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How Young Latinos Come of Age in America

Hispanics are the largest and youngest minority group in the United States. One- in-five schoolchildren is Hispanic. One-in-four newborns is Hispanic. Never before in this country’s history has a minority ethnic group made up so large a share of the youngest Americans. By force of numbers alone, the kinds of adults these young Latinos become will help shape the kind of society America becomes in the 21st century.

This report takes an in-depth look at Hispanics who are ages 16 to 25, a phase of life when young people make choices that — for better and worse — set their path to adulthood. For this particular ethnic group, it is also a time when they navigate the intricate, often porous borders between the two cultures they inhabit — American and Latin American.

The report explores the attitudes, values, social behaviors, family characteristics, economic well-being, educational attainment and labor force outcomes of these young Latinos. It is based on a new Pew Hispanic Center telephone survey of a nationally representative sample of 2,012 Latinos, supplemented by the Pew Hispanic Center’s analysis of government demographic, economic, education and health data sets.

The data paint a mixed picture. Young Latinos are satisfied with their lives, optimistic about their futures and place a high value on education, hard work and career success. Yet they are much more likely than other American youths to drop out of school and to become teenage parents. They are more likely than white and Asian youths to live in poverty. And they have high levels of exposure to gangs.

These are attitudes and behaviors that, through history, have often been associated with the immigrant experience. But most Latino youths are not immigrantsTwo-thirds were born in the United States, many of them descendants of the big, ongoing wave of Latin American immigrants who began coming to this country around 1965.

As might be expected, they do better than their foreign-born counterparts on many key economic, social and acculturation indicators analyzed in this report. They are much more proficient in English and are less likely to drop out of high school, live in poverty or become a teen parent.

But on a number of other measures, U.S.-born Latino youths do no better than the foreign born. And on some fronts, they do worse.

For example, native-born Latino youths are about twice as likely as the foreign born to have ties to a gang or to have gotten into a fight or carried a weapon in the past year. They are also more likely to be in prison.

The picture becomes even more murky when comparisons are made among youths who are first generation (immigrants themselves), second generation (U.S.-born children of immigrants) and third and higher generation (U.S.-born grandchildren or more far-removed descendants of immigrants).1

For example, teen parenthood rates and high school drop-out rates are much lower among the second generation than the first, but they appear higher among the third generation than the second. The same is true for poverty rates.

Identity and Assimilation

Throughout this nation’s history, immigrant assimilation has always meant something more than the sum of the sorts of economic and social measures outlined above. It also has a psychological dimension. Over the course of several generations, the immigrant family typically loosens its sense of identity from the old country and binds it to the new.

It is too soon to tell if this process will play out for today’s Hispanic immigrants and their offspring in the same way it did for the European immigrants of the 19th and early 20th centuries. But whatever the ultimate trajectory, it is clear that many of today’s Latino youths, be they first or second generation, are straddling two worlds as they adapt to the new homeland.

According to the Pew Hispanic Center’s National Survey of Latinos, more than half (52%) of Latinos ages 16 to 25 identify themselves first by their family’s country of origin, be it Mexico, Cuba, the Dominican Republican, El Salvador or any of more than a dozen other Spanish-speaking countries. An additional 20% generally use the terms “Hispanic” or “Latino” first when describing themselves. Only about one-in-four (24%) generally use the term “American” first.

Among the U.S.-born children of immigrants, “American” is somewhat more commonly used as a primary term of self-identification. Even so, just 33% of these young second generation Latinos use American first, while 21% refer to themselves first by the terms Hispanic or Latino, and the plurality — 41% — refer to themselves first by the country their parents left in order to settle and raise their children in this country.

Only in the third and higher generations do a majority of Hispanic youths (50%) use “American” as their first term of self-description.

Immigration in Historical Perspective

Measured in raw numbers, the modern Latin American-dominated immigration wave is by far the largest in U.S. history. Nearly 40 million immigrants have come to the United States since 1965. About half are from Latin America, a quarter from Asia and the remainder from Europe, Canada, the Middle East and Africa. By contrast, about 14 million immigrants came during the big Northern and Western European immigration wave of the 19th century and about 18 million came during the big Southern and Eastern European-dominated immigration wave of the early 20th century.2

However, the population of the United States was much smaller during those earlier waves. When measured against the size of the U.S. population during the period when the immigration occurred, the modern wave’s average annual rate of 4.6 new immigrants per 1,000 population falls well below the 7.7 annual rate that prevailed in the mid- to late 19th century and the 8.8 rate at the beginning of the 20th century.

All immigration waves produce backlashes of one kind or another, and the latest one is no exception. Illegal immigration, in particular, has become a highly-charged political issue in recent times. It is also a relatively new phenomenon; past immigration waves did not generate large numbers of illegal immigrants because the U.S. imposed fewer restrictions on immigration flow in the past than it does now.

