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Sears Goes Social with Hispanics

Sears recently announced several social media efforts aimed at the Hispanic market, including new Facebook and Twitter programs. (It already has three separate Hispanic Web sites, including SearsPR, launched last year, which ships merchandise only to the island of Puerto Rico.)

Marketing Daily caught up with Oscar H. Castro, director/general manager of international e-commerce, for more details on how the Hoffman Estates, Ill.-based retailer hopes to woo the rapidly growing, social-media loving Hispanic market:

Sears Goes Social with Hispanics

Q: How do Hispanic shoppers differ in terms of social media use?

A: Social media is such an important channel for us right now; Hispanic growth on Facebook is eight times larger than the general population, and we know that Hispanic consumers spend more time on it each week as well. So for us, it seems the best thing to do is work with that higher level of engagement. We’re not creating these forums to push products so much as to build stronger relationships. And it’s pretty exciting. In two weeks we’ve gotten 16,000 fans, and a great level of engagement.

Q: But does that mean there is also an increased appetite for retail in social media?

A: Yes, I think Hispanic culture really is different about shopping. It’s much more of a family activity; the whole family goes out to the mall. They are more social about shopping, in general. They want to have more conversations. We want to join the conversation.

Q: Are there gender differences?

A: Well, younger Latinas are more likely to shop online than older women, or men. But other than that, there are not a lot of major differences.

Q: Is it effective for a marketer as large as Sears to focus on a single Hispanic market, when there are so many submarkets?

A: There are so many differences, and that’s what makes Hispanic marketing so difficult. Facebook is a great equalizer, and you can have general conversations with broader appeal. But there are many cultural nuances. What works for a Dominican audience may not for a Mexican one. So some of our efforts are extremely local.

We launched SearsPR.com last year to serve only the Puerto Rican market. We use local terminology, and a completely separate marketing program. Sears offers 290 million products online, and of course, our mission is to help our customer find things anytime, anywhere. But there are items on this site you can’t find in the continental U.S.

Q: Why so many different initiatives?

A: This market is large and projected to grow even further, and we are leaders in it. It’s not going to be a niche market, it’s going to be the U.S. market. And I can’t think of too many brands that have been very effective. McDonald’s now leads with its diversity insights, and Coca-Cola has done a great job in the Latino market. And I think we’ll see more Latin brands crossing over into the mainstream — like Corona beer.

Do you know about people from Ecuador?

A total of 591,000 Hispanics of Ecuadorian origin resided in the United States in 2008, according to the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.

People from Ecuador in this statistical profile are people who self-identified as Hispanics of Ecuadorian origin; this means either they themselves are Ecuadorian immigrants or they trace their family ancestry to Ecuador. Ecuadorians are the ninth-largest population of Hispanic origin living in the United States, accounting for 1.3% of the U.S. Hispanic population in 2008.

A total of 591,000 Hispanics of Ecuadorian origin resided in the United States in 2008, according to the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.

A total of 591,000 Hispanics of Ecuadorian origin resided in the United States in 2008, according to the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.

Mexicans constituted 30.7 million, or 65.7%, of the Hispanic population.1

This statistical profile compares the demographic, income and economic characteristics of the Ecuadorian population with the characteristics of all Hispanics and the U.S. population overall. It is based on Pew Hispanic Center tabulations of the 2008 American Community Survey. Key facts include:

Immigration status. Two-thirds of Ecuadorians (66.4%) in the United States are foreign born compared with 38.1% of Hispanics and 12.5% of the U.S. population overall. Two-thirds of immigrants from Ecuador (66.2%) arrived in the U.S. in 1990 or later. Nearly four-in-ten Ecuadorian immigrants (37.2%) are U.S. citizens.

Language. Less than half of Ecuadorians (49.1%) speak English proficiently.2 Some 50.9% of Ecuadorians ages 5 and older report speaking English less than very well, compared with 37.3% of all Hispanics.

Age. Ecuadorians are younger than the U.S. population and older than Hispanics overall. The median age of Ecuadorians is 32; the median ages of the U.S. population and all Hispanics are 36 and 27, respectively.

Marital status. Ecuadorians are more likely than Hispanics overall to be married—50.7% versus 46.5%.

Fertility. Two-in-ten (20.8%) of Ecuadorian women ages 15 to 44 who gave birth in the 12 months prior to the survey were unmarried. That was less than the rate for all Hispanic women—38.8%—and the rate for U.S. women—34.5%.

Regional dispersion. Two-thirds of Ecuadorians (68.0%) live in the Northeast, and more than four-in-ten (42.5%) live in New York.

