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Managers’ Hiring Practices Vary By Race & Ethnicity

Managers' Hiring Practices Vary By Race, Ethnicity Says University of Miami Study

Managers’ Hiring Practices Vary By Race, Ethnicity Says University of Miami Study

Managers’ Hiring Practices Vary By Race, Ethnicity Says University of Miami Study

White, Asian and Hispanic managers tend to hire more whites and fewer blacks than black managers do, according to a new study out of the University of Miami School of Business Administration.

Using more than two years of personnel data from a large U.S. retail chain, the study found that when a black manager in a typical store is replaced by a white, Asian or Hispanic manager, the share of newly hired blacks falls from 21 to 17 percent, and the share of whites hired rises from 60 to 64 percent. The effect is even stronger for stores located in the South, where the replacement of a black manager causes the share of newly hired blacks to fall from 29 to 21 percent. In locations with large Hispanic populations, Hispanics hire more Hispanics and fewer whites than white managers. The study is out this month in the Journal of Labor Economics.

The finding is clear evidence that the race or ethnicity of those who make hiring decisions can have a strong impact in the racial makeup of a company’s workforce, says Laura Giuliano, an assistant professor of economics at the University of Miami School of Business, who authored the study with David Levine and Jonathan Leonard from the University of California, Berkeley.

How strong is the impact? Consider a typical store with 40 employees located in the Southern U.S. According to the data, replacing a black manager with a non-black manager would result in the replacement of three to four black workers with white workers over the course of one year.

The effect in a non-Southern store would also be significant, if a bit more subtle. Replacing a black manager in a non-Southern store would result in one black worker being replaced by a white worker over a year.

“From the viewpoint of a district manager who is observing just a small sample of stores, this change might go unnoticed or appear insignificant,” Giuliano said. “However, the change may appear more significant from the point of view of job seekers — and especially black job seekers. In fact, the change in non-Southern stores amounts to a proportional decline of 15 percent in the number of blacks employed.”

The data used by Giuliano and her colleagues were especially well suited to sorting out the role race plays in hiring. While previous studies have also suggested that manager race plays a role, those studies have been unable to distinguish that role from other factors such as the demographic makeup of the local labor pool. Giuliano and her colleagues were able to isolate the race factor by tracking individual stores that experienced a change of manager.

“This means we can compare the hiring patterns of consecutive managers of different races in the same store,” she said. “Hence we can isolate the effect of a manager’s race by comparing the hiring patterns of managers when they hire from similar labor pools under similar conditions.”

The researchers were also able to use their data to offer some partial explanations for why these differences in hiring patterns exist.

They found that both black and non-black managers tend to hire people who live close to them. So if black managers live in predominantly black neighborhoods, their hiring network is also likely to be predominantly black.

The research also suggests that black managers hire fewer whites because whites may be less willing to work for black managers. The study found that when a white manager is replaced with a black manager, the rate at which white workers quit their jobs increases by 15 percent.

“We interpret this increase in the white quit rate as evidence of discriminatory sorting by white job seekers,” the authors write. “It implies that whites who dislike working for black managers often avoid working for black managers in the first place.”

About the University of Miami School of Business Administration

The University of Miami School of Business Administration is a comprehensive business school, offering undergraduate business, full-time MBA, Executive MBA, MS, PhD and non-degree executive education programs. One of 12 colleges and schools at the University of Miami, the School is located in a major hub of international trade and commerce and acclaimed for the global orientation and diversity of its faculty, students and curriculum. The School delivers its programs at its main campus in Coral Gables as well as at locations across Florida and abroad. More information about the University of Miami School of Business can be found at www.bus.miami.edu.

NOTE TO EDITORS: A full copy of the study is available upon request. The University of Miami has a television studio on campus and can provide live expert interviews via satellite or Vyvx fiber.

    Media Contact:
    Tracy Simon
    University of Miami School of Business Administration
    267-679-2774
    tsimon@sba.umiami.edu

SOURCE University of Miami School of Business Administration

Infinity Insurance Joins the Fight Against Unemployment

California’s unemployment rate reached 11.9% in July and continues to climb. The state’s Hispanic community has been hit even harder. Some estimates forecast a jobless rate as high as 18% for this group by the end of the year.

