care System, the Pew reports that three-fourths (76%) of Latino adults who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents report that the quality of medical care they received in the past year was excellent or good. This is similar to the proportion of adult Latino citizens and legal permanent residents (78%) who express satisfaction with their recent health care. However, when asked a separate question – whether they had received any poor medical treatment in the past five years – adult Latinos who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents are less likely (16%) to report any problems than are Latinos who are citizens or legal permanent residents (24%).

Among those Latinos who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents who report receiving poor medical treatment in the past five years, a plurality (46%) state that they believed their accent or the way they spoke English contributed to that poor care. A similar share (43%) believed that their inability to pay for care contributed to their poor treatment. More than one-third (37%) felt that their race or ethnicity played a part in their poor care, and one-fourth (25%) attributed the unsatisfactory treatment to something in their medical history.

Q. What is the difference in viewpoint between young Hispanics or Latinos born and raised in the United States, and their older parents or grandparents who migrated to the U.S. from other countries?

A. The one difference that applies to all Latinos existent between non and semi-acculturated Hispanics and fully-acculturated or U.S. born Hispanics (young or old) is that whereas the non and semi-acculturated Latinos are trying to learn how to navigate the American culture, the U.S. born Hispanics or fully-acculturated know how to navigate the American culture and “learn” to navigate the Hispanic one from their family.

Q. Who are people on the rise in the Hispanic or Latino community that may become corporate leaders, or the next Sonia Sotomayor?

A. There are many Hispanics on the rise in every walk of life in the United States. Some people may not even notice of their Hispanic background because it usually comes to light when there are political issues at stake. For example, a currently retired doctor that was the Director of Cardiology of the St. Joseph’s Hospital in Atlanta was originally from Argentina. The creative that many years ago came up with the successful campaign for a drug that put the country to sleep is a Nuyorican (Puerto Rican born in New York).

Regarding known Latinos on the rise, you may want to keep an eye on Christine Arguello, Judge, U.S. District Court, Colorado; Emiliano Calemzuk, President, Fox Television Studios; Ignacia Moreno, Counsel, Corporate Environmental Programs, General Electric Company; Esther Salas, U.S. Magistrate Judge, District of New Jersey; Thomas Saenz, President and General Counsel, Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund (MALDEF); Hilda Solis, Secretary of Labor; Rosa Gumatatotao Rios, United States Treasurer; Elena Rios, President & CEO, National Hispanic Medical Foundation; Enrique Conterno; President, Eli Lilly, USA and Edward Chavez, Justice, the State of New Mexico Supreme Court, among many others.

Q. What should everyone know about Hispanics or Latinos?

A. The first thing that comes to mind is the very little known fact that 6 out of 10 Latinos are U.S. born.  The second one is that the younger the generation, the higher the percentage of Hispanics in it. It is imperative to understand the new U.S. demographics when developing business strategies, city planning, new products, etc.

About Claudia Goffan: Recognized as an expert in Latino Marketing by CNN en Español, Claudia has been featured in Adweek, Hispanic Business, Univision, Telemundo and other national and international media.

A native from Buenos Aires, Argentina, Claudia has been very influential in the Hispanic markets in the U.S. and Latin America – both from a business and a community standpoint – always with outstanding results. Claudia has contributed to companies such as, The Occasions Group, The Taylor Corporation, El Banco de Nuestra Comunidad (A division of SunTrust Bank), XEROX, AT&T, BellSouth, Citibank, Papa John’s, Liberty Mutual, British Telecom, Gold’s Gym, Sherwin Williams, and Verizon, among others.

A motivator, strategic and hands-on, innovative, creative and resourceful. It has been said that her humor and presence immediately captivate audiences. She has an MBA from the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina and from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), and more than 20 years specializing in Marketing and Strategic Planning both internationally and domestically. She is bilingual and bicultural in English and Spanish and fluent in Portuguese, French, and Italian.