The current wave may differ from earlier waves in other ways as well. More than a few immigration scholars have voiced skepticism that the children and grandchildren of today’s Hispanic immigrants will enjoy the same upward mobility experienced by the offspring of European immigrants in previous centuries.3

Their reasons vary, and not all are consistent with one another. Some scholars point to structural changes in modern economies that make it more difficult for unskilled laborers to climb into the middle class. Some say the illegal status of so many of today’s immigrants is a major obstacle to their upward mobility. Some say the close proximity of today’s sending countries and the relative ease of modern global communication reduce the felt need of immigrants and their families to acculturate to their new country. Some say the fatalism of Latin American cultures is a poor fit in a society built on Anglo-Saxon values. Some say that America’s growing tolerance for cultural diversity may encourage modern immigrants and their offspring to retain ethnic identities that were seen by yesterday’s immigrants as a handicap. (The melting pot is dead. Long live the salad bowl.) Alternatively, some say that Latinos’ brown skin makes assimilation difficult in a country where white remains the racial norm.

It will probably take at least another generation’s worth of new facts on the ground to know whether these theories have merit. But it is not too soon to take some snapshots and lay down some markers. This report does so by assembling a wide range of empirical evidence (some generated by our own new survey; some by our analysis of government data) and subjecting it to a series of comparisons: between Latinos and non-Latinos; between young Latinos and older Latinos; between foreign-born Latinos and native-born Latinos; and between first, second, and third and higher generations of Latinos.

The generational analyses presented here do not compare the outcomes of individual Latino immigrants with those of their own children or grandchildren. Instead, our generational analysis compares today’s young Latino immigrants with today’s children and grandchildren of yesterday’s immigrants. As such, the report can provide some insights into the intergenerational mobility of an immigrant group over time. But it cannot fully disentangle the many factors that may help explain the observed patterns-be they compositional effects (the different skills, education levels and other forms of human capital that different cohorts of immigrants bring) or period effects (the different economic conditions that confront immigrants in different time periods).

Readers should be especially careful when interpreting findings about the third and higher generation, for this is a very diverse group. We estimate that about 40% are the grandchildren of Latin American immigrants, while the remainder can trace their roots in this country much farther back in time.

For some in this mixed group, endemic poverty and its attendant social ills have been a part of their families, barrios and colonias for generations, even centuries. Meantime, others in the third and higher generation have been upwardly mobile in ways consistent with the generational trajectories of European immigrant groups. Because the data we use in this report do not allow us to separate out the different demographic sub-groups within the third and higher generation, the overall numbers we present are averages that often mask large variances within this generation.

Source: Pew Hispanic Center

SABEResPODER & Best Buy Promote Informed Shopping Decisions

The initiative aims at educating the Latino community on how best to take advantage of the technology at their reach.

Best Buy unites with SABEResPODER to educate the Hispanic community about how to get the most out of the latest technology and understand their rights as consumers.

Various studies show that Latinos purchase more televisions, digital cameras, cell phones, and computers than the average population. However, Raul P. Lomeli-Azoubel, Executive Chairman for SABEResPODER, said that, “the statistics also reveal a different reality: the technological advances, that serve to make our lives easier, are not being used to their full potential.”

For this reason, SABEResPODER, with Best Buy’s support, has published an educational guide about “New Technologies” with the main objective of sharing vital information, so that consumers can learn more about their options.

The educational campaign also includes an informative video on the subject and workshops that will be offered to community groups. The goal of the initiative is to promote smarter, more informed, consumer electronic shopping, and help the community purchase products that actually meet their specific needs.

“Our knowledgeable, non-commission sales specialists are trained specifically to help our customers find the right product solution to best fit their individual needs,” says Marco Orozco from Best Buy. “We believe our sales specialists’ primary role is to listen to the needs of our customers and then inform and educate them on their product options.”

The initiative was presented during a community event at the Mexican Consulate in Los Angeles, where Consul General Juan Marcos Gutierrez congratulated SABEResPODER for this campaign focused on educating the community and empowering them to make informed purchasing decisions. The Consul General also made the following recommendation to the audience: “remember to first educate yourself on your options in order to avoid mistakes that are caused by impulse shopping.”

The recurring theme at the event was for consumers to make informed purchases to ensure that technology delivers on its promises; and to learn how technology can improve the quality of life in a digital world.

About SABEResPODER, Inc.

SABEResPODER provides corporations, agencies and non-profit entities with powerful and exclusive educational media solutions for gaining incremental customers while assisting Spanish-dominant consumers to become more informed, confident and active consumers and participants in American society. SABEResPODER is a targeted Spanish-language multimedia network reaching Spanish dominant consumers at a key transition point when they are actively pursuing resources to further establish their lives in the United States. For more information about SABEResPODER, visit www.saberespoder.com.

About Best Buy Co., Inc.

With operations in the United States, Canada, Europe, China and Mexico, Best Buy is a multinational retailer of technology and entertainment products and services with a commitment to growth and innovation. Approximately 155,000 employees apply their talents to help bring the benefits of these brands to life for customers through retail locations, multiple call centers and Web sites, in-home solutions, product delivery and activities in our communities. Community partnership is central to the way we do business at Best Buy. In fiscal 2009, Best Buy donated a combined $33.4 million to improve the vitality of the communities where their employees and customers live and work. For more information about Best Buy, visit www.bestbuy.com


SOURCE SABEResPODER

Hispanic Scholarship Fund P&G Pledges $1.5MM

Scholarship applications now available until Feb. 2010

Procter & Gamble (P&G) and the Hispanic Scholarship Fund (HSF) are pleased to announce that P&G is awarding $1.5 million under the company’s Live, Learn and Thrive(TM) global cause to support HSF, the leading Hispanic organization devoted to awarding university scholarships. The grant will be provided over the next four years to support scholarships to increase participation from Hispanics in the STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) areas, as well as sponsoring educational outreach programs.

