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Latinos Online 2012 Study

A Latinos Online 2012 study was presented by comScore, world leader in measuring of the digital world. The Latinos Online 2012 study shows a mexican online population reaching 27.9 million unique visitors in June 2012 and consumed an average of 20.5 hours per month per visitor.

Latinos Online Study | PhotoOther important discoveries included in the report are:

  • Mexicans consumed 7.8 hours/month per visitor on social networks
  • Politics sites saw a 384% growth in the a month of visitors since last year
  • 81.7% of the Mexican internet audience watched online videos
  • The biggest amount of visitors to retail sites were made in Hardware and Computer Software
  • 3 of 5 internet visitors in Latin America are 35 or younger
  • Venezuela, Colombia and Mexico have the youngest users online
  • Google sites are the most visited destination in Mexico, Facebook has the most activity
  • Mexicans access instant messaging, blogs and photography sites more than the global average
  • Facebook leads and will continue to grow; LinkedIn and Tumblr have an impressive growth in Mexico
  • 8.7 hours consumed on Facebook on average per visitor in Mexico. 90% penetration in Mexico
  • Youtube is the most popular entertainment site in Mexico, reaching 76% of the audience
  • Mexican users see 157 videos on average per user
  • Mexican visitors of business/finance sites is still the lowest in the region.
  • Windows Live Messenger is overwhelmingly the favorite of Mexico.
  • Sites for lifestyle, in particular those focusing on women and family visits lead the community.
  • Education sites attract 42% of Web population in Mexico.
  • The UNAM is the most visited site in Mexico in the Education category.
  • Mexico leads together with Chile in traffic of mobile devices connected in the region.
  • Brazil and Mexico are the most used tablets.
sometimes people with the worst past end up creating the best futures | #inspirational #quote

sometimes people with the worst past end up creating the best futures

Source: comScore

Image: Shutterstock

Selling online from North America to Latin America

A grow­ing number of U.S. online retailers and consumer brand manufacturers are taking that challenge on by setting up shop and selling online in Latin America.

It wasn’t quite the same as graduating from the e-commerce school of hard knocks, but after six years of trial and error Tradercom USA Inc. has learned some valuable lessons about what works—and what doesn’t—in selling online in Latin America.

In 2006, Tradercom CEO Federico Torres set out to build an online retailing business in Latin America from a base in the U.S. To carve out a niche in Latin America’s growing business-to-consumer e-commerce market, which eMarketer estimates will grow about 110% from $29.70 billion in 2011 to $62.42 billion in 2016, Tradercom had ambitious plans to build a web store in multiple countries and offer steep discounts on well-known American products such as Fossil watches and Weber grills that are not always available through merchants in Latin America.

Latin America E-Commerce - Selling Online to Latin America

Latin America E-Commerce – Selling Online to Latin America

But selling online in a foreign country is never easy, especially in Latin America, a fast-growing and still-developing e-commerce arena where U.S. merchants face several substantial barriers to entry, including big tariffs and government red tape, sketchy local delivery options, and plenty of cultural differences. “There is a huge opportunity for U.S. web merchants such as us to develop a significant e-commerce business in Latin America, but there are significant challenges that we had to work our way through.” Torres says. “It took us a long time, lots of patience and a willingness to always try a new approach to build up a steady base of shoppers.”

Tradercom is one of a grow­ing number of U.S. online retailers and consumer brand manufacturers setting up shop and selling online in Latin America. The market already includes 25 U.S. companies ranked in the Top 300 Latin America, which in 2011 had combined web sales of $1.43 billion, up 32.4% from $1.08 billion in the prior year.

And more North American online retailers are seriously eyeing Latin America for a new interna­tional opportunity or expanding their existing base of operations. For example Apple Inc. (No. 11), which has been selling computer hardware online in Latin America for several years, in December 2011 launched an iTunes store with a catalog of 20 million song titles for Brazil and 15 other countries in Latin America.

Consumers in Latin America also are big fans of mobile commerce and social media, and looking to conve­niently shop online for the products they can’t find in local stores, says Kent Allen, principal and founder of The Research Trust, a San Francisco-based e-commerce and retailing industry research firm with clients in the U.S. and Latin America. “There’s only a handful of global e-commerce markets left where there are still lots of ground-floor opportunities to be the next category-killer web store, hot niche player or even the next Amazon, and that’s Latin America,” Allen says. “E-commerce in Brazil, Mexico and other parts of the region are still in an early growth stage and that’s attracting the attention of lots of U.S. merchants.”

Source: Internet Retailer

#wordsofwisdom

#wordsofwisdom

Latinas, Social Media and Buzz influence

How much do you know about Latinas online habits? This Social Media and Buzz study unveils key purchase + influence patterns to marketing success.

One does not simply ignore Latino women - Aragorn

One does not simply ignore Latino women – Aragorn

63% of the women interviewed use Orkut, Facebook, Twitter and other social media networks to search for information before purchasing a product or service. Books, magazines and electronics are the categories consulted the most.

Latinas consult with their social network before they make a purchase

Women now represent the majority of users of social networks in the world, a trend that continues to grow. And they do not use these networks just to communicate with friends and family, read on subjects of interest or for academic or professional purposes. Every day more women search for information on products and services on their social networks.

A survey of 3,274 women from 18 to 60 years old, residents of Brazil, Argentina, Mexico, and U.S. Latinas, conducted by Sophia Mind, a market intelligence company, indicates that 63% of these women use social media to gather information before making a purchase, and for 70% of them the probability of purchasing a major product or service increases if it is recommended by a social media friend.

Electronics are the products most consulted by them – 66% consider important to exchange information on them on the web before committing to their purchase. Forty eight per center do the same with magazines and books; 47 %, with songs; 45 %, with movies and products related to tourism; and 42 % with cosmetics.

Jewelry is an exception, the great majority of Latinas (89 %) believes this is a personal choice.

Social Media and Buzz Influence

Social Media and Buzz Influence

Brazilians (66 %) and latin americans (56 %) are the greatest contributors and generators of buzz influence as they share most to their experiences in social media recommending or not a product or service. In all of the countries surveyed the rate of positive comments was greater than the negative. Another similarity amongst the women in these countries is that 50% of them may give up a purchase if a product or service is not well rated in social media networks.

Social Media and Buzz influence regarding Latina purchasing decisions

In Argentina, the United States and Mexico, 87% of women cite Facebook as the most influential. And 25% of them say they have already made purchases based on comments or indications of friends of that social network. Twitter appears in second place, with a 17% buzz influence. Advertising also has greater influence on Facebook: 18% of the respondents have already purchased products based on messages or announcements viewed on this channel. Also, on Facebook, one in five women have already withdrawn from making a purchase due to negative buzz about a product or service.