About Target Latino: Target Latino was founded in 2003, with a vision unparalleled at the time – to show American companies the importance of the U.S. Hispanic market – not by preaching but by acting. Target Latino is a marketing consulting firm specializing in the Hispanic market and inbound strategies.  Target Latino has a long standing experience of driving results in tough economic times.  Target Latino is minority owned, and a percentage of its proceeds go to different charity causes.

So true. Great Quotes

Great quote

SABEResPODER & Best Buy Promote Informed Shopping Decisions

The initiative aims at educating the Latino community on how best to take advantage of the technology at their reach.

Best Buy unites with SABEResPODER to educate the Hispanic community about how to get the most out of the latest technology and understand their rights as consumers.

Various studies show that Latinos purchase more televisions, digital cameras, cell phones, and computers than the average population. However, Raul P. Lomeli-Azoubel, Executive Chairman for SABEResPODER, said that, “the statistics also reveal a different reality: the technological advances, that serve to make our lives easier, are not being used to their full potential.”

For this reason, SABEResPODER, with Best Buy’s support, has published an educational guide about “New Technologies” with the main objective of sharing vital information, so that consumers can learn more about their options.

The educational campaign also includes an informative video on the subject and workshops that will be offered to community groups. The goal of the initiative is to promote smarter, more informed, consumer electronic shopping, and help the community purchase products that actually meet their specific needs.

“Our knowledgeable, non-commission sales specialists are trained specifically to help our customers find the right product solution to best fit their individual needs,” says Marco Orozco from Best Buy. “We believe our sales specialists’ primary role is to listen to the needs of our customers and then inform and educate them on their product options.”

The initiative was presented during a community event at the Mexican Consulate in Los Angeles, where Consul General Juan Marcos Gutierrez congratulated SABEResPODER for this campaign focused on educating the community and empowering them to make informed purchasing decisions. The Consul General also made the following recommendation to the audience: “remember to first educate yourself on your options in order to avoid mistakes that are caused by impulse shopping.”

The recurring theme at the event was for consumers to make informed purchases to ensure that technology delivers on its promises; and to learn how technology can improve the quality of life in a digital world.

About SABEResPODER, Inc.

SABEResPODER provides corporations, agencies and non-profit entities with powerful and exclusive educational media solutions for gaining incremental customers while assisting Spanish-dominant consumers to become more informed, confident and active consumers and participants in American society. SABEResPODER is a targeted Spanish-language multimedia network reaching Spanish dominant consumers at a key transition point when they are actively pursuing resources to further establish their lives in the United States. For more information about SABEResPODER, visit www.saberespoder.com.

About Best Buy Co., Inc.

With operations in the United States, Canada, Europe, China and Mexico, Best Buy is a multinational retailer of technology and entertainment products and services with a commitment to growth and innovation. Approximately 155,000 employees apply their talents to help bring the benefits of these brands to life for customers through retail locations, multiple call centers and Web sites, in-home solutions, product delivery and activities in our communities. Community partnership is central to the way we do business at Best Buy. In fiscal 2009, Best Buy donated a combined $33.4 million to improve the vitality of the communities where their employees and customers live and work. For more information about Best Buy, visit www.bestbuy.com


SOURCE SABEResPODER

AARP The Magazine Now a Most Read Consumer Magazine

Latest MRI Study Shows AARP The Magazine, People, and Better Homes & Gardens Lead the Way as Most Read Consumer Magazines

AARP The Magazine Now Has Three Times the Number of Readers as the Total Number of Twitter Followers of Ashton Kutcher, Oprah and Ryan Seacrest Combined*

AARP The Magazine continues to penetrate households as one of the industry leaders in reach and readership and is the only magazine to report consecutive growth in readership in the last six years, now boasting more than 35.7 million readers, as reported in the Fall 2009 Mediamark Research Inc. (MRI) survey. At a critical time for the publishing industry, AARP The Magazine joinsPeopleGood Housekeeping and Sports Illustrated as one of only four publications in the elite top 10 reach magazines group, that achieved growth in readership vs. Spring 2009 MRI. As the world’s largest circulation magazine and the definitive voice for 50+ Americans, AARP The Magazine now reaches three times as many readers as the total number of Twitter followers of Ashton Kutcher, Oprah and Ryan Seacrest combined.*

Additionally, it continues to be the No. 3 most read magazine by American adults (age 18+) after only People and Better Homes & Gardens, and remains the number No. 1 magazine in capturing the boomer audience. AARP The Magazine is now tied with Sports Illustrated in growth among influentials (461,000 more influentials vs. Spring 2009 MRI). Furthermore,AARP The Magazine readers have a 15% higher median household income and are 27% more likely to have graduated college with a B.A. or higher degree.