This contribution will help award 192, $2,500 scholarships to eligible Hispanic students nationwide in the next four years. Thanks to the support of companies like Procter & Gamble, the Hispanic Scholarship Fund has given over 90,000 scholarships to students in need worth over $250 million in the past 34 years. Two-thirds of these students were the first in their families to go to college.

“Through the Live, Learn and Thrive Scholarship program, P&G is enabling a cadre of academically talented, low income, first in family to attend college students complete an important new step in realizing the American dream. And, by focusing on STEM majors, P&G is strategically investing in future career paths destined to assure continued success and leadership of our country in this ever competitive global economy. We salute P&G and the scholars!” said Frank D. Alvarez, HSF President and CEO.

While Hispanics are the largest ethnic minority in the United States, they unfortunately are not keeping up when it comes to educational attainment: according to HSF, Latinos have the lowest high school and college completion rates of any racial or ethnic group, registering a 23.8 percent high school dropout rate, the highest of any major racial or ethnic group (ages 16 to 24), compared to 7 percent for non-Hispanic whites. Moreover, as per data from the Census report Educational Attainment in the United States: 2008, out of the total population, only 13 percent of Hispanics 25 and older have a bachelor’s degree, as per data from the report.

In addition, data from the study, “Confronting the ‘New’ American Dilemma, Underrepresented Minorities in Engineering: A Data-Based Look at Diversity,” from the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering (NACME) reveals that the number of minority students pursuing STEM degrees and careers has flattened out or even declined in recent years: out of the 6,404 doctoral degrees in engineering awarded in 2006, only 98 went to Latinos and Latinas.

Following its commitment to advance the Hispanic community, P&G has been a long-standing corporate partner of HSF for over 30 years and has donated more than $3,000,000 to help educate future Hispanic leaders. Under its global Live, Learn and Thrive(TM) cause, P&G aims to contribute to the success of Hispanic students and even make higher education a more realistic goal by helping build a pool of exceptional talent and empowering possible future employees, who will continue to enhance the company’s dedication to cater to the needs of its consumers.

“At P&G, we believe in having a workforce and business partners that reflect the markets and consumers that we serve, and to fully value and learn from all of their experiences, insights and talents so we can meaningfully improve the lives of our communities. As part of our efforts to improve life for children and youth, we’re proud to make this Live, Learn and Thrive(TM) grant in recognition of the programs HSF delivers on behalf of Hispanic students,” said Edgar Sandoval, P&G’s General Manager, North America Marketing.

Sandoval, a former recipient of an HSF scholarship while he was pursuing his engineering degree, was inducted into the prestigious Hispanic Scholarship Fund (HSF) Alumni Hall of Fame as the “Inspirador” (the motivator), in recognition of his personal achievements and the hard work and sacrifice made in pursuit of a college education. His scholastic success testifies to the great positive impact that an HSF scholarship can have in a student’s life.

This year’s Alumni Hall of Fame Gala took place in New York on Sept. 30th, and was hosted by Natalie Morales, NBC’s “Today” Co-Host and National Correspondent. Created in 2002, the HSF Alumni Hall of Fame honors Hispanics who demonstrate the power of higher education and highlights how attaining a college degree can change individual lives and society as a whole for the better. As an inductee, Sandoval will join a select group of Latino professionals who have been recognized, including former Surgeon General Richard Carmona, U.S. Ambassador to Mexico Tony Garza and Time Warner Vice President Lisa Quiroz.

HSF’s scholarship application period is now open and will run until Feb. 28th, 2010. General application requirements include having a minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA and be pursuing or planning to pursue their first undergraduate or graduate program. For more information on how to apply for these scholarships, please visit www.hsf.net

About the Hispanic Scholarship Fund

Founded in 1975 as a not-for-profit, the Hispanic Scholarship Fund (HSF) is the nation’s preeminent Latino scholarship organization, providing the Latino community more college scholarships and educational outreach support than any other organization in the country. During the 2007-2008 academic year, HSF awarded almost 4,100 scholarships exceeding $26.7 million. In its 33-year history, HSF has awarded in excess of 86,000 scholarships, worth more than $247 million, to Latinos attending nearly 2,000 colleges and universities in all 50 states, Puerto Rico, Guam and the U.S. Virgin Islands. For a scholarship application or more information about HSF, please visit: WWW.HSF.NET.

About Procter & Gamble and Live, Learn and Thrive.

Three billion times a day, P&G brands touch the lives of people around the world. The company has one of the strongest portfolios of trusted, quality, leadership brands, including Pampers®, Tide®, Ariel®, Always®, Whisper®, Pantene®, Mach3®, Bounty®, Dawn®, Gain®, Pringles®, Charmin®, Downy®, Lenor®, Iams®, Crest®, Oral-B®, Duracell®, Olay®, Head & Shoulders®, Wella®, Gillette®, Braun® and Fusion®. The P&G community includes approximately 138,000 employees working in over 80 countries worldwide. In these countries and beyond, P&G is committed to improving lives for children in need through its global cause, Live, Learn and Thrive. Every day P&G Live, Learn and Thrive(TM) is helping children get off to a healthy start, receive access to education, and build skills for life. Please visit http://www.pg.com for the latest news and in-depth information about P&G, its brands, and Live, Learn and Thrive.