In Brazil, Orkut remains as the social network with greater penetration amongst women: 85 %. Sonic, Twitter and Facebook are tied in second place, with approximately 21 %. Twenty-nine percent of brazilians have made purchases in Orkut based on announcements or messages of companies and 21% are no longer using some products because of negative comments.

Cry as hard as you want to, but just make sure that when you stop crying, you never cry for the same reason again

Cry as hard as you want to, but just make sure that when you stop crying, you never cry for the same reason again

Next Quote? funny inspirational quotes on every post!

Body language: the meaning of gestures in Mexico

Gestures in Mexico

Gestures in Mexico

Body language is an important part of the communication process. Noticing the signals that people send out with their body language is a very useful social skill. All who specialize in research, grassroots marketing, community outreach, event marketing understand that body language is a key body of knowledge to have.

This is the first of a Hispanic culture series on body language and gestures in Latin American countries.

The meaning of gestures in Mexico

  • A warm, somewhat soft handshake is the customary greeting among both men and women. Men should let the woman make the first move toward handshaking. After the second or third meeting, Mexican men may begin with or add the abrazo, the embrace along with a few pats on the back. Women friends will embrace lightly and pretend to kiss a cheek.
  • In some areas of Mexico, you may encounter an unusual addition to the handshake where, after gripping the palm, the two people slide their hands upward to grasp each other’s thumbs.
  • Many Mexicans are ‘touch oriented.’ This means they may linger over a handshake, they may touch the forearm or elbow, or they may even casually finger the lapel of the other person’s suit. All these touches merely signify a willingness to be friendly nothing more.
  • If a man stands with his hands on his hips, it suggests hostility.
  • Deference is shown to the elderly, so give way to them in public and don’t object if they are waited on first.
  • Never visit churches or religious sites while wearing shorts, tank tops, or cut-off shirts or shorts.
  • The national drink in Mexico is tequila. To drink it properly, here is the procedure: place a pinch of salt in the depression of your left hand between thumb and forefinger; then lick the salt and quickly take a drink of tequila; follow this by sucking on a lime wedge.
  • You can call attention to yourself or call a waiter by lifting your hand above your head or maybe a bit lower with the index finger extended upwards and adding a “Pssst!” or “Pshhh!” sound. This is not considered rude and it also applies to other cultures such as Haiti, Argentina, and Spain.
  • Patience is important; avoid showing anger if and when you encounter delays or interruptions.
people may not tell you how they feel about you but they always show you

people may not tell you how they feel about you but they always show you

Is Mexico the “New” China?

When it comes to global manufacturing, Mexico is quickly emerging as the “new” China.

According to corporate consultant AlixPartners, Mexico has leapfrogged China to be ranked as the cheapest country in the world for companies looking to manufacture products for the U.S. market. India is now No. 2, followed by China and then Brazil.

In fact, Mexico’s cost advantages and has become so cheap that even Chinese companies are moving there to capitalize on the trade advantages that come from geographic proximity.

According to corporate consultant AlixPartners, Mexico has leapfrogged China to be ranked as the cheapest country in the world for companies looking to manufacture products for the U.S. market. India is now No. 2, followed by China and then Brazil. In fact, Mexico’s cost advantages and has become so cheap that even Chinese companies are moving there to capitalize on the trade advantages that come from geographic proximity.

According to corporate consultant AlixPartners, Mexico has leapfrogged China to be ranked as the cheapest country in the world for companies looking to manufacture products for the U.S. market. India is now No. 2, followed by China and then Brazil. In fact, Mexico’s cost advantages and has become so cheap that even Chinese companies are moving there to capitalize on the trade advantages that come from geographic proximity.

The influx of Chinese manufacturers began early in the decade, as China-based firms in the cellular telephone, television, textile and automobile sectors began to establish maquiladora operations in Mexico. By 2005, there were 20-25 Chinese manufacturers operating in such Mexican states Chihuahua, Tamaulipas and Baja.

The investments were generally small, but the operations had managed to create nearly 4,000 jobs, Enrique Castro Septien, president of the Consejo Nacional de la Industria Maquiladora de Exportacion (CNIME), told the SourceMex news portal in a 2005 interview.

China’s push into Mexico became more concentrated, with China-based automakers Zhongxing Automobile Co., First Automotive Works (in partnership with Mexican retail/media heavyweight Grupo Salinas), Geely Automobile Holdings (PINK: GELYF) and ChangAn Automobile Group Co. Ltd. (the Chinese partner of Ford Motor Co. (NYSE: F) andSuzuki Motor Corp.), all announced plans to place automaking factoriesin Mexico.

Not all the plans would come to fruition. But Geely’s plan called for a three-phase project that would ultimately involve a $270 million investment and have a total annual capacity of 300,000 vehicles. ChangAn wants to churn out 50,000 vehicles a year. Both companies are taking these steps with the ultimate goal of selling cars to U.S. consumers.

Mexico’s allure as a production site that can serve the U.S. market isn’t limited to China-based suitors. U.S. companies are increasingly realizing that Mexico is a better option than China. Analysts are calling it “nearshoring” or “reverse globalization.” But the reality is this: With wages on the rise in China, ongoing worries about whipsaw energy and commodity prices, and a dollar-yuan relationship that’s destined to get much uglier before it has a chance of improving, manufacturers with an eye on the American market are increasingly realizing that Mexico trumps China in virtually every equation the producers run.

“China was like a recent graduate, hitting the job market for the first time and willing to work for next to nothing,” Mexico-manufacturing consultant German Dominguez told the Christian Science Monitor in an interview last year. But now China is experiencing “the perfect storm … it’s making Mexico – a country that had been the ugly duckling when it came to costs – look a lot better.”

The real eye opener was a 2008 speculative frenzy that sent crude oil prices up to a record level in excess of $147 a barrel – an escalation that caused shipping prices to soar. Suddenly, the labor cost advantage China enjoyed wasn’t enough to overcome the costs of shipping finished goods thousands of miles from Asia to North America. And that reality kick-started the concept of “nearshoring,” concluded an investment research report by Canadian investment bank CIBC World Markets Inc. (NYSE: CM)

“In a world of triple-digit oil prices, distance costs money,” the CIBC research analysts wrote. “And while trade liberalization and technology may have flattened the world, rising transport prices will once again make it rounder.”

Indeed, four factors are at work here.