“As media fragmentation continues, AARP The Magazine bucks the trend with a 47% increase in audience over the past six years,” said Jim Fishman, SVP/Group Publisher, AARP Media. “By joining PeopleGood Housekeeping and Sports Illustrated as one of only four publications in the top 10 reach magazines to see growth in the recent MRI wave, AARP The Magazine further reinforces its effectiveness in reaching a vast and influential audience.”

As online activity grows and Facebook reports its fastest-growing demographic is age 55+ (ComScore, March 2009), AARP The Magazine’s online property (www.aarpmagazine.org) also experienced tremendous growth, gaining more than 1 million internet users. It is one of only five magazines that saw an increase of this magnitude.

In addition to AARP The Magazine, AARP’s media properties consist of AARP Bulletin and AARP Bulletin Today, the daily go-to news source for AARP’s nearly 40 million members and Americans 50+; AARP Segunda Juventud, the only bilingual U.S. multimedia property dedicated exclusively to the 50+ Hispanic community; www.AARP.org; AARP TV’s original programs My Generation and Inside E Street; and AARP’s nationally syndicated radio programs.

About AARP The Magazine

With more than 35.7 million readers nationwide, AARP The Magazine (www.aarpmagazine.org) is the world’s largest circulation magazine and the definitive lifestyle publication for Americans 50+. Reaching over 24 million households, AARP The Magazine delivers comprehensive content through in-depth celebrity interviews, health and fitness features, consumer interest information and tips, book and movie reviews and financial guidance. Published bimonthly in print and continually online, AARP The Magazine was founded in 1958 and is the flagship title of AARP Publications.

About AARP Media Sales

With unparalleled knowledge of 50+ consumers, as well as unique access across multiple media, AARP Media Sales connects marketers to the ever-growing and influential 50+ population. In addition to representing www.aarp.org, AARP’s trusted Web portal; AARP The Magazine, AARP’s flagship publication and the world’s largest circulation magazine with over 35.7 million readers; AARP Bulletin and AARP Bulletin Today, the daily go-to news source for AARP’s nearly 40 million members and Americans 50+; and AARP Segunda Juventud, the only bilingual U.S. multimedia property dedicated exclusively to the 50+ Hispanic community, AARP Media Sales also has sponsorships for television, radio as well as national and regional events.

*Based on number of Twitter followers as of November 18, 2009 at 1pm EST.

SOURCE AARP

New HomePath.com in Spanish to Help Hispanics Buy Homes

Fannie Mae Launches New HomePath.com in Spanish Aimed at Helping More Hispanics Buy Homes

Interactive Tools and Information Designed to Guide Potential Homeowners Through Homebuying Process and Prevent Foreclosure

Fannie Mae Launches New HomePath.com in Spanish Aimed at Helping More Hispanics Buy Homes

Fannie Mae Launches New HomePath.com in Spanish Aimed at Helping More Hispanics Buy Homes

Fannie Mae announced the company launched a Spanish version of its HomePath.com website designed to help more potential homeowners who speak Spanish purchase Fannie Mae-owned properties.

The new website in Spanish mirrors the English version of HomePath.com featuring an interactive search tool of Fannie Mae-owned properties nationwide, details about HomePath® financing, a mortgage payment calculator, property alerts, as well as information on foreclosure prevention and the Making Home Affordable((SM)) program.

Through HomePath.com, potential homeowners can access a database that includes a wide selection of homes from around the country – including the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico – which can be purchased directly from Fannie Mae. Properties include detailed information and photographs of single-family homes, condominiums, and town houses located in a variety of neighborhoods.