SOURCE Procter & Gamble

1st-Ever Sears National Hispanic Heritage Month Initiative

Introduces new bilingual social networking site for students and parents

HOFFMAN ESTATES, Ill., Sept. 15 /PRNewswire/ — Inspired by the many Hispanic families who help their children become the first to attend college, Sears Holdings has launched the PRIMERO Hispanic Heritage Scholarship(SM) and bilingual, social networking education website in celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month (September 15 – October 15).

In Spanish, “primero” means “first”. The PRIMERO scholarship awards up to $10,000 toward college costs for those who are “first” in their family to attend college, as well as those continuing the family’s tradition of attaining a higher education. In addition to applying for the scholarship, students and their parents can also learn about the college planning process via the PRIMERO Hispanic Heritage Scholarship(SM) site — www.shcprimerobeca.com. SHC also offers a scholarship to associates of Sears, Kmart, Lands’ End and Orchard Supply Hardware.

With more than 46 million Hispanics now living in the U.S. and more than 132 million expected by 2050*, the PRIMERO Hispanic Heritage Scholarship(SM) education initiative is one of the ways Sears Holdings is reaching out to the Hispanic community. Sears recently launched a fully Spanish-translated website, espanol.sears.com, giving Spanish-speaking customers full access to its wide range of home appliances, electronics and computers, outdoor living, lawn and garden, and tools. Product names and navigation are also translated in other categories, allowing our customers to browse our websites in whichever language best meets their needs.

“We are excited to launch the SHC PRIMERO Hispanic Heritage Scholarship(SM) and education website in honor of Hispanic Heritage Month,” said Nydia J. Sahagun, director, multicultural marketing, Sears Holdings Corporation. “This new initiative is a great way to support education, while providing information and resources for college-bound students and their parents in an engaging and interactive way.”

*2009 U.S. Census Bureau

The PRIMERO Hispanic Heritage Scholarship(SM) website is Sears Holdings’ first corporate social networking site focused on education. The website is a one-stop online destination for college planning, featuring special sections to demystify the process:

— Why College – Outlines the benefits of going to college while busting myths versus facts about college

— The Plan – Tells you what to do first to start planning for college, no matter where you are in the process

— The Search – Details the types of colleges you can choose from while helping you find a match with the type of college that best fits you

— The Process – Gives you a monthly “to-do” list, checklist and information on college application requirements and on how to apply

— The Money – Provides information on typical tuition costs and how to navigate through financial aid

— At College – Offers tips for success once in college

— Blogs – Give first-hand tips from real college students on what to expect when applying for or attending college

According to Diverseeducation.com, although 98% of Hispanic high school students want to attend college, only 25% of college-aged Hispanics (18-24) are enrolled. This low attendance rate is attributed to many factors including lack of experience, resources and available/understandable information in many Hispanic communities. The PRIMERO Hispanic Heritage Scholarship(SM) and website aims to close the informational gap for Hispanics.

“We commend Sears Holdings for providing scholarship opportunities, especially during a time when a large emerging population is primarily Hispanic,” said Antonio Flores, president and CEO of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU). “The reality is that without programs like PRIMERO Hispanic Heritage Scholarship(SM), attaining a higher education would not be possible for many Hispanics.

No purchase is necessary. Void in Maine and where prohibited. High school and college students from all ethnic backgrounds who are residents of the 50 United States (except ME), plus the District of Columbia, and are between the ages of 16 and 22, inclusive with a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale (or the equivalent) are encouraged to apply for the PRIMERO Hispanic Heritage Scholarship(SM). Awards include a scholarship for college worth up to $10,000 (1 winner), up to $5,000 (1 winner) or up to $2,500 (2 winners), or one of 10 Sears-Kmart ‘Back to Campus” kits, valued at $250 each. Entries must be received or postmarked by October 15, 2009, at 11:59 p.m. EST. For Official Rules, go to www.shcprimerobeca.com/es/apply-now/rules (Spanish) or www.shcprimerobeca.com/en/apply-now/rules (English). For more information on the PRIMERO Hispanic Heritage Scholarship(SM) or college preparation, visit www.shcprimerobeca.com. For more information on Sears and Kmart, visit www.sears.com or www.kmart.com. Sponsor: Sears Holdings Corporation, 3333 Beverly Road, Hoffman Estates, IL 60179.

About Sears Holdings Corporation

Sears Holdings Corporation is the nation’s fourth largest broadline retailer with approximately 3,900 full-line and specialty retail stores in the United States and Canada. Sears Holdings is the leading home appliance retailer as well as a leader in tools, lawn and garden, home electronics and automotive repair and maintenance. Key proprietary brands include Kenmore, Craftsman and DieHard, and a broad apparel offering, including such well-known labels as Lands’ End, Jaclyn Smith and Joe Boxer, as well as the Apostrophe and Covington brands. It also has Martha Stewart Everyday products, which are offered exclusively in the U.S. by Kmart. We are the nation’s largest provider of home services, with more than 12 million service calls made annually. Sears Holdings Corporation operates through its subsidiaries, including Sears, Roebuck and Co. and Kmart Corporation. For more information, visit Sears Holdings’ website at www.searsholdings.com.