Infinity Insurance is launching a free job search assistance program titled “Monarca,” designed to help workers in the hardest hit communities in Southern California find jobs. The program seeks to pool resources from local small businesses and organizations to connect out-of-work people with employment opportunities.

Programa Monarca officially launches on Labor Day September 7th and offers a range of free services including:

  • Job searching assistance
  • Help filling out job applications
  • Resume and cover letter writing support
  • Printing and faxing
  • Interview preparation and coaching

Programa Monarca is inspired by the Monarch butterfly, famous for its lengthy annual migration between Mexico and the United States. “Monarch butterflies symbolize hard work, persistence and the strength of community,” said Tania Calderon of Crown Reinas Insurance, one of many local Infinity independent insurance agents supporting the cause.

For further information on Programa Monarca, call 1-800-863-5930 or visit ProgramaMonarca.org. Businesses wishing to participate in the program should contact Janndee Evans at 1-562-653-2211

Source: Infinity Insurance

Hispanic Business Magazine Announces 500 Largest U.S. Hispanic-owned Companies

SANTA BARBARA, Calif., June 29 /PRNewswire/ — The June 2009 issue of Hispanic Business magazine features the 27th annual Hispanic Business 500, the benchmark directory of the 500 largest Hispanic-owned companies in the United States.
The annual Hispanic Business 500 directory is widely recognized as the barometer of the U.S. Hispanic economy. Cumulative revenues for the directory totaled $36.15 billion, a slight increase from 2008, which totaled $36.10 billion. A searchable directory of the 2009 Hispanic Business 500 is available now on the magazine’s companion web site, HispanicBusiness.com.
For the third straight year, the HB 500’s top-ranked company was the aptly named Brightstar, a global telecom wholesaler. Though the company posted a dip in revenue of 2.35 percent, it still managed to bring in $3.6 billion.
The surprising bright spot of this year’s list was the financial sector, which posted an impressive 17.2 percent boost in revenues. Pan-American Life Insurance Co. of New Orleans was among the successful businesses in this category, showing an 11 percent gain in revenue over the previous year, as well as a healthy 6 percent profit.
Companies included in the 500 must show at least 51 percent ownership by Hispanic U.S. citizens and must maintain headquarters in one of the 50 states or Washington, D.C. Principals must be U.S. citizens.
For more information, go to http://www.hispanicbusiness.com/rankings/hispanic_companies/
About Hispanic Business Media
For 30 years Hispanic Business Media has been the authoritative source for the latest trends, research and reporting on the growth of the U.S. Hispanic consumer market and the Hispanic enterprise and professional sectors.
Hispanic Business Media properties provide innovative branding and targeted marketing solutions across multiple platforms:
— Award-winning print editorial via Hispanic Business Magazine, which provides readers in the United States and around the world with the most relevant and data-driven news on the U.S. Hispanic economy. — Fresh, real-time online content and interaction via HispanicBusiness.com. The site specializes in b2b daily news, branded content from Hispanic Business magazine, original postings by hb.com writers and some user-generated content. — Hispanic Business Events, which feature and draw the nation’s most affluent and influential Hispanic leaders. Examples include the Hispanic Business magazine EOY Awards for entrepreneurial excellence; the CEO Capital Markets Roundtable; and the Woman of the Year (WOY) Awards. — Unique data reports on the U.S. Hispanic sector developed by HispanTelligence, the research arm of Hispanic Business Media. — Diversity recruiting and development services from HireDiversity.com.
HispanicBusiness magazine, HispanicBusiness.com, Hispanic Business magazine EOY, HireDiversity.com and HispanTelligence are registered trademarks of Hispanic Business Inc. 2008 Hispanic Business Inc. All rights reserved. Hispanic Business Media
Web Site: http://www.hispanicbusiness.com/
Source: PR Newswire

SANTA BARBARA, Calif., June 29 /PRNewswire/ — The June 2009 issue of Hispanic Business magazine features the 27th annual Hispanic Business 500, the benchmark directory of the 500 largest Hispanic-owned companies in the United States.

The annual Hispanic Business 500 directory is widely recognized as the barometer of the U.S. Hispanic economy. Cumulative revenues for the directory totaled $36.15 billion, a slight increase from 2008, which totaled $36.10 billion. A searchable directory of the 2009 Hispanic Business 500 is available now on the magazine’s companion web site, HispanicBusiness.com.