“HomePath.com is a great resource that can help people find a lifelong home for themselves and their families,” said Fannie Mae Executive Vice President, Terry W. Edwards. “The website has a wealth of information to inform and guide potential homeowners through the process of buying a Fannie Mae-owned property.”

The new release of HomePath.com in Spanish is part of a continuous effort aimed at improving access to information and resources which play a vital role in aiding both English and Spanish-speaking populations in the U.S. purchase homes, while helping minimize the impact on communities hit by foreclosures.

For more information about HomePath, please visit www.HomePath.com and click “En Espanol”, or for direct access to the website in Spanish, visit www.es.HomePath.com.

Fannie Mae exists to expand affordable housing and bring global capital to local communities in order to serve the U.S. housing market. Fannie Mae has a federal charter and operates in America’s secondary mortgage market to enhance the liquidity of the mortgage market by providing funds to mortgage bankers and other lenders so that they may lend to home buyers. Our job is to help those who house America.

Making Home Affordable is a trademark of the United States Department of the Treasury and is used under license.

SOURCE Fannie Mae

Breaking Through the Mammography Controversy

Individualized Decision Between Woman and Her Provider is the Best Choice for Screening

Breaking Through the Mammography Controversy

Breaking Through the Mammography Controversy

“The controversy around mammography emphasizes that the best decision on screening is made by a woman and her health care provider. Balancing a woman’s individual medical history, risks, and concern level about breast cancer is a decision at the individual level using guidelines as a guide and not as something fixed in concrete,” said Dr. Jane L. Delgado, President and CEO of the National Alliance for Hispanic Health, the nation’s leading Hispanic health advocacy group. “As a woman I want to make the decision about screening with my health care provider. Secretary Sebelius has offered assurance to the American people that she would work to ensure that such choice would not be limited by health insurance coverage policy.”

Dr. Delgado encouraged women to, “Talk to your health care provider about the risks of false positives that result from regular screening and radiation risks associated with screening and how to balance that with the benefits that mammography offers, particularly for women with higher risks for breast cancer.” According to Dr. Delgado, “The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has provided us with the best in available science, but the best decision will always be made by you and your health care provider. The Alliance is dedicated to ensuring that you will always have that choice.”

For women without access to a regular health care provider, the Alliance’s toll-free and bilingual Su Familia National Hispanic Family Health Helpline (1-866-SU-FAMILIA or 1-866-783-2645) is available to offer referral to low-cost and no-cost health services in a caller’s area. The service is available 9am to 6pm eastern standard time, Monday through Friday.

About the National Alliance for Hispanic Health

The National Alliance for Hispanic Health is the nation’s foremost science-based source of information and trusted advocate for the health of Hispanics in the United States. The Alliance represents thousands of Hispanic health providers across the nation providing services to more than 15 million each year, making a daily difference in the lives of Hispanic communities and families. For more information, call the Alliance’s Su Familia National Hispanic Family Health Helpline at 1-866-783-2645 or visit www.hispanichealth.org.

SOURCE National Alliance for Hispanic Health

Papatel Launches Free Phone Service Nationwide to Hispanics

Patented Technology Represents First Non-Internet Based Free Phone Service

Papatel Launches Free Phone Service Nationwide for US Hispanics

Papatel Launches Free Phone Service Nationwide for US Hispanics

Papatel, a new long-distance service that allows customers to call anywhere across the globe for free, today announced that it has launched nationwide after experiencing exponential growth during its test phase. In less than one year, Papatel has garnered more than 80,000 customers who use the service to call loved ones back home at no cost. The service is easy-to-use and takes less than five minutes to join, by logging on to www.papatel.com or calling 1-(866) PAPATEL.

Enrique Baiz, Founder and President of Papatel, commented; “many of us have families abroad, and keeping in touch with them internationally can be very costly. Particularly in this difficult economic climate, Papatel makes it free and easy to keep in touch with loved ones.”

It is so easy. Users establish an account by simply providing basic information including the numbers they will be calling from to make their long-distance calls (whether it be from the cell phone or landline) and they can start using Papatel immediately, with no strings attached. The registration, which takes less than five-minutes, is strictly confidential and the information is never shared with any other entity.