Source: Sears Holdings Corporation

Snacking differences between Hispanics, general population

Snacking Differences: Hispanic Parents More Likely to Reward Kids with Snacks

Study highlights snacking differences between Hispanics, general population

Study highlights snacking differences between Hispanics, general population

Dipped, topped or eaten plain, America loves snacks. But new research from Mintel shows that not all Americans snack the same. Hispanics, the fastest growing population in the US, differ significantly in their snacking habits.

Hispanic adults are twice as likely as non-Hispanics to reward their children’s good behavior with salty snacks (41% versus 19%). But salty snack consumption among Hispanic adults is low, possibly due to traditional food preferences. Of five snacks-potato chips, pretzels, popcorn, nuts and corn/tortilla chips/cheese snacks-only 65% of Hispanics report eating three or more regularly (versus 80% of the general population).

Other key snacking differences findings

  • Hispanics emphasize mealtime, with snacks often perceived as appetite-spoilers. Mintel found Hispanics more interested in packages with ’small portions’ than the general population
  • Frozen snack usage is extremely low among less acculturated Hispanics, but more acculturated Hispanics eat them at the same rate as other Americans
  • Hispanic children show higher preference for healthy snacks like yogurt, cheese, raw veggies and nuts than non-Hispanic children

’Manufacturers need to understand that Hispanic’s eating habits are not the same as the general population’s,’ explains Leylha Ahuile, multicultural expert at Mintel. ’Even among Hispanics, we see huge variety in snacking, eating and drinking tendencies.’ Ahuile emphasizes the importance of not viewing Hispanics as one homogenous group. ’Understanding acculturation and how Hispanics differ from one another is key for companies hoping to tap into this rapidly growing market.’

Source: http://www.mintel.com

Characteristics of Hispanic Millennials

Characteristics of Hispanic Millennials

Characteristics of Hispanic Millennials

In terms of population size, Millennials are already reshaping the ethnic makeup of the Unites States. According to recent figures from the 2008 Current Population Survey, 44 percent of those born since the beginning of the 80’s belong to some racial or ethnic category other than “non-Hispanic white”. Millennials are revealing themselves to be the demographic precursor to Census Bureau projections showing whites as a minority by 2050: only 56 percent of Millennials are white (non-Hispanic) and only 28 percent of current Baby Boomers who are non-white. Therefore we can say that the younger the group, the higher the proportion of “ethnic” populations.

Characteristics of the Hispanic Millennials

Hispanics are at the forefront of this Millennial diversity:

  • - over 20 percent of Millennials are Hispanics
  • - approximately 86 percent of Hispanics under the age of 18 are born in the U.S. (95 percent of Millennials are U.S. born)
  • - many Hispanic Millennials are the offspring of immigrants
  • - unlike their immigrant parents, this group strongly exhibits a preference for English as their primary mode of communication – this poses an interesting challenge when targeting this group because of the importance of family opinions
  • - 88 percent of second generation Hispanics and 94 percent of third generation Hispanics are highly English fluent (speak “very well”). Many second generation Hispanics tend to be bilingual, but English dominates by the third generation. (Source: Pew Hispanic Center)
    A distinguishing characteristic of multi-ethnic Millennials is their heavily “second generation” orientation (nearly 30 percent are children of immigrants). Since they are more likely children of immigrants than immigrants themselves, the proportion of foreign born Millennials is relatively small when compared to Generation Xers and Baby Boomers. Foreign-born persons comprise 13 percent of all Millennials (includes all those born since the 80s), but they make up 22 percent of the Generation X cohort (born between 1965 to 1979) and 16 percent of Baby Boomers (born between 1946 and 1964).

Hispanics born in the U.S. can be grouped into two distinct marketing segments:

a- the young “millennial” Latinos, children, teens, and young adults born to immigrant parents

b- “traditional Latinos” or those born to Latino families that have been U.S. citizens for two or more generations

The first ones know how to live in both cultures and enjoy doing so. For the second segment, and depending on the market, the levels of value orientation and acculturation vary drastically.  They may be far removed from the Latino culture or their identity as Hispanics can be much more traditional and stronger than expected.

Perhaps more astounding is the casual mix-and-match cultural sensibilities of Millennials. Not content to cleave to any single ethnic or cultural influence, they are free to engage in the variety with no restrictions. One example is “Mashups”—entire compositions reconfigured from samples drawn from disparate musical genres—so popular on mp3 players. Millennial choices in popular culture are drawn from a broad pool of influences, and anything can be customized and suited to one’s personal preferences—just as easily as an iPod playlist. Likewise, the aesthetics of Millennial fashion, movies, and video games increasingly reflect a broad range of influences—from Japanese anime to East L.A. graffiti art.
Today’s young consumer shun direct overtures aimed at appealing to their ethnic background and they tend to discard traditional cultural labels in favor of their own self-created monikers like “Mexipino”, “Blaxican”, “China Latina”.