Mexico’s “Fab Four”

  • The U.S.-Mexico Connection: There’s no question that China’s role in the post-financial-crisis world economy will continue to grow in importance. But contrary to the conventional wisdom, U.S. firms still export three times as much to Mexico as they do to China. Mexico gets 75% of its foreign direct investment from the United States, and sends 85% of its exports back across U.S. borders. As China’s cost and currency advantages dissipate, the fact that the United States and Mexico are right next to one another makes it logical to keep the factories in this hemisphere – if for no other reason that to shorten the supply chain and to hold down shipping costs. This is particularly important for companies like Johnson & Johnson (NYSE: JNJ), Whirlpool Corp. (NYSE:WHR) and even the beleaguered auto parts maker Delphi Corp. (PINK: DPHIQ) which are involved in just-in-time manufacturing that requires parts be delivered only as fast as they are needed.
  • The Lost Cost Advantage: A decade or more ago, in any discussion of manufactured product costs, Asia was hands-down the low-cost producer. That’s a given no more. Recent reports – including the analysis by AlixPartners – show that Asia’s production costs are 15% or 20% higher than they were just four years ago. A U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics report from March reaches the same conclusion. Compensation costs in East Asia – a region that includes China but excludes Japan – rose from 32% of U.S. wages in 2002 to 43% in 2007, the most recent statistics available. And since wages are advancing at a rate of 8% to 9% a year, and many types of taxes are escalating, too, East Asia’s overall costs have no doubt escalated even more in the two years since the BLS figures were reported.
  • The Creeping Currency Crisis: For the past few years, U.S. elected officials and corporate executives alike have groused that China keeps its currency artificially low to boost its exports, while also reducing U.S. imports. The U.S. trade deficit with China has soared, growing by $20.2 billion in August alone to reach $143 billion so far this year. The currency debate will be part of the discussion when U.S. President Barack Obama visits Chinastarting Monday. Because China’s yuan has strengthened so much, goods made in China may not be the bargain they once were. Those currency crosscurrents aren’t a problem with the U.S. and Mexico, however. As of Monday, the dollar was down about 15% from its March 2009 high. At the same time, however, the Mexican peso had dropped 20% versus the dollar. So while the yuan was getting stronger as the dollar got cheaper, the peso was getting even cheaper versus the dollar.
  • Trade Alliance Central: Everyone’s familiar with the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).  But not everyone understands the impact that NAFTA has had. It isn’t just window-dressing: Mexico’s trade with the United States and Canada has tripled since NAFTA was enacted in 1994. What’s more, Mexico has 12 free-trade agreements that involve more than 40 countries – more than any other country and enough to cover more than 90% of the country’s foreign trade. Its goods can be exported – duty-free – to the United States, Canada, the European Union, most of Central and Latin America, and to Japan.

In the global scheme of things, what I am telling you here probably won’t be a game-changer when it comes to China. That country is an economic juggernaut and is a market that U.S. investors cannot afford to ignore.  Given China’s emerging strength and its increasingly dominant financial position, it’s going to have its own consumer markets to service for decades to come.

Two Profit Play Candidates

From a regional standpoint, these developments all show that we’re in the earliest stages of what could be an even-closer Mexican/American relationship – enhancing the existing trade partnership in ways that benefit companies on both sides of the border (even companies that hail from other parts of the world).

In the meantime, we’ll be watching for signs of a resurgent Mexican manufacturing industry that’s ultimately driven by Chinese companies – because we know the American companies doing business with them will enjoy the fruits of their labor.

Since this is an early stage opportunity best for investors capable of stomaching some serious volatility, we’ll be watching for those Mexican companies likely to benefit from the capital that’s being newly deployed in their backyard.

Two of my favorite choices include:

  • Wal Mart de Mexico SAB de CV (OTC ADR: WMMVY): Also known as “Walmex,” this retailer has all the advantages of investing in its U.S. counterpart – albeit with a couple of twists. Walmex’s third-quarter profits were up 18% and the company just started accepting bank deposits, a service that should boost store traffic. And while the U.S. retail market is highly saturated – which limits growth opportunities – there are still plenty of places to build Walmex stores south of the border. After all, somebody has to sell products to all those thousands of workers likely to be involved in the growing maquiladora sector.
  • Coca-Cola FEMSA SAB de CV (NYSE ADR: KOF): Things truly do go better with Coke – especially higher wages and an improved lifestyle. According toReuters, Mexicans now consume more Coca-Cola beverages per capita than any other nation in the world. The company just posted a 25% jump in its third-quarter net earnings, aided by a strong 21% jump in revenue. Coca-Cola FEMSA continues to experience strong growth from its Oxxo convenience stores, and strong beer sales, too. And all three product groups are logical beneficiaries of strong maquiladora development and the growing incomes and rising family wealth that will translate into higher consumer spending in the immediately surrounding areas.

Source: Keith Fitz-Gerald is the chief investment strategist for Money Morning and The Money Map Report.

whoever is trying to bring you down

whoever is trying to bring you down

Revealing facts on Mexican Hispanics

A total of 30.7 million Hispanics of Mexican origin resided in the United States in 2008, according to the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey. Mexicans in this statistical profile are people who self-identified as Hispanics of Mexican origin or Mexican Hispanics; this means either they themselves are Mexican immigrants or they trace their family ancestry to Mexico.  Mexicans are the largest population of Hispanic origin living in the United States, accounting for nearly two-thirds (65.7%) of the U.S. Hispanic population in 2008.

1 This statistical profile compares the demographic, income and economic characteristics of the Mexican Hispanics population with the characteristics of all Hispanics and the U.S. population overall. It is based on Pew Hispanic Center tabulations of the 2008 American Community Survey. Key facts include:

Immigration status. Nearly four-in-ten Mexicans (37.0%) in the United States are foreign born, compared with 38.1% of Hispanics and 12.5% of the U.S. population overall. Most immigrants from Mexico (63.4%) arrived in the U.S. in 1990 or later. Two-in-ten of Mexican immigrants (22.0%) are U.S. citizens.

Language. A majority of Mexicans (61.6%) speak English proficiently.

2 Some 38.4% of Mexicans ages 5 and older report speaking English less than very well, compared with 37.3% of all Hispanics.

Age. Mexican Hispanics are younger than the U.S. population and Hispanics overall. The median age of Mexican Hispanics is 25; the median ages of the U.S. population and all Hispanics are 36 and 27, respectively.

Marital status. Less than half of Mexican Hispanics (48.2%) and Hispanics overall (46.5%) are married.

1 Percentages are computed before numbers are rounded.

2 Mexicans ages 5 and older who report speaking only English at home or speaking English very well.

Fertility. Thirty-eight percent of Mexican women ages 15 to 44 who gave birth in the 12 months prior to the survey were unmarried. That was similar to the rate for all Hispanic women—38.8%—but greater than the rate for U.S. women—34.5%.

Regional dispersion. Nearly four-in-ten Mexicans (36.7%) live in California, and one-in-four (25.2%) live in Texas.