Educational attainment. Ecuadorians have higher levels of education than the Hispanic population overall. Some 18.2% of Ecuadorians ages 25 and older—compared with 12.9% of all U.S. Hispanics—have obtained at least a bachelor’s degree.

Income. The median annual personal earnings for Ecuadorians ages 16 and older were $23,423 in 2008; the median earnings for all U.S. Hispanics were $21,488.

Poverty status. The share of Ecuadorians who live in poverty, 13.5%, is similar to the rate for the general U.S. population (12.7%) and below the 20.7% share among all Hispanics.

Health Insurance. One-third of Ecuadorians (34.7%) do not have health insurance compared with 31.7% of all Hispanics and 15.4% of the general U.S. population. Additionally, 16.4% of Ecuadorians younger than 18 are uninsured.

Homeownership. The rate of Ecuadorian homeownership (40.3%) is lower than the rate for all Hispanics (49.1%) and the U.S. population (66.6%) as a whole.

Percentages are computed before numbers are rounded.Ecuadorians ages 5 and older who report speaking only English at home or speaking English very well.Source: Pew Research Center

Who are the Peruvians?

A total of 519,000 Hispanics of Peruvian origin resided in the United States in 2008, according to the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.

A total of 519,000 Hispanics of Peruvian origin resided in the United States in 2008, according to the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.

A total of 519,000 Hispanics of Peruvian origin resided in the United States in 2008, according to the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.

Peruvians in this statistical profile are people who self-identified as Hispanics of Peruvian origin; this means either they themselves are Peruvian immigrants or they trace their family ancestry to Peru. Peruvians are the tenth-largest population of Hispanic origin living in the United States, accounting for 1.1% of the U.S. Hispanic population in 2008. Mexicans constituted 30.7 million, or 65.7%, of the Hispanic population.1

This statistical profile compares the demographic, income and economic characteristics of the Peruvian population with the characteristics of all Hispanics and the U.S. population overall. It is based on Pew Hispanic Center tabulations of the 2008 American Community Survey. Key facts include:

Immigration status. Seven-in-ten Peruvians (69.3%) in the United States are foreign born compared with 38.1% of Hispanics and 12.5% of the U.S. population overall. Two-thirds of immigrants from Peru (66.1%) arrived in the U.S. in 1990 or later. Four-in-ten Peruvian immigrants (42.3%) are U.S. citizens.

Language. A majority of Peruvians (55.1%) speak English proficiently.2 Some 44.9% of Peruvians ages 5 and older report speaking English less than very well, compared with 37.3% of all Hispanics.

Age. Peruvians are similar in age to the U.S. population and older than Hispanics overall. The median age of Peruvians is 35; the median ages of the U.S. population and all Hispanics are 36 and 27, respectively.

Marital status. Peruvians are more likely than Hispanics overall to be married—50.7% versus 46.5%.

Fertility. Two-in-ten Peruvian women (19.6%) ages 15 to 44 who gave birth in the 12 months prior to the survey were unmarried. That was less than the rate for all Hispanic women—38.8%—and the rate for U.S. women—34.5%.

Regional dispersion. Peruvians are more geographically dispersed than other Hispanic origin groups. Two-in-ten Peruvians (19.8%) live in Florida and one-in-six (16.8%) live in California; some one-in-eight live in New Jersey (12.9%) and New York (12.3%).

Educational attainment. Peruvians have higher levels of education than the Hispanic population overall. Some 29.8% of Peruvians ages 25 and older—compared with 12.9% of all U.S. Hispanics—have obtained at least a bachelor’s degree.

Income. The median annual personal earnings for Peruvians ages 16 and older were $24,441 in 2008; the median earnings for all U.S. Hispanics were $21,488.

Poverty status. The share of Peruvians who live in poverty, 9.5%, is lower than the rate of the general U.S. population (12.7%) and the rate among all Hispanics (20.7%).

Health Insurance. Three-in-ten Peruvians (30.2%) do not have health insurance compared with 31.7% of all Hispanics and 15.4% of the general U.S. population. Additionally, 20.0% of Peruvians younger than 18 are uninsured.

Homeownership. The rate of Peruvian homeownership (50.1%) is similar to the rate for all Hispanics (49.1%) but lower than the 66.6% rate for the U.S. population as a whole.

Percentages are computed before numbers are rounded.Peruvians ages 5 and older who report speaking only English at home or speaking English very well.Source: Pew Research Center

What do you know of Hondurans?

A total of 608,000 Hispanics of Honduran origin resided in the United States in 2008, according to the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.

A total of 608,000 Hispanics of Honduran origin resided in the United States in 2008, according to the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.

A total of 608,000 Hispanics of Honduran origin resided in the United States in 2008, according to the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.