As a market segment, Millennials are shaking the foundations of advertising and media. Enabled by technology, their lifestyle is characterized by instant text messaging, mobile media, and virtual social networking. Millennials Hispanics are 211% more likely to download content from the Internet than the general population. Over 60% of Hispanic Millennials are online.
Downloads just might be the manner in which Hispanics are attaining and interacting with certain brands for the first time. For example, downloading may be a preferred method to receive media content including local and national news. This is exemplary of a larger phenomena occurring across the youth culture, as people in younger age brackets go online for content typically associated with more ‘traditional’ media, such as movies or television.  Media content providers and marketers have an opportunity to leverage downloading habits and create content that engages Hispanic Millennials and other Hispanics online.

by Claudia “Havi” Goffan

Adult Vaccination Levels Lag

Young Adults Unaware of Threat of Infectious Disease and the Availability of Preventive Vaccines

Experts Call for Increased Awareness and Vaccination Rates Among All Adults

CDC Unveils New Vaccination Data Showing Continuing Need to Improve Rates

Young adults may have grown up in an era of information overload, but they have alarmingly little awareness of the risks of vaccine-preventable diseases and the need to keep up with vaccinations into adulthood, new data show.

For example, 84 percent of Americans over the age of 50 know that tetanus causes lockjaw and that they need to get a tetanus shot every 10 years. By contrast, just 49 percent of young adults aged 18 to 26 are aware of that fact, according to a survey commissioned by the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID).

“Unless all adults, and young adults in particular, get more savvy and keep up with recommended immunizations, the nation could be vulnerable to outbreaks of vaccine-preventable disease down the road,” warned William Schaffner, MD, president-elect of NFID and chairman of the Department of Preventive Medicine at Vanderbilt University, at a news conference attended by top U.S. public health officials and other medical experts. All underscored the importance of vaccination throughout the lifespan of an individual, not just in childhood.

Experts say that overall lack of awareness and knowledge among adults runs parallel to lower vaccination levels. According to the latest National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) released by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), while we are seeing positive movement in some adult vaccination levels, rates still lag behind national targets across the board.

“Just as we prioritize protecting children with vaccines, we must also prioritize vaccination of adults as part of optimal preventive care,” said Assistant U.S. Surgeon General and director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases Anne Schuchat, MD. “Adult immunization saves lives, prevents illness and will help us rein in the cost of healthcare by keeping the nation healthy.”

NFID’s medical director, Susan J. Rehm, MD, vice chair of the Department of Infectious Disease at the Cleveland Clinic, unveiled the NFID survey data showing that fewer than half of all American adults are “extremely or very familiar” with a number of vaccine-preventable diseases that can cause severe illness or death. To highlight this, just 20 percent of those surveyed were aware of pneumococcal disease, a vaccine-preventable disease that kills up to 4,500 adults in the U.S. every year.

Of special concern, experts said, is the lack of knowledge and awareness among young adults aged 18 to 26. For example, just 30 percent of young adults know that flu, which can be prevented with a vaccine, kills more Americans than any other vaccine-preventable disease. By contrast, 59 percent of adults over the age of 50 are aware of that fact, the survey found.

“This pattern is not surprising,” said Dr. Rehm. “Our childhood vaccination program is so successful that adolescents cross into young adulthood having been extremely well protected against vaccine-preventable diseases and therefore have little or no personal experience with them. This may signal trouble in the future. As these young adults go on to have their own families, if they don’t realize the importance of getting vaccinated for themselves, they may not prioritize it for their children either. That could make outbreaks of many vaccine-preventable diseases possible again.”

NFID, which has long advocated for optimal use of all vaccines recommended by public health officials, has embarked on a campaign to raise public awareness about the need for adults – including young adults – to keep up with immunizations after childhood. (For a list of diseases and vaccines, go to www.adultvaccination.org.)

Adult Vaccination Levels Lag

The latest data from CDC show that there are still too few Americans taking advantage of vaccines recommended to protect them from infectious diseases. Influenza and pneumococcal vaccination levels remain at 66.6 percent and 60 percent, respectively, for those over age 65. Other adult vaccination levels are lower – 6.7 percent for shingles in those 60 and older; about 10 percent for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in women 19 to 26 years of age and about 15 percent for Tdap in those 19 to 64 years of age.

It should be noted that Tdap booster is recommended in place of one tetanus-diphtheria (Td) booster vaccine, which is recommended every 10 years. Since Tdap has only been licensed since June 10, 2005, a substantial portion of the population has not yet reached the 10-year timing milestone since their last Td vaccine. The coverage level for any Td-containing vaccine is 64 percent for those 19 to 49 years of age, 63 percent for those 50 to 64 years of age and 52 percent for those 65 and older.

While influenza and pneumococcal vaccination levels are highest and have remained somewhat steady, these rates are disappointing, because influenza and pneumococcal vaccines have long been a part of the adult schedule and the coverage goal is 90 percent. Also of concern are racial and ethnic disparities in coverage levels in people 65 and older. Influenza coverage level in non-Hispanic whites in this age group is above the national average at 69 percent, while the rates for non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanic persons 65-plus are well below at 53 percent and 51 percent, respectively. Similarly, for pneumococcal disease, whites 65-plus have higher coverage levels than non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics at 64 percent, 44 percent and 36 percent, respectively.

“Immunity is a lifetime continuum and should be the goal for all adults as part of good preventive care and wellness,” said Dr. Schuchat. “We need to make a strong, long-term commitment to adult immunization as a nation if we are to realize the full benefits of the many vaccines available to us.”