Educational attainment. Mexicans have lower levels of education than the Hispanic population overall. Nine percent of Mexican Hispanics ages 25 and older—compared with 12.9% of all U.S. Hispanics—have obtained at least a bachelor’s degree.

Income. The median annual personal earnings for Mexicans ages 16 and older were $20,368 in 2008; the median earnings for all U.S. Hispanics were $21,488.

Poverty status. The share of Mexicans who live in poverty, 22.3%, is higher than the rate for the general U.S. population (12.7%) and similar to the share for all Hispanics (20.7%).

Health Insurance. One-third of Mexicans (34.8%) do not have health insurance compared with 31.7% of all Hispanics and 15.4% of the general U.S. population. Additionally, 20.4% of Mexicans younger than 18 are uninsured.

Homeownership. The rate of Mexican homeownership (50.5%) is similar to the rate for all Hispanics (49.1%) but lower than the 66.6% rate for the U.S. population as a whole.


Source: Pew Hispanic

Papatel Launches Free Phone Service Nationwide to Hispanics

Patented Technology Represents First Non-Internet Based Free Phone Service

Papatel Launches Free Phone Service Nationwide for US Hispanics

Papatel Launches Free Phone Service Nationwide for US Hispanics

Papatel, a new long-distance service that allows customers to call anywhere across the globe for free, today announced that it has launched nationwide after experiencing exponential growth during its test phase. In less than one year, Papatel has garnered more than 80,000 customers who use the service to call loved ones back home at no cost. The service is easy-to-use and takes less than five minutes to join, by logging on to www.papatel.com or calling 1-(866) PAPATEL.

Enrique Baiz, Founder and President of Papatel, commented; “many of us have families abroad, and keeping in touch with them internationally can be very costly. Particularly in this difficult economic climate, Papatel makes it free and easy to keep in touch with loved ones.”

It is so easy. Users establish an account by simply providing basic information including the numbers they will be calling from to make their long-distance calls (whether it be from the cell phone or landline) and they can start using Papatel immediately, with no strings attached. The registration, which takes less than five-minutes, is strictly confidential and the information is never shared with any other entity.

The free service is made possible through an innovative model in which advertisers place ads at the beginning of the calls and after long segments of conversation. Every week, users can acquire 1,000 free points, which allows users to call loved ones in Argentina or Mexico and talk up to 1.5 hours for free. Each time customers listen to an advertisement, they earn points, which provides them with more free long-distance minutes. Consumers can also hear weather reports or their horoscopes if they choose to.

In addition, Papatel offers users Papatel+, which is the company’s prepaid service that provides long distance rates with absolutely no advertisements. Rates to call anywhere around the world start as low as $.01. And, unlike other prepaid phone services, the balance never expires, and there are no hidden fees.

“It is the best deal a user can get for free international calls every week with no strings attached, and our prepaid and pinless international program is truly the top long-distance service in the market today,” added Baiz. “We want potential customers to know Papatel is committed to our promise, that is to offer completely free long distance service always.”

Today, Papatel has nearly 10 patents for this innovative technology, making it the world’s only free long distance service that does not require internet use. For more information or to register for the service, visit www.papatel.com, or call (866) PAPATEL.

About Papatel

Papatel is the world’s first non-internet based free phone service. Based in Miami, FL, the company currently has over 80,000 users in its first year of operation, and is rapidly expanding nationwide. For more information, visit www.papatel.com.

SOURCE Papatel

Día de la Raza or Columbus Day?

Día de la Raza - Columbus Day

Día de la Raza – Columbus Day

What do you really know about Día de la Raza? Where was it first celebrated? Why Raza and Columbus Day? How do they celebrate it in Spain? Read on and find out.

The date of Columbus’ arrival in the Americas is celebrated in many countries in Latin America, although not in Brazil, (and in some Latino communities in the United States) as the Día de la Raza (“day of the race or breed”), commemorating the first encounters of Europeans and Native Americans. The day was first celebrated in Argentina in 1917, Venezuela in 1921, Chile in 1922, and Mexico in 1928. The day was also celebrated under this title in Spain until 1957, when it was changed to the Día de la Hispanidad (“Hispanicity Day”), and in Venezuela until 2002, when it was changed to the Día de la Resistencia Indígena (Day of Indigenous Resistance) by President Hugo Chavez. Día de la Raza in many countries is seen as a counter to Columbus Day. It is used to resist the arrival of Europeans to the Americas and is used to celebrate the native races.

Día de la Raza in the U.S.

In the U.S. Día de la Raza has served as a time of mobilization for pan-ethnic Latino activists, particularly in the 1960s. Since then, La Raza has served as a periodic rallying cry for Hispanic activists. The first Hispanic March on Washington occurred on Columbus Day in 1996. The name has remained in the largest Hispanic social justice organization, the National Council of La Raza.

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Thought of the Day

small minds

small minds

Latinos Online 2012 Study

A Latinos Online 2012 study was presented by comScore, world leader in measuring of the digital world. The Latinos Online 2012 study shows a mexican online population reaching 27.9 million unique visitors in June 2012 and consumed an average of 20.5 hours per month per visitor.

Latinos Online Study | PhotoOther important discoveries included in the report are:

  • Mexicans consumed 7.8 hours/month per visitor on social networks
  • Politics sites saw a 384% growth in the a month of visitors since last year
  • 81.7% of the Mexican internet audience watched online videos
  • The biggest amount of visitors to retail sites were made in Hardware and Computer Software
  • 3 of 5 internet visitors in Latin America are 35 or younger
  • Venezuela, Colombia and Mexico have the youngest users online
  • Google sites are the most visited destination in Mexico, Facebook has the most activity
  • Mexicans access instant messaging, blogs and photography sites more than the global average
  • Facebook leads and will continue to grow; LinkedIn and Tumblr have an impressive growth in Mexico
  • 8.7 hours consumed on Facebook on average per visitor in Mexico. 90% penetration in Mexico
  • Youtube is the most popular entertainment site in Mexico, reaching 76% of the audience
  • Mexican users see 157 videos on average per user
  • Mexican visitors of business/finance sites is still the lowest in the region.
  • Windows Live Messenger is overwhelmingly the favorite of Mexico.
  • Sites for lifestyle, in particular those focusing on women and family visits lead the community.
  • Education sites attract 42% of Web population in Mexico.
  • The UNAM is the most visited site in Mexico in the Education category.
  • Mexico leads together with Chile in traffic of mobile devices connected in the region.
  • Brazil and Mexico are the most used tablets.
sometimes people with the worst past end up creating the best futures | #inspirational #quote

sometimes people with the worst past end up creating the best futures

Source: comScore

Image: Shutterstock

Selling online from North America to Latin America

A grow­ing number of U.S. online retailers and consumer brand manufacturers are taking that challenge on by setting up shop and selling online in Latin America.