The free service is made possible through an innovative model in which advertisers place ads at the beginning of the calls and after long segments of conversation. Every week, users can acquire 1,000 free points, which allows users to call loved ones in Argentina or Mexico and talk up to 1.5 hours for free. Each time customers listen to an advertisement, they earn points, which provides them with more free long-distance minutes. Consumers can also hear weather reports or their horoscopes if they choose to.

In addition, Papatel offers users Papatel+, which is the company’s prepaid service that provides long distance rates with absolutely no advertisements. Rates to call anywhere around the world start as low as $.01. And, unlike other prepaid phone services, the balance never expires, and there are no hidden fees.

“It is the best deal a user can get for free international calls every week with no strings attached, and our prepaid and pinless international program is truly the top long-distance service in the market today,” added Baiz. “We want potential customers to know Papatel is committed to our promise, that is to offer completely free long distance service always.”

Today, Papatel has nearly 10 patents for this innovative technology, making it the world’s only free long distance service that does not require internet use. For more information or to register for the service, visit www.papatel.com, or call (866) PAPATEL.

About Papatel

Papatel is the world’s first non-internet based free phone service. Based in Miami, FL, the company currently has over 80,000 users in its first year of operation, and is rapidly expanding nationwide. For more information, visit www.papatel.com.

SOURCE Papatel

Understanding Latino Boomers

Understanding Latino Boomers

Understanding Latino Boomers

Focalyst, a reseach firm specialized in seniors and boomers, presented the results of a new study that provides valuable insights on one of the most complex segments of the U.S. Hispanic population: seniors

Latino Boomers (those born between 1946 and 1964) represent approximately 10% of the U.S. Boomer segment – over 7 million consumers – but cannot be segmented by language alone, a Focalyst study concludes.

“Marketers need to look beyond language and understand the demographic, attitudinal and behavioral differences within the Latino Boomer market in order to reach this target,” said Jack Lett, executive director of Focalyst.

Two in three Hispanic Boomers are “more acculturated,” considered either “Bicultural” or “Acculturated” :

•Bicultural Hispanics – 24% of Latino Boomers – are US-born or foreign-born and have lived many years in the US; they are bilingual and consume both English and Spanish media; they identify with aspects of both cultures.

•Acculturated Hispanics – 41% – are US-born and English-dominant; they consume English media; and they identify strongly with American culture, but still keep ties with their Hispanic culture.

•Unacculturated Hispanics – 35% – are foreign-born and speak Spanish in the home; they consume more Spanish than non-Spanish media; and they identify strongly with their native culture.

Understanding Latino Boomers: Demographic Profile

The study found that Bicultural Hispanic Boomers…

•Earn 23% less income on average than General Market Boomers ($56,607 compared with $73,921) – though they are equally likely to be employed (77%).

•Are slightly more likely to be married or partnered (75%) than both Acculturated (64%) and General Market Boomers (69%).

•Are less likely to be college educated – 55% of them have a college education, compared with 69% of Acculturated Boomers and 73% of General Market Boomers.

Understanding Latino Boomers: Family

Hispanic Boomers live in larger households (3.3 people per household vs. 2.9 for the General Market), often made up of younger children, adult children, or older relatives. Bicultural households have the largest household composition (3.6 people):

In addition…

•Acculturated Boomers are the most likely to be a caregiver for a family member, with 14% recently taking on this role.

•Besides supporting larger households, one in four Latino Boomers are providing substantial financial support to someone outside of their homes.

Understanding Latino Boomers: Future Plans

Acculturated Latino Boomers are more likely to aspire to continue their education (28%), whereas Bicultural Hispanics have more entrepreneurial desires – 32% said they want to start a new business, compared with 17% of General Market Boomers:

More findings:

•More than half (51%) of Bicultural Latino Boomers said it is important that their family think they are doing well

•86% of Bicultural Hispanic Boomers agreed that they have been fortunate in life, and 80% said they have accomplished a great deal – more so than General Market (77%) and Acculturated (76%) Boomers.

Source: Marketing Charts