For the third straight year, the HB 500’s top-ranked company was the aptly named Brightstar, a global telecom wholesaler. Though the company posted a dip in revenue of 2.35 percent, it still managed to bring in $3.6 billion.

The surprising bright spot of this year’s list was the financial sector, which posted an impressive 17.2 percent boost in revenues. Pan-American Life Insurance Co. of New Orleans was among the successful businesses in this category, showing an 11 percent gain in revenue over the previous year, as well as a healthy 6 percent profit.

Companies included in the 500 must show at least 51 percent ownership by Hispanic U.S. citizens and must maintain headquarters in one of the 50 states or Washington, D.C. Principals must be U.S. citizens.

For more information, go to http://www.hispanicbusiness.com/rankings/hispanic_companies/

About Hispanic Business Media
For 30 years Hispanic Business Media has been the authoritative source for the latest trends, research and reporting on the growth of the U.S. Hispanic consumer market and the Hispanic enterprise and professional sectors.
Hispanic Business Media properties provide innovative branding and targeted marketing solutions across multiple platforms:
— Award-winning print editorial via Hispanic Business Magazine, which provides readers in the United States and around the world with the most relevant and data-driven news on the U.S. Hispanic economy. — Fresh, real-time online content and interaction via HispanicBusiness.com. The site specializes in b2b daily news, branded content from Hispanic Business magazine, original postings by hb.com writers and some user-generated content. — Hispanic Business Events, which feature and draw the nation’s most affluent and influential Hispanic leaders. Examples include the Hispanic Business magazine EOY Awards for entrepreneurial excellence; the CEO Capital Markets Roundtable; and the Woman of the Year (WOY) Awards. — Unique data reports on the U.S. Hispanic sector developed by HispanTelligence, the research arm of Hispanic Business Media. — Diversity recruiting and development services from HireDiversity.com.
HispanicBusiness magazine, HispanicBusiness.com, Hispanic Business magazine EOY, HireDiversity.com and HispanTelligence are registered trademarks of Hispanic Business Inc. 2008 Hispanic Business Inc. All rights reserved. Hispanic Business Media
Web Site: http://www.hispanicbusiness.com/
Source: PR Newswire

MillerCoors pact to serve Hispanics

MillerCoors pledged Friday to increase economic opportunities for Hispanics through an agreement with the Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility.
Through the joint agreement, MillerCoors and the Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility promise to increase and enhance economic opportunities for Hispanics through increased participation in key corporate initiatives such as leadership and work force development, procurement and supplier diversity, marketing and advertising, and community contributions.
“Growing and leveraging diversity will provide MillerCoors with a competitive advantage that will not only strengthen our business, but also strengthen the Hispanic community,” said Leo Kiely, MillerCoors CEO. “Through this agreement we will be able to use our collective power to achieve an important goal for both our organizations, to have Hispanics participating at greater levels in our business.”
The new five-year agreement is the first since MillerCoors was created in July 2008. Coors was a founding corporate member of HACR and has maintained an agreement since 1986.
“It is gratifying to see that MillerCoors recognizes the growing influence of Latinos in the marketplace, workplace and social mainstream, said HACR president and CEO Carlos Orta.
MillerCoors is a joint venture of Denver-based Molson Coors Brewing Co. and SABMiller PLC that combines the two international beer companies’ U.S. brewing operations.

MillerCoors pledged Friday to increase economic opportunities for Hispanics through an agreement with the Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility.

Through the joint agreement, MillerCoors and the Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility promise to increase and enhance economic opportunities for Hispanics through increased participation in key corporate initiatives such as leadership and work force development, procurement and supplier diversity, marketing and advertising, and community contributions.

“Growing and leveraging diversity will provide MillerCoors with a competitive advantage that will not only strengthen our business, but also strengthen the Hispanic community,” said Leo Kiely, MillerCoors CEO. “Through this agreement we will be able to use our collective power to achieve an important goal for both our organizations, to have Hispanics participating at greater levels in our business.”

The new five-year agreement is the first since MillerCoors was created in July 2008. Coors was a founding corporate member of HACR and has maintained an agreement since 1986.