Hondurans in this statistical profile are people who self-identified as Hispanics of Honduran origin; this means either they themselves are Honduran immigrants or they trace their family ancestry to Honduras. Hondurans are the eighth-largest population of Hispanic origin living in the United States, accounting for 1.3% of the U.S. Hispanic population in 2008. Mexicans constituted 30.7 million, or 65.7%, of the Hispanic population.1

This statistical profile compares the demographic, income and economic characteristics of the Honduran population with the characteristics of all Hispanics and the U.S. population overall. It is based on Pew Hispanic Center tabulations of the 2008 American Community Survey. Key facts include:

Immigration status. Seven-in-ten Hondurans (68.6%) in the United States are foreign born compared with 38.1% of Hispanics and 12.5% of the U.S. population overall. Three-in-four immigrants from Honduras (74.0%) arrived in the U.S. in 1990 or later. Two-in-ten Honduran immigrants (21.9%) are U.S. citizens.

Language. Four-in-ten Hondurans (39.7%) speak English proficiently.2 Some 60.3% of Hondurans ages 5 and older report speaking English less than very well, compared with 37.3% of all Hispanics.

Age. Hondurans are younger than the U.S. population and similar in age to Hispanics overall. The median age of Hondurans is 28; the median ages of the U.S. population and all Hispanics are 36 and 27, respectively.

Marital status. Hondurans are less likely than Hispanics overall to be married—40.6% versus 46.5%.

Fertility. Four-in-ten (42.5%) of Honduran women ages 15 to 44 who gave birth in the 12 months prior to the survey were unmarried. That was greater than the rate for all Hispanic women—38.8%—and the rate for U.S. women—34.5%.

Regional dispersion. A majority of Hondurans (54.9%) live in the South, mostly in Florida and Texas. Some one-in-eight Hondurans (12.9%) live in California and in New York (12.5%).

Educational attainment. Hondurans have lower levels of education than the Hispanic population overall. Some 50.0% of Hondurans ages 25 and older—compared with 39.2% of all U.S. Hispanics—have not obtained at least a high school diploma.

Income. The median annual personal earnings for Hondurans ages 16 and older were $19,349 in 2008; the median earnings for all U.S. Hispanics were $21,488.

Poverty status. The share of Hondurans who live in poverty, 21.5%, is higher than the rate for the general U.S. population (12.7%) and similar to the rate for Hispanics overall (20.7%).

Health Insurance. One-half of Hondurans (49.3%) do not have health insurance compared with 31.7% of all Hispanics and 15.4% of the general U.S. population. Additionally, 26.4% of Hondurans younger than 18 are uninsured.

Homeownership. The rate of Honduran homeownership (33.9%) is lower than the rate for all Hispanics (49.1%) and the U.S. population (66.6%) as a whole.

Percentages are computed before numbers are rounded.Hondurans ages 5 and older who report speaking only English at home or speaking English very well.Source: Pew Research Center

Meet the Colombians!!!

A total of 882,000 Hispanics of Colombian origin resided in the United States in 2008, according to the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.

A total of 882,000 Hispanics of Colombian origin resided in the United States in 2008, according to the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.

A total of 882,000 Hispanics of Colombian origin resided in the United States in 2008, according to the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.

Colombians in this statistical profile are people who self-identified as Hispanics of Colombian origin; this means either they themselves are Colombian immigrants or they trace their family ancestry to Colombia. Colombians are the seventh-largest population of Hispanic origin living in the United States, accounting for 1.9% of the U.S. Hispanic population in 2008. Mexicans constituted 30.7 million, or 65.7%, of the Hispanic population.1

This statistical profile compares the demographic, income and economic characteristics of the Colombian population with the characteristics of all Hispanics and the U.S. population overall. It is based on Pew Hispanic Center tabulations of the 2008 American Community Survey. Key facts include:

Immigration status. Two-thirds of Colombians (66.5%) in the United States are foreign born compared with 38.1% of Hispanics and 12.5% of the U.S. population overall. Most immigrants from Colombia (58.7%) arrived in the U.S. in 1990 or later. Less than half of Colombian immigrants (48.8%) are U.S. citizens.

Language. A majority of Colombians (57.5%) speak English proficiently.2 Some 42.5% of Colombians ages 5 and older report speaking English less than very well, compared with 37.3% of all Hispanics

Age. Colombians are older than Hispanics overall. The median age of  Colombians is 36, which is the same as the median ages of the U.S. population; the median age of all Hispanics is 27.

Marital status. Colombians are more likely than Hispanics overall to be married—50.4% versus 46.5%.

Fertility. One-in-five (21.6%) Colombian women ages 15 to 44 who gave birth in the 12 months prior to the survey were unmarried. That was less than the rate for all Hispanic women—38.8%—and the rate for U.S. women—34.5%.