While the NFID-sponsored survey found that most adults were very familiar with flu and chickenpox, both of which can be prevented by vaccines, it found that most adults were not very familiar with a host of other infectious diseases that can be prevented with vaccines. In addition to pneumococcal disease, these include shingles, hepatitis B, pertussis and HPV, which causes cervical cancer.

Although young adults were more likely than older adults to be very familiar with HPV and pneumococcal disease, they were much less likely than older adults to be aware of the threat from other vaccine-preventable diseases.

Physicians Have Most Influence Over Whether Adults Are Vaccinated

The survey found that personal physicians had the most influence on whether adults are aware of vaccine-preventable diseases and whether they keep up with their vaccinations, and that people who get annual physical exams are more likely to be vaccinated than those who don’t visit their doctor every year.

At the news conference, Stanley A. Gall, MD, professor of obstetrics, gynecology and women’s health at the University of Louisville, said that OB-GYN doctors could play an important role in making sure that the women they see are up-to-date with vaccinations. “Women may not only make better decisions about their own immunity based on input from an OB-GYN, but they may also bring immunization messages home to other family members,” he said.

Robert H. Hopkins, MD, associate professor at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, called for stepped-up attention to the fact that adults need to take a more active role in good preventive care, which includes getting vaccinated. “Mid-life is a time when people typically begin to face new health hazards, such as obesity and diabetes, and are therefore more vulnerable to the infectious diseases that vaccines can prevent. But even if middle-aged people are otherwise healthy, vaccines are an essential component of continued good health,” he said.

Cora L. Christian, MD, a member of AARP’s Board of Directors stressed the importance of vaccinating 50-plus Americans, particularly those who care for children and older loved ones. “The sandwich generation of Americans who may provide care for both their children and older parents are particularly vulnerable to infectious diseases,” Christian said. “It’s critical for caregivers and anyone 50-plus to get annual influenza vaccinations so they can avoid getting sick and prevent the spread of flu to their families. Just as important, people 65 and older should ask their doctor about a pneumococcal vaccine.”

The NHIS has monitored the health of the nation since 1957. NHIS 2008 data were collected through interviews with approximately 29,000 households.

The NFID survey, conducted by Opinion Research Corporation, was based on telephone interviews with 1,001 Americans aged 18 and older Feb. 19-22, 2009. The margin of error is plus or minus 3 percent.

About the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases

The National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID), a non-profit organization, has been a leading voice for education about infectious diseases and vaccination since 1973. It is dedicated to educating the public and healthcare professionals about the causes, treatment, and prevention of infectious diseases. For more information on vaccines and vaccine-preventable diseases, please visit www.nfid.org.

This news conference is sponsored by the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases and supported by unrestricted

educational grants from GlaxoSmithKline, Merck & Co., Inc., sanofi pasteur and Wyeth Pharmaceuticals.

Source: National Foundation for Infectious Diseases

GOT MILK? Summer Milkshake Recipes

GOT MILK? Partners with Acclaimed BLD Pastry Chef to Share Summer Milkshake Recipes

Personality in a cup - New Hispanic flavors

Personality in a cup – New Hispanic flavors

There’s a saying that you could tell people’s personalities based on the types of drink they enjoy. A person who likes a chocolaty beverage, for example, could be described as sweet and indulgent, while someone who likes fruity drinks could be described as carefree and fun. Pastry Chef Mariah Swan of Los Angeles-based BLD & Grace Restaurants says the same could be said for those who enjoy milkshakes. Just in time for summer parties and socials, Swan and BLD have partnered with the California Milk Processor Board (CMPB), the creator of GOT MILK? to share delicious, decadent and whimsical milkshake recipes for treat-lovers to enjoy during the hot days of the season.

“Milk is not only a healthy beverage, it’s also the base for many fun drinks like milkshakes,” says Swan, a graduate of the California School of Culinary Arts and a pastry chef at BLD for two-and-a-half years. “Drinking a milkshake brings out the kid in everyone, but each flavor highlights a person’s personality.”

Available exclusively on www.gotmilk.com/recipes, Swan has created summer milkshake recipes for those who cannot resist this good old-fashioned treat. She features one-of-a-kind milkshakes in her menu, each carefully created to bring out a unique personality. They include:

1) Blueberry Malt Milkshake – blueberry, a typical summertime fruit combined with milk and vanilla ice cream for people who are jovial and who like an unexpected twist in their drink

2) Frozen Mexican Chocolate – a decadent drink blending cocoa powder, milk, cinnamon and brownies on ice for those who do not know the word “compromise”

3) Salted Caramel Milkshake - a treat consisting of milk, vanilla ice cream, caramel sauce and salt topped with whipped cream for people who consider themselves sassy and sweet

“These milkshakes are more than a treat,” says CMPB Executive Director Steve James. “They’re an absolute delight for kids of all ages. This milkshake program is one of the ways the CMPB hopes to educate consumers about the many creative ways they can incorporate milk in their diets.”

To also catch the favorite milkshake recipes of various political, entertainment and sports personalities that include San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom, Sacramento Mayor Kevin Johnson, Los Angeles City Council President Eric Garcetti, High School Musical and Dancing with the Stars Personality Monique Coleman and San Diego Padre slugger Adrian Gonzalez, please log on to www.gotmilk.com/recipes.