“It is gratifying to see that MillerCoors recognizes the growing influence of Latinos in the marketplace, workplace and social mainstream, said HACR president and CEO Carlos Orta.

MillerCoors is a joint venture of Denver-based Molson Coors Brewing Co. and SABMiller PLC that combines the two international beer companies’ U.S. brewing operations.

Source: Denver Business Journal

Hispanics Face Discrimination Even Among Their Own

When Hiring, Look at Talent not Surface Features

I often receive phone calls from advertising colleagues who are looking to add Latino talent to their teams. The caller might own or work for a Hispanic market agency, or a multicultural agency or a general-market agency. He might be a headhunter hired to work with any of these agency types. In most cases, the request is simply about who I know that is talented, easy to work with and has all the right skill sets. However, in some cases, certain biases rear their ugly heads. I’m asked questions that have no business being asked in this day and age. At a time when jobs are hard to find, it pains me to believe that there are worthy candidates being passed over because of:

It's more important to be NICE

It’s more important to be NICE

Skin Color: General-market agencies are often criticized for the lack of diversity within their ranks and, in many cases, they certainly should be. But if truth be told, there are U.S. Hispanic agencies whose staff photos simply do not reflect the diversity of the U.S. Hispanic population as a whole. Black Hispanics have historically found it difficult to find acceptance within some Hispanic circles. The same holds true for the more brown-skinned Mexican-Americans or those who self-define as chicanos. Occasionally, the white, blond, blue-eyed Hispanic will also lose out on a job opportunity because he doesn’t fulfill the agencies expectations of what a Hispanic is, particularly when general-market agencies are trying to hire window dressing to check off a diversity box or create the illusion of having a Hispanic competency in-house.

Social Status: Often U.S.-born Latinos, and particularly those of Mexican descent, are judged based upon their parents’ social status, regardless of what the candidate’s U.S. social reality is. This stems from country-of-origin practices that prioritize a more European-influenced presentation skewing toward lighter hair, lighter eyes, lighter skin and a facial bone structure that does not shout “indigenous” (or doesn’t bear “la mancha de platano” as a friend of mine used to say). I know that there are Latinos in hiring positions that will rule out candidates because they remind them of the maids and cleaning ladies that were a part of their foreign-born reality. I know there are non-Latinos that will do the same based on their U.S.-born frame of reference. While the hiring of foreign-born Latinos from Argentina, Colombia and other South American countries is often discussed in terms of the need for better language skills, there are most definitely other factors, including social status, that in some agencies make a U.S.-born Latino a less desirable hire.

Accents: Of course no one is going to hire someone who can’t make themselves understood to an English-only customer base, unless the role does not require direct client contact. However, there are any number of accented Latinos who not only can make themselves understood, but also can out-think and outperform some of their non-accented co-workers. Nonetheless, over the past six months, I have received at least two calls from general-market colleagues about creative positions they were seeking to fill. And in both cases they were hoping I knew someone who “didn’t have an accent” because they didn’t feel their clients would be comfortable. On the flip side, I’ve seen clients fall head over heels in love with accented Latino creatives, deeming them to be somehow more authentic because of their accent. Sometimes the adoration is warranted because the quality of the work is that good — accent or not. But frankly, I’ve seen really poor work get pitched by heavily accented old-school salesmen and get approved because of the illusion of authenticity and therefore the implied expertise that the accent created. Perhaps worse off than the accented creative is the accented account person, who is often not considered client-worthy regardless of intellect and ability to write, present and handle the requirements of the job.

I have always found the hiring process to be complex. Resumes get screened and, no matter how free of bias one believes themselves to be, perceptions get formed based on names, colleges, who-knows-who in common, and a myriad of other pieces of information. All that before the person ever walks in the door. Then there’s the voice on the answering machine, the grammar in the e-mail and the first impression when they do finally walk in and shake your hand. Even the handshake sends its own message of strength or weakness, confidence or insecurity.

We are none of us perfect. That said, we still owe it to ourselves and each other to work at being fair and impartial. We must leave our prejudices and personal preferences at the door.