Regional dispersion. Colombians are concentrated in the South (46.8%), mostly in Florida (31.9%), and in the Northeast (37.3%), mostly in New York (16.1%) and New Jersey (12.9%).

Educational attainment. Colombians have higher levels of education than the Hispanic population overall. Some 30.3% of Colombians ages 25 and older—compared with 12.9% of all U.S. Hispanics—have obtained at least a bachelor’s degree.

Income. The median annual personal earnings for Colombians ages 16 and older were $25,460 in 2008; the median earnings for all U.S. Hispanics were $21,488.

Poverty status. The share of Colombians who live in poverty, 11.0%, is similar to the rate for the general U.S. population (12.7%) and lower than the rate for Hispanics overall (20.7%).

Health Insurance. One-quarter of Colombians (26.4%) do not have health insurance compared with 31.7% of all Hispanics and 15.4% of the general U.S. population. Additionally, 16.6% of Colombians younger than 18 are uninsured.

Homeownership. The rate of Colombian homeownership (53.0%) is higher than the rate for all Hispanics (49.1%) but lower than the 66.6% rate for the U.S. population as a whole.

Percentages are computed before numbers are rounded.Colombians ages 5 and older who report speaking only English at home or speaking English very well.Source: Pew Hispanic

Corona ‘Can Do’ With New 24-Ounce Cans

Demand for single-serve business drives Corona Extra and Corona Light brand offerings

Crown Imports today announced the launch of new Corona Extra and Corona Light 24-ounce can packages aimed at the $3.2 billion single-serve segment of the beer business.

Demand for single-serve business drives Corona Extra and Corona Light brand offerings

Demand for single-serve business drives Corona Extra and Corona Light brand offerings

“This occasion based business already represents nearly 13 percent of dollar share in the off-premise channel. Based on the growing demand from consumers and retailers for single-serve options, we see a great opportunity for Corona in this space,” said Jim Sabia, Executive Vice President of Marketing for Crown Imports, Corona’s exclusive U.S. importer.

According to IRI data, over the past four years import brands in the 24-ounce single-serve segment have averaged 13.3 percent case sales growth versus 4.7 percent for domestics, accelerating faster than the category case trend by nearly seven fold.

The Corona Extra 24-oz can will arrive at retail in 26 initial markets* this month with the Corona Light can to follow shortly thereafter. The Corona Extra and Corona Light 24-ounce cans are targeted to 21-44 year-old General Market and Hispanic drinkers from the service and manufacturing trades. “Our consumer research indicates these consumers see Corona as a reward. Our 24-ounce cans offer a new trade-up option for drinkers looking for a premium beer experience,” Sabia said. The previously introduced Corona Extra 24-ounce single-serve bottle is currently a top ten package amongst all 24-ounce packages according to IRI.

Primary channels of distribution for the new Corona Extra and Corona Light 24-ounce cans are convenience, drug, liquor and grocery stores. “Convenience stores especially may benefit from the incremental purchase occasions and additional traffic the Corona Extra and Corona Light 24-ounce cans would deliver,” reports Bruce Jacobson, Executive Vice President of Sales for Crown Imports. IRI reports indicate that single-serve 24-ounce packages represents close to 11 percent of the case volume sold in the convenience store channel, making it a key package in a channel designed around convenience and immediate consumption.

Crown continues to invest in new packages and options suitable for the off-premise channel and at-home consumption opportunities. According to the Beer Institute, the off-premise channel currently delivers 82 percent of beer industry volume and may lead category resurgence in the year ahead.

*Editor’s note: 26 initial markets include AZ, CA, CO, CT, D.C., FL, GA, IL, IN, LA, MA, MD, MI, MO, NC, NJ, NM, NV, NY, OH, OR, SC, TN, TX, VA, WA.

Source: IRI InfoScan, Total US Fs/Dg/Cv, 52 weeks ending 9/2/09

About Crown Imports

Crown Imports LLC is a joint venture that imports, distributes and markets the Modelo portfolio and other fine beer brands across the entire U.S. The Modelo portfolio includes Corona Extra, the #1 imported beer in the U.S. and #6 beer overall, Corona Light, Modelo Especial, Negra Modelo and Pacifico beer brands. For more information, visit www.crownimportsllc.com. Crown Imports is a 50-50 joint venture between Grupo Modelo, S.A. de C.V. (MX: GMODELOC), Mexico’s leading company in the brewing, distribution and sale of beer, and Constellation Brands, Inc. (NYSE: STZ, ASX: CBR), a leading international beverage alcohol producer, importer and marketer.

SOURCE Crown Imports LLC