It wasn’t quite the same as graduating from the e-commerce school of hard knocks, but after six years of trial and error Tradercom USA Inc. has learned some valuable lessons about what works—and what doesn’t—in selling online in Latin America.

In 2006, Tradercom CEO Federico Torres set out to build an online retailing business in Latin America from a base in the U.S. To carve out a niche in Latin America’s growing business-to-consumer e-commerce market, which eMarketer estimates will grow about 110% from $29.70 billion in 2011 to $62.42 billion in 2016, Tradercom had ambitious plans to build a web store in multiple countries and offer steep discounts on well-known American products such as Fossil watches and Weber grills that are not always available through merchants in Latin America.

Latin America E-Commerce - Selling Online to Latin America

Latin America E-Commerce – Selling Online to Latin America

But selling online in a foreign country is never easy, especially in Latin America, a fast-growing and still-developing e-commerce arena where U.S. merchants face several substantial barriers to entry, including big tariffs and government red tape, sketchy local delivery options, and plenty of cultural differences. “There is a huge opportunity for U.S. web merchants such as us to develop a significant e-commerce business in Latin America, but there are significant challenges that we had to work our way through.” Torres says. “It took us a long time, lots of patience and a willingness to always try a new approach to build up a steady base of shoppers.”

Tradercom is one of a grow­ing number of U.S. online retailers and consumer brand manufacturers setting up shop and selling online in Latin America. The market already includes 25 U.S. companies ranked in the Top 300 Latin America, which in 2011 had combined web sales of $1.43 billion, up 32.4% from $1.08 billion in the prior year.

And more North American online retailers are seriously eyeing Latin America for a new interna­tional opportunity or expanding their existing base of operations. For example Apple Inc. (No. 11), which has been selling computer hardware online in Latin America for several years, in December 2011 launched an iTunes store with a catalog of 20 million song titles for Brazil and 15 other countries in Latin America.

Consumers in Latin America also are big fans of mobile commerce and social media, and looking to conve­niently shop online for the products they can’t find in local stores, says Kent Allen, principal and founder of The Research Trust, a San Francisco-based e-commerce and retailing industry research firm with clients in the U.S. and Latin America. “There’s only a handful of global e-commerce markets left where there are still lots of ground-floor opportunities to be the next category-killer web store, hot niche player or even the next Amazon, and that’s Latin America,” Allen says. “E-commerce in Brazil, Mexico and other parts of the region are still in an early growth stage and that’s attracting the attention of lots of U.S. merchants.”

Source: Internet Retailer

#wordsofwisdom

#wordsofwisdom

Latinas, Social Media and Buzz influence

How much do you know about Latinas online habits? This Social Media and Buzz study unveils key purchase + influence patterns to marketing success.

One does not simply ignore Latino women - Aragorn

One does not simply ignore Latino women – Aragorn

63% of the women interviewed use Orkut, Facebook, Twitter and other social media networks to search for information before purchasing a product or service. Books, magazines and electronics are the categories consulted the most.

Latinas consult with their social network before they make a purchase

Women now represent the majority of users of social networks in the world, a trend that continues to grow. And they do not use these networks just to communicate with friends and family, read on subjects of interest or for academic or professional purposes. Every day more women search for information on products and services on their social networks.

A survey of 3,274 women from 18 to 60 years old, residents of Brazil, Argentina, Mexico, and U.S. Latinas, conducted by Sophia Mind, a market intelligence company, indicates that 63% of these women use social media to gather information before making a purchase, and for 70% of them the probability of purchasing a major product or service increases if it is recommended by a social media friend.

Electronics are the products most consulted by them – 66% consider important to exchange information on them on the web before committing to their purchase. Forty eight per center do the same with magazines and books; 47 %, with songs; 45 %, with movies and products related to tourism; and 42 % with cosmetics.

Jewelry is an exception, the great majority of Latinas (89 %) believes this is a personal choice.

Social Media and Buzz Influence

Social Media and Buzz Influence

Brazilians (66 %) and latin americans (56 %) are the greatest contributors and generators of buzz influence as they share most to their experiences in social media recommending or not a product or service. In all of the countries surveyed the rate of positive comments was greater than the negative. Another similarity amongst the women in these countries is that 50% of them may give up a purchase if a product or service is not well rated in social media networks.

Social Media and Buzz influence regarding Latina purchasing decisions

In Argentina, the United States and Mexico, 87% of women cite Facebook as the most influential. And 25% of them say they have already made purchases based on comments or indications of friends of that social network. Twitter appears in second place, with a 17% buzz influence. Advertising also has greater influence on Facebook: 18% of the respondents have already purchased products based on messages or announcements viewed on this channel. Also, on Facebook, one in five women have already withdrawn from making a purchase due to negative buzz about a product or service.

In Brazil, Orkut remains as the social network with greater penetration amongst women: 85 %. Sonic, Twitter and Facebook are tied in second place, with approximately 21 %. Twenty-nine percent of brazilians have made purchases in Orkut based on announcements or messages of companies and 21% are no longer using some products because of negative comments.

Cry as hard as you want to, but just make sure that when you stop crying, you never cry for the same reason again

Cry as hard as you want to, but just make sure that when you stop crying, you never cry for the same reason again

Next Quote? funny inspirational quotes on every post!

Body language: the meaning of gestures in Mexico

Gestures in Mexico

Gestures in Mexico

Body language is an important part of the communication process. Noticing the signals that people send out with their body language is a very useful social skill. All who specialize in research, grassroots marketing, community outreach, event marketing understand that body language is a key body of knowledge to have.

This is the first of a Hispanic culture series on body language and gestures in Latin American countries.

The meaning of gestures in Mexico

  • A warm, somewhat soft handshake is the customary greeting among both men and women. Men should let the woman make the first move toward handshaking. After the second or third meeting, Mexican men may begin with or add the abrazo, the embrace along with a few pats on the back. Women friends will embrace lightly and pretend to kiss a cheek.
  • In some areas of Mexico, you may encounter an unusual addition to the handshake where, after gripping the palm, the two people slide their hands upward to grasp each other’s thumbs.
  • Many Mexicans are ‘touch oriented.’ This means they may linger over a handshake, they may touch the forearm or elbow, or they may even casually finger the lapel of the other person’s suit. All these touches merely signify a willingness to be friendly nothing more.
  • If a man stands with his hands on his hips, it suggests hostility.
  • Deference is shown to the elderly, so give way to them in public and don’t object if they are waited on first.
  • Never visit churches or religious sites while wearing shorts, tank tops, or cut-off shirts or shorts.
  • The national drink in Mexico is tequila. To drink it properly, here is the procedure: place a pinch of salt in the depression of your left hand between thumb and forefinger; then lick the salt and quickly take a drink of tequila; follow this by sucking on a lime wedge.
  • You can call attention to yourself or call a waiter by lifting your hand above your head or maybe a bit lower with the index finger extended upwards and adding a “Pssst!” or “Pshhh!” sound. This is not considered rude and it also applies to other cultures such as Haiti, Argentina, and Spain.
  • Patience is important; avoid showing anger if and when you encounter delays or interruptions.
people may not tell you how they feel about you but they always show you

people may not tell you how they feel about you but they always show you

Is Mexico the “New” China?