I know that every job candidate turned down for a position could cry foul regardless of ethnic or racial background. Maybe it’s age or gender. Maybe it’s the cologne he wears. Who knows? But the fact is that for Latino job candidates trying to deal with the day-to-day realities of the advertising and marketing industries (including the multicultural and U.S. Hispanic advertising agencies), there are subtle and not so subtle forms of discrimination that often go undetected or are rarely acknowledged or discussed. If putting it out there helps one person go from unemployed to employed during these most difficult of times, this blog will have served its purpose.

Source: Rochelle Newman-Carrasco – http://adage.com/bigtent/post?article_id=137503 Hispanics Face Discrimination Even Among Their Own

Managers’ Hiring Practices Vary By Race & Ethnicity

Managers' Hiring Practices Vary By Race, Ethnicity Says University of Miami Study

Managers’ Hiring Practices Vary By Race, Ethnicity Says University of Miami Study

Managers’ Hiring Practices Vary By Race, Ethnicity Says University of Miami Study

White, Asian and Hispanic managers tend to hire more whites and fewer blacks than black managers do, according to a new study out of the University of Miami School of Business Administration.

Using more than two years of personnel data from a large U.S. retail chain, the study found that when a black manager in a typical store is replaced by a white, Asian or Hispanic manager, the share of newly hired blacks falls from 21 to 17 percent, and the share of whites hired rises from 60 to 64 percent. The effect is even stronger for stores located in the South, where the replacement of a black manager causes the share of newly hired blacks to fall from 29 to 21 percent. In locations with large Hispanic populations, Hispanics hire more Hispanics and fewer whites than white managers. The study is out this month in the Journal of Labor Economics.

The finding is clear evidence that the race or ethnicity of those who make hiring decisions can have a strong impact in the racial makeup of a company’s workforce, says Laura Giuliano, an assistant professor of economics at the University of Miami School of Business, who authored the study with David Levine and Jonathan Leonard from the University of California, Berkeley.

How strong is the impact? Consider a typical store with 40 employees located in the Southern U.S. According to the data, replacing a black manager with a non-black manager would result in the replacement of three to four black workers with white workers over the course of one year.

The effect in a non-Southern store would also be significant, if a bit more subtle. Replacing a black manager in a non-Southern store would result in one black worker being replaced by a white worker over a year.

“From the viewpoint of a district manager who is observing just a small sample of stores, this change might go unnoticed or appear insignificant,” Giuliano said. “However, the change may appear more significant from the point of view of job seekers — and especially black job seekers. In fact, the change in non-Southern stores amounts to a proportional decline of 15 percent in the number of blacks employed.”

The data used by Giuliano and her colleagues were especially well suited to sorting out the role race plays in hiring. While previous studies have also suggested that manager race plays a role, those studies have been unable to distinguish that role from other factors such as the demographic makeup of the local labor pool. Giuliano and her colleagues were able to isolate the race factor by tracking individual stores that experienced a change of manager.

“This means we can compare the hiring patterns of consecutive managers of different races in the same store,” she said. “Hence we can isolate the effect of a manager’s race by comparing the hiring patterns of managers when they hire from similar labor pools under similar conditions.”

The researchers were also able to use their data to offer some partial explanations for why these differences in hiring patterns exist.

They found that both black and non-black managers tend to hire people who live close to them. So if black managers live in predominantly black neighborhoods, their hiring network is also likely to be predominantly black.

The research also suggests that black managers hire fewer whites because whites may be less willing to work for black managers. The study found that when a white manager is replaced with a black manager, the rate at which white workers quit their jobs increases by 15 percent.

“We interpret this increase in the white quit rate as evidence of discriminatory sorting by white job seekers,” the authors write. “It implies that whites who dislike working for black managers often avoid working for black managers in the first place.”

About the University of Miami School of Business Administration

The University of Miami School of Business Administration is a comprehensive business school, offering undergraduate business, full-time MBA, Executive MBA, MS, PhD and non-degree executive education programs. One of 12 colleges and schools at the University of Miami, the School is located in a major hub of international trade and commerce and acclaimed for the global orientation and diversity of its faculty, students and curriculum. The School delivers its programs at its main campus in Coral Gables as well as at locations across Florida and abroad. More information about the University of Miami School of Business can be found at www.bus.miami.edu.