Source: California Milk Processor Board

Seventeen Magazine and Bank of America Partner To Reveal Teens’ Anxieties About the Economy

Results give key insight into teens and their money worries

Latina Teens

Latina Teens

As back-to-school approaches, teens have lots on their minds – from classes to social calendars. If that weren’t enough, teens – especially girls — are also stressed out about the economy and money matters, according to a new survey from Seventeen magazine and Bank of America that explores teens’ saving and spending habits.

Most teens are stressed about money, but teen girls are feeling slightly more anxious in today’s climate than boys, with more than eight in ten girls (85%) saying they’re worried about the economy, vs. 75% of teen boys. And nearly nine of ten girls (88%) say they’re fretting about money, vs. 82% of teen boys, according to the survey.

Girls’ fears range from not having enough cash to pay for things they want — like lip gloss and mini dresses — to how to pay for college, to having money to hang out with friends. Teen girls are more likely to be stressed about college funding than teen boys, with more than two-thirds of girls (69%) saying they’re frazzled about paying for education costs, vs. 59% of teen boys.

“Teens are largely recession-proof. They are still buying clothes, beauty products and entertainment. But they can’t avoid the larger cultural anxiety about the economy,” says Seventeen editor-in-chief Ann Shoket. “It’s our job to calm their fears and help them to make smart decisions about their money so they can grow into fiscally responsible adults.”

Two out of three girls say they save some cash, but admit it’s not enough, according to the survey. Girls also say they’re better at spending than stashing, and only one in three (34%) believe they’re in total control of their finances. The Seventeen magazine and Bank of America survey also revealed that when given a choice, teen girls are more likely to choose fun over finances. Notably, if given $100 for their birthday, 55% of teen girls say they would spend it on clothes, while 45% would save it for college.

Regardless of financial anxieties, the large majority of teen girls (76%) are still optimistic about their future and their ability to support themselves as adults. More than eight in ten girls (82%) think they’ll be better off than their parents some day. Nearly two-thirds (64%) of girls says they’d rather have a career that makes a difference over one that makes a lot of money.

“Teen attitudes about spending and saving mirror what all consumers are feeling,” says Beverly Ladley, Customer Strategy Executive at Bank of America. “While their parents still largely support them, teens are interested in learning how to become more financially independent and make smarter decisions about money — and we have the opportunity to help them.”

Other findings from the survey:

  • Nearly half (45%) of teens say their parents are worrying/fighting about money more often lately.
  • Four in 10 teens (38%) have had to alter their college plans in some way because of the current economic downturn, while one in five have had to either go with their second choice of because of cost or attend a state school instead of a private one in order to save money.
  • A large portion of teens have changed their spending habits as a result of the economy (65%); this is especially true among Hispanic teens (75%).

Methodology:

The research, conducted in April, surveyed 2,000 teens in the U.S. ages 16 to 21.

ABOUT SEVENTEEN:

Seventeen reaches more than 13 million readers every month and is today’s largest selling teen beauty and fashion magazine. Seventeen is published by Hearst Magazines, a unit of Hearst Corporation (www.hearst.com) and one of the world’s largest publishers of monthly magazines, with a total of 19 U.S. titles and nearly 200 international editions. Hearst Magazines reaches more adults in the U.S. than any other publisher of monthly magazines (73.4 million according to MRI, fall 2006). The company also publishes 19 magazines in the United Kingdom through its wholly owned subsidiary, The National Magazine Company Limited.

ABOUT BANK OF AMERICA:

Bank of America is one of the world’s largest financial institutions, serving approximately 55 million consumer and small business relationships with more than 6,100 retail banking offices, more than 18,500 ATMs and award-winning online banking with nearly 30 million active users. Bank of America offers industry-leading support to more than 4 million small business owners through a suite of innovative, easy-to-use online products and services. Bank of America is among the world’s leading wealth management companies and serves clients in more than 150 countries.

Source: Hearst Magazines

Levelup.com Breaks the Alexa Top 2,000 Sites in the World

Busca Corp announced today that on Sunday July 19th Levelup.com –www.levelup.com) our flagship site and an integral part of the Busca Corp Network — has cracked Alexa’s Top 2,000 sites in the world. With over 10 million total network page views, Levelup.com has transformed into one of the top sites in Mexico and Latin America.

“The growth of Levelup.com is a testament to the 60 Billion Dollar Video Game market,” says Ramon Toledo, President of Busca Corp Media Network. “Through our partnership with Prodigy MSN we are well positioned as the #1 Video Game Site for the Latin American and U.S. Hispanic audience.”

Prodigy MSN is the most popular website in Mexico with over 23 million users and features a wide array of world-class services, such as Windows Live Hotmail, Windows Live Messenger, as well as video, news, and the latest in entertainment, lifestyle and sports. Our partnership aims to target the rapidly expanding video game user base which in the 1980’s meant mostly males under the age of 20 but today includes both male and female gamers under the age of 35.

Levelup.com publishes user-generated video game content alongside professionally produced media content that offers tips, strategies, reviews, comments and a place to share experiences with a fully engaged online community. With its unique platform, Levelup.com has experienced strong and steady growth since its launch in 2007.

Levelup.com also recently entered, and is aggressively attacking, the U.S. Hispanic Market and, is opening a largely untapped demographic with huge potential.

Source: Busca Corp