When it comes to global manufacturing, Mexico is quickly emerging as the “new” China.

According to corporate consultant AlixPartners, Mexico has leapfrogged China to be ranked as the cheapest country in the world for companies looking to manufacture products for the U.S. market. India is now No. 2, followed by China and then Brazil.

In fact, Mexico’s cost advantages and has become so cheap that even Chinese companies are moving there to capitalize on the trade advantages that come from geographic proximity.

According to corporate consultant AlixPartners, Mexico has leapfrogged China to be ranked as the cheapest country in the world for companies looking to manufacture products for the U.S. market. India is now No. 2, followed by China and then Brazil. In fact, Mexico’s cost advantages and has become so cheap that even Chinese companies are moving there to capitalize on the trade advantages that come from geographic proximity.

According to corporate consultant AlixPartners, Mexico has leapfrogged China to be ranked as the cheapest country in the world for companies looking to manufacture products for the U.S. market. India is now No. 2, followed by China and then Brazil. In fact, Mexico’s cost advantages and has become so cheap that even Chinese companies are moving there to capitalize on the trade advantages that come from geographic proximity.

The influx of Chinese manufacturers began early in the decade, as China-based firms in the cellular telephone, television, textile and automobile sectors began to establish maquiladora operations in Mexico. By 2005, there were 20-25 Chinese manufacturers operating in such Mexican states Chihuahua, Tamaulipas and Baja.

The investments were generally small, but the operations had managed to create nearly 4,000 jobs, Enrique Castro Septien, president of the Consejo Nacional de la Industria Maquiladora de Exportacion (CNIME), told the SourceMex news portal in a 2005 interview.

China’s push into Mexico became more concentrated, with China-based automakers Zhongxing Automobile Co., First Automotive Works (in partnership with Mexican retail/media heavyweight Grupo Salinas), Geely Automobile Holdings (PINK: GELYF) and ChangAn Automobile Group Co. Ltd. (the Chinese partner of Ford Motor Co. (NYSE: F) andSuzuki Motor Corp.), all announced plans to place automaking factoriesin Mexico.

Not all the plans would come to fruition. But Geely’s plan called for a three-phase project that would ultimately involve a $270 million investment and have a total annual capacity of 300,000 vehicles. ChangAn wants to churn out 50,000 vehicles a year. Both companies are taking these steps with the ultimate goal of selling cars to U.S. consumers.

Mexico’s allure as a production site that can serve the U.S. market isn’t limited to China-based suitors. U.S. companies are increasingly realizing that Mexico is a better option than China. Analysts are calling it “nearshoring” or “reverse globalization.” But the reality is this: With wages on the rise in China, ongoing worries about whipsaw energy and commodity prices, and a dollar-yuan relationship that’s destined to get much uglier before it has a chance of improving, manufacturers with an eye on the American market are increasingly realizing that Mexico trumps China in virtually every equation the producers run.

“China was like a recent graduate, hitting the job market for the first time and willing to work for next to nothing,” Mexico-manufacturing consultant German Dominguez told the Christian Science Monitor in an interview last year. But now China is experiencing “the perfect storm … it’s making Mexico – a country that had been the ugly duckling when it came to costs – look a lot better.”

The real eye opener was a 2008 speculative frenzy that sent crude oil prices up to a record level in excess of $147 a barrel – an escalation that caused shipping prices to soar. Suddenly, the labor cost advantage China enjoyed wasn’t enough to overcome the costs of shipping finished goods thousands of miles from Asia to North America. And that reality kick-started the concept of “nearshoring,” concluded an investment research report by Canadian investment bank CIBC World Markets Inc. (NYSE: CM)

“In a world of triple-digit oil prices, distance costs money,” the CIBC research analysts wrote. “And while trade liberalization and technology may have flattened the world, rising transport prices will once again make it rounder.”

Indeed, four factors are at work here.

Mexico’s “Fab Four”

  • The U.S.-Mexico Connection: There’s no question that China’s role in the post-financial-crisis world economy will continue to grow in importance. But contrary to the conventional wisdom, U.S. firms still export three times as much to Mexico as they do to China. Mexico gets 75% of its foreign direct investment from the United States, and sends 85% of its exports back across U.S. borders. As China’s cost and currency advantages dissipate, the fact that the United States and Mexico are right next to one another makes it logical to keep the factories in this hemisphere – if for no other reason that to shorten the supply chain and to hold down shipping costs. This is particularly important for companies like Johnson & Johnson (NYSE: JNJ), Whirlpool Corp. (NYSE:WHR) and even the beleaguered auto parts maker Delphi Corp. (PINK: DPHIQ) which are involved in just-in-time manufacturing that requires parts be delivered only as fast as they are needed.
  • The Lost Cost Advantage: A decade or more ago, in any discussion of manufactured product costs, Asia was hands-down the low-cost producer. That’s a given no more. Recent reports – including the analysis by AlixPartners – show that Asia’s production costs are 15% or 20% higher than they were just four years ago. A U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics report from March reaches the same conclusion. Compensation costs in East Asia – a region that includes China but excludes Japan – rose from 32% of U.S. wages in 2002 to 43% in 2007, the most recent statistics available. And since wages are advancing at a rate of 8% to 9% a year, and many types of taxes are escalating, too, East Asia’s overall costs have no doubt escalated even more in the two years since the BLS figures were reported.
  • The Creeping Currency Crisis: For the past few years, U.S. elected officials and corporate executives alike have groused that China keeps its currency artificially low to boost its exports, while also reducing U.S. imports. The U.S. trade deficit with China has soared, growing by $20.2 billion in August alone to reach $143 billion so far this year. The currency debate will be part of the discussion when U.S. President Barack Obama visits Chinastarting Monday. Because China’s yuan has strengthened so much, goods made in China may not be the bargain they once were. Those currency crosscurrents aren’t a problem with the U.S. and Mexico, however. As of Monday, the dollar was down about 15% from its March 2009 high. At the same time, however, the Mexican peso had dropped 20% versus the dollar. So while the yuan was getting stronger as the dollar got cheaper, the peso was getting even cheaper versus the dollar.
  • Trade Alliance Central: Everyone’s familiar with the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).  But not everyone understands the impact that NAFTA has had. It isn’t just window-dressing: Mexico’s trade with the United States and Canada has tripled since NAFTA was enacted in 1994. What’s more, Mexico has 12 free-trade agreements that involve more than 40 countries – more than any other country and enough to cover more than 90% of the country’s foreign trade. Its goods can be exported – duty-free – to the United States, Canada, the European Union, most of Central and Latin America, and to Japan.