NOTE TO EDITORS: A full copy of the study is available upon request. The University of Miami has a television studio on campus and can provide live expert interviews via satellite or Vyvx fiber.

    Media Contact:
    Tracy Simon
    University of Miami School of Business Administration
    267-679-2774
    tsimon@sba.umiami.edu

SOURCE University of Miami School of Business Administration

Infinity Insurance Joins the Fight Against Unemployment

California’s unemployment rate reached 11.9% in July and continues to climb. The state’s Hispanic community has been hit even harder. Some estimates forecast a jobless rate as high as 18% for this group by the end of the year.

Infinity Insurance is launching a free job search assistance program titled “Monarca,” designed to help workers in the hardest hit communities in Southern California find jobs. The program seeks to pool resources from local small businesses and organizations to connect out-of-work people with employment opportunities.

Programa Monarca officially launches on Labor Day September 7th and offers a range of free services including:

  • Job searching assistance
  • Help filling out job applications
  • Resume and cover letter writing support
  • Printing and faxing
  • Interview preparation and coaching

Programa Monarca is inspired by the Monarch butterfly, famous for its lengthy annual migration between Mexico and the United States. “Monarch butterflies symbolize hard work, persistence and the strength of community,” said Tania Calderon of Crown Reinas Insurance, one of many local Infinity independent insurance agents supporting the cause.

For further information on Programa Monarca, call 1-800-863-5930 or visit ProgramaMonarca.org. Businesses wishing to participate in the program should contact Janndee Evans at 1-562-653-2211

Source: Infinity Insurance

Hispanic Business Magazine Announces 500 Largest U.S. Hispanic-owned Companies

SANTA BARBARA, Calif., June 29 /PRNewswire/ — The June 2009 issue of Hispanic Business magazine features the 27th annual Hispanic Business 500, the benchmark directory of the 500 largest Hispanic-owned companies in the United States.
The annual Hispanic Business 500 directory is widely recognized as the barometer of the U.S. Hispanic economy. Cumulative revenues for the directory totaled $36.15 billion, a slight increase from 2008, which totaled $36.10 billion. A searchable directory of the 2009 Hispanic Business 500 is available now on the magazine’s companion web site, HispanicBusiness.com.
For the third straight year, the HB 500’s top-ranked company was the aptly named Brightstar, a global telecom wholesaler. Though the company posted a dip in revenue of 2.35 percent, it still managed to bring in $3.6 billion.
The surprising bright spot of this year’s list was the financial sector, which posted an impressive 17.2 percent boost in revenues. Pan-American Life Insurance Co. of New Orleans was among the successful businesses in this category, showing an 11 percent gain in revenue over the previous year, as well as a healthy 6 percent profit.
Companies included in the 500 must show at least 51 percent ownership by Hispanic U.S. citizens and must maintain headquarters in one of the 50 states or Washington, D.C. Principals must be U.S. citizens.
For more information, go to http://www.hispanicbusiness.com/rankings/hispanic_companies/
About Hispanic Business Media
For 30 years Hispanic Business Media has been the authoritative source for the latest trends, research and reporting on the growth of the U.S. Hispanic consumer market and the Hispanic enterprise and professional sectors.
Hispanic Business Media properties provide innovative branding and targeted marketing solutions across multiple platforms:
— Award-winning print editorial via Hispanic Business Magazine, which provides readers in the United States and around the world with the most relevant and data-driven news on the U.S. Hispanic economy. — Fresh, real-time online content and interaction via HispanicBusiness.com. The site specializes in b2b daily news, branded content from Hispanic Business magazine, original postings by hb.com writers and some user-generated content. — Hispanic Business Events, which feature and draw the nation’s most affluent and influential Hispanic leaders. Examples include the Hispanic Business magazine EOY Awards for entrepreneurial excellence; the CEO Capital Markets Roundtable; and the Woman of the Year (WOY) Awards. — Unique data reports on the U.S. Hispanic sector developed by HispanTelligence, the research arm of Hispanic Business Media. — Diversity recruiting and development services from HireDiversity.com.
HispanicBusiness magazine, HispanicBusiness.com, Hispanic Business magazine EOY, HireDiversity.com and HispanTelligence are registered trademarks of Hispanic Business Inc. 2008 Hispanic Business Inc. All rights reserved. Hispanic Business Media
Web Site: http://www.hispanicbusiness.com/
Source: PR Newswire

SANTA BARBARA, Calif., June 29 /PRNewswire/ — The June 2009 issue of Hispanic Business magazine features the 27th annual Hispanic Business 500, the benchmark directory of the 500 largest Hispanic-owned companies in the United States.