In the global scheme of things, what I am telling you here probably won’t be a game-changer when it comes to China. That country is an economic juggernaut and is a market that U.S. investors cannot afford to ignore.  Given China’s emerging strength and its increasingly dominant financial position, it’s going to have its own consumer markets to service for decades to come.

Two Profit Play Candidates

From a regional standpoint, these developments all show that we’re in the earliest stages of what could be an even-closer Mexican/American relationship – enhancing the existing trade partnership in ways that benefit companies on both sides of the border (even companies that hail from other parts of the world).

In the meantime, we’ll be watching for signs of a resurgent Mexican manufacturing industry that’s ultimately driven by Chinese companies – because we know the American companies doing business with them will enjoy the fruits of their labor.

Since this is an early stage opportunity best for investors capable of stomaching some serious volatility, we’ll be watching for those Mexican companies likely to benefit from the capital that’s being newly deployed in their backyard.

Two of my favorite choices include:

  • Wal Mart de Mexico SAB de CV (OTC ADR: WMMVY): Also known as “Walmex,” this retailer has all the advantages of investing in its U.S. counterpart – albeit with a couple of twists. Walmex’s third-quarter profits were up 18% and the company just started accepting bank deposits, a service that should boost store traffic. And while the U.S. retail market is highly saturated – which limits growth opportunities – there are still plenty of places to build Walmex stores south of the border. After all, somebody has to sell products to all those thousands of workers likely to be involved in the growing maquiladora sector.
  • Coca-Cola FEMSA SAB de CV (NYSE ADR: KOF): Things truly do go better with Coke – especially higher wages and an improved lifestyle. According toReuters, Mexicans now consume more Coca-Cola beverages per capita than any other nation in the world. The company just posted a 25% jump in its third-quarter net earnings, aided by a strong 21% jump in revenue. Coca-Cola FEMSA continues to experience strong growth from its Oxxo convenience stores, and strong beer sales, too. And all three product groups are logical beneficiaries of strong maquiladora development and the growing incomes and rising family wealth that will translate into higher consumer spending in the immediately surrounding areas.

Source: Keith Fitz-Gerald is the chief investment strategist for Money Morning and The Money Map Report.

whoever is trying to bring you down

whoever is trying to bring you down

Revealing facts on Mexican Hispanics

A total of 30.7 million Hispanics of Mexican origin resided in the United States in 2008, according to the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey. Mexicans in this statistical profile are people who self-identified as Hispanics of Mexican origin or Mexican Hispanics; this means either they themselves are Mexican immigrants or they trace their family ancestry to Mexico.  Mexicans are the largest population of Hispanic origin living in the United States, accounting for nearly two-thirds (65.7%) of the U.S. Hispanic population in 2008.

1 This statistical profile compares the demographic, income and economic characteristics of the Mexican Hispanics population with the characteristics of all Hispanics and the U.S. population overall. It is based on Pew Hispanic Center tabulations of the 2008 American Community Survey. Key facts include:

Immigration status. Nearly four-in-ten Mexicans (37.0%) in the United States are foreign born, compared with 38.1% of Hispanics and 12.5% of the U.S. population overall. Most immigrants from Mexico (63.4%) arrived in the U.S. in 1990 or later. Two-in-ten of Mexican immigrants (22.0%) are U.S. citizens.

Language. A majority of Mexicans (61.6%) speak English proficiently.

2 Some 38.4% of Mexicans ages 5 and older report speaking English less than very well, compared with 37.3% of all Hispanics.

Age. Mexican Hispanics are younger than the U.S. population and Hispanics overall. The median age of Mexican Hispanics is 25; the median ages of the U.S. population and all Hispanics are 36 and 27, respectively.

Marital status. Less than half of Mexican Hispanics (48.2%) and Hispanics overall (46.5%) are married.

1 Percentages are computed before numbers are rounded.

2 Mexicans ages 5 and older who report speaking only English at home or speaking English very well.

Fertility. Thirty-eight percent of Mexican women ages 15 to 44 who gave birth in the 12 months prior to the survey were unmarried. That was similar to the rate for all Hispanic women—38.8%—but greater than the rate for U.S. women—34.5%.

Regional dispersion. Nearly four-in-ten Mexicans (36.7%) live in California, and one-in-four (25.2%) live in Texas.

Educational attainment. Mexicans have lower levels of education than the Hispanic population overall. Nine percent of Mexican Hispanics ages 25 and older—compared with 12.9% of all U.S. Hispanics—have obtained at least a bachelor’s degree.

Income. The median annual personal earnings for Mexicans ages 16 and older were $20,368 in 2008; the median earnings for all U.S. Hispanics were $21,488.

Poverty status. The share of Mexicans who live in poverty, 22.3%, is higher than the rate for the general U.S. population (12.7%) and similar to the share for all Hispanics (20.7%).

Health Insurance. One-third of Mexicans (34.8%) do not have health insurance compared with 31.7% of all Hispanics and 15.4% of the general U.S. population. Additionally, 20.4% of Mexicans younger than 18 are uninsured.

Homeownership. The rate of Mexican homeownership (50.5%) is similar to the rate for all Hispanics (49.1%) but lower than the 66.6% rate for the U.S. population as a whole.


Source: Pew Hispanic

Papatel Launches Free Phone Service Nationwide to Hispanics

Patented Technology Represents First Non-Internet Based Free Phone Service

Papatel Launches Free Phone Service Nationwide for US Hispanics

Papatel Launches Free Phone Service Nationwide for US Hispanics

Papatel, a new long-distance service that allows customers to call anywhere across the globe for free, today announced that it has launched nationwide after experiencing exponential growth during its test phase. In less than one year, Papatel has garnered more than 80,000 customers who use the service to call loved ones back home at no cost. The service is easy-to-use and takes less than five minutes to join, by logging on to www.papatel.com or calling 1-(866) PAPATEL.

Enrique Baiz, Founder and President of Papatel, commented; “many of us have families abroad, and keeping in touch with them internationally can be very costly. Particularly in this difficult economic climate, Papatel makes it free and easy to keep in touch with loved ones.”

It is so easy. Users establish an account by simply providing basic information including the numbers they will be calling from to make their long-distance calls (whether it be from the cell phone or landline) and they can start using Papatel immediately, with no strings attached. The registration, which takes less than five-minutes, is strictly confidential and the information is never shared with any other entity.

The free service is made possible through an innovative model in which advertisers place ads at the beginning of the calls and after long segments of conversation. Every week, users can acquire 1,000 free points, which allows users to call loved ones in Argentina or Mexico and talk up to 1.5 hours for free. Each time customers listen to an advertisement, they earn points, which provides them with more free long-distance minutes. Consumers can also hear weather reports or their horoscopes if they choose to.

In addition, Papatel offers users Papatel+, which is the company’s prepaid service that provides long distance rates with absolutely no advertisements. Rates to call anywhere around the world start as low as $.01. And, unlike other prepaid phone services, the balance never expires, and there are no hidden fees.

“It is the best deal a user can get for free international calls every week with no strings attached, and our prepaid and pinless international program is truly the top long-distance service in the market today,” added Baiz. “We want potential customers to know Papatel is committed to our promise, that is to offer completely free long distance service always.”

Today, Papatel has nearly 10 patents for this innovative technology, making it the world’s only free long distance service that does not require internet use. For more information or to register for the service, visit www.papatel.com, or call (866) PAPATEL.

About Papatel

Papatel is the world’s first non-internet based free phone service. Based in Miami, FL, the company currently has over 80,000 users in its first year of operation, and is rapidly expanding nationwide. For more information, visit www.papatel.com.

SOURCE Papatel

Día de la Raza or Columbus Day?

Día de la Raza - Columbus Day

Día de la Raza – Columbus Day

What do you really know about Día de la Raza? Where was it first celebrated? Why Raza and Columbus Day? How do they celebrate it in Spain? Read on and find out.

The date of Columbus’ arrival in the Americas is celebrated in many countries in Latin America, although not in Brazil, (and in some Latino communities in the United States) as the Día de la Raza (“day of the race or breed”), commemorating the first encounters of Europeans and Native Americans. The day was first celebrated in Argentina in 1917, Venezuela in 1921, Chile in 1922, and Mexico in 1928. The day was also celebrated under this title in Spain until 1957, when it was changed to the Día de la Hispanidad (“Hispanicity Day”), and in Venezuela until 2002, when it was changed to the Día de la Resistencia Indígena (Day of Indigenous Resistance) by President Hugo Chavez. Día de la Raza in many countries is seen as a counter to Columbus Day. It is used to resist the arrival of Europeans to the Americas and is used to celebrate the native races.

Día de la Raza in the U.S.

In the U.S. Día de la Raza has served as a time of mobilization for pan-ethnic Latino activists, particularly in the 1960s. Since then, La Raza has served as a periodic rallying cry for Hispanic activists. The first Hispanic March on Washington occurred on Columbus Day in 1996. The name has remained in the largest Hispanic social justice organization, the National Council of La Raza.

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Thought of the Day

small minds

small minds

Levelup.com Breaks the Alexa Top 2,000 Sites in the World

Busca Corp announced today that on Sunday July 19th Levelup.com —www.levelup.com) our flagship site and an integral part of the Busca Corp Network — has cracked Alexa’s Top 2,000 sites in the world. With over 10 million total network page views, Levelup.com has transformed into one of the top sites in Mexico and Latin America.

“The growth of Levelup.com is a testament to the 60 Billion Dollar Video Game market,” says Ramon Toledo, President of Busca Corp Media Network. “Through our partnership with Prodigy MSN we are well positioned as the #1 Video Game Site for the Latin American and U.S. Hispanic audience.”

Prodigy MSN is the most popular website in Mexico with over 23 million users and features a wide array of world-class services, such as Windows Live Hotmail, Windows Live Messenger, as well as video, news, and the latest in entertainment, lifestyle and sports. Our partnership aims to target the rapidly expanding video game user base which in the 1980’s meant mostly males under the age of 20 but today includes both male and female gamers under the age of 35.

Levelup.com publishes user-generated video game content alongside professionally produced media content that offers tips, strategies, reviews, comments and a place to share experiences with a fully engaged online community. With its unique platform, Levelup.com has experienced strong and steady growth since its launch in 2007.

Levelup.com also recently entered, and is aggressively attacking, the U.S. Hispanic Market and, is opening a largely untapped demographic with huge potential.

Source: Busca Corp

Targeting Latin Americans

Wyncrest’s Insurance and Financial Division to Rapidly Expand Into Latin American Market

The Wyncrest Group, Inc., a niche insurance consortium, announces its position to rapidly enter the Latin American market. Wyncrest’s pending acquisition of Florida Insurance Consulting Inc. will provide an important key to our growth in the Latin American markets. With the huge growth of the Spanish speaking population in the U.S., many markets are underrepresented and many families and businesses need an insurance and financial services provider.

As recently stated in our previous press release, Southwest Financial Group has been in talks with other Insurance and Financial services companies in Broward Country, Florida that could bring the number of agents in Florida to well over one hundred. This company is also doing roughly $120,000,000.00 in premium insurance and financial sales per year. The company hopes to continue its efforts in recruiting agents and associates from strong family backgrounds with ties to the Latin American communities, Cuba and elsewhere in the Caribbean, as well as South America.

Keith Lanzara, President of the Wyncrest Group, pointed out, “America is more Latin than ever before, and the language and cultural differences that exist must be overcome if Wyncrest Group’s growth strategy in the Latin insurance industry is to be successful. Wyncrest Group’s subsidiary Southwest Financial Group welcomes the opportunity to form synergies with Florida Insurance Consulting and to develop additional business in the Latin American community.”

Targeting Latin Americans

This demographic seems to be the most sought after by insurers. Hispanics represent the largest minority group in the United States with 44.3 million or 14.8% of the population. Latin Americans are also the fastest growing minority group and account for nearly half (1.4 million) the national population growth from 2005 to 2006. In U.S. history, there has never been an immigrant group that has grown to its current size while continuing to maintain its language, cultural values and traditions This makes Latin Americans a sizeable target for marketers in all industries.

The relatively young Hispanic population, entering the workforce for the first time or moving up their individual career ladders, are seeking additional gains in buying power. This will be even more important in this decade than in the 1990s. The increasing number of Latin Americans who have successfully started and expanded their own businesses is another potent force powering the growth of this consumer market, as evidenced by the 1.2 million Hispanic-owned firms in the U.S.

Health insurance providers and hospitals have traveled online to help build their brands with Latino audiences. At the same time tax preparation and accounting services continues to grow when it comes to the total dollars invested in Spanish-language media.

Source: Wyncrest