The annual Hispanic Business 500 directory is widely recognized as the barometer of the U.S. Hispanic economy. Cumulative revenues for the directory totaled $36.15 billion, a slight increase from 2008, which totaled $36.10 billion. A searchable directory of the 2009 Hispanic Business 500 is available now on the magazine’s companion web site, HispanicBusiness.com.

For the third straight year, the HB 500’s top-ranked company was the aptly named Brightstar, a global telecom wholesaler. Though the company posted a dip in revenue of 2.35 percent, it still managed to bring in $3.6 billion.

The surprising bright spot of this year’s list was the financial sector, which posted an impressive 17.2 percent boost in revenues. Pan-American Life Insurance Co. of New Orleans was among the successful businesses in this category, showing an 11 percent gain in revenue over the previous year, as well as a healthy 6 percent profit.

Companies included in the 500 must show at least 51 percent ownership by Hispanic U.S. citizens and must maintain headquarters in one of the 50 states or Washington, D.C. Principals must be U.S. citizens.

For more information, go to http://www.hispanicbusiness.com/rankings/hispanic_companies/

About Hispanic Business Media
For 30 years Hispanic Business Media has been the authoritative source for the latest trends, research and reporting on the growth of the U.S. Hispanic consumer market and the Hispanic enterprise and professional sectors.
Hispanic Business Media properties provide innovative branding and targeted marketing solutions across multiple platforms:
— Award-winning print editorial via Hispanic Business Magazine, which provides readers in the United States and around the world with the most relevant and data-driven news on the U.S. Hispanic economy. — Fresh, real-time online content and interaction via HispanicBusiness.com. The site specializes in b2b daily news, branded content from Hispanic Business magazine, original postings by hb.com writers and some user-generated content. — Hispanic Business Events, which feature and draw the nation’s most affluent and influential Hispanic leaders. Examples include the Hispanic Business magazine EOY Awards for entrepreneurial excellence; the CEO Capital Markets Roundtable; and the Woman of the Year (WOY) Awards. — Unique data reports on the U.S. Hispanic sector developed by HispanTelligence, the research arm of Hispanic Business Media. — Diversity recruiting and development services from HireDiversity.com.
HispanicBusiness magazine, HispanicBusiness.com, Hispanic Business magazine EOY, HireDiversity.com and HispanTelligence are registered trademarks of Hispanic Business Inc. 2008 Hispanic Business Inc. All rights reserved. Hispanic Business Media
Web Site: http://www.hispanicbusiness.com/
Source: PR Newswire

MillerCoors pact to serve Hispanics

MillerCoors pledged Friday to increase economic opportunities for Hispanics through an agreement with the Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility.
Through the joint agreement, MillerCoors and the Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility promise to increase and enhance economic opportunities for Hispanics through increased participation in key corporate initiatives such as leadership and work force development, procurement and supplier diversity, marketing and advertising, and community contributions.
“Growing and leveraging diversity will provide MillerCoors with a competitive advantage that will not only strengthen our business, but also strengthen the Hispanic community,” said Leo Kiely, MillerCoors CEO. “Through this agreement we will be able to use our collective power to achieve an important goal for both our organizations, to have Hispanics participating at greater levels in our business.”
The new five-year agreement is the first since MillerCoors was created in July 2008. Coors was a founding corporate member of HACR and has maintained an agreement since 1986.
“It is gratifying to see that MillerCoors recognizes the growing influence of Latinos in the marketplace, workplace and social mainstream, said HACR president and CEO Carlos Orta.
MillerCoors is a joint venture of Denver-based Molson Coors Brewing Co. and SABMiller PLC that combines the two international beer companies’ U.S. brewing operations.

MillerCoors pledged Friday to increase economic opportunities for Hispanics through an agreement with the Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility.

Through the joint agreement, MillerCoors and the Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility promise to increase and enhance economic opportunities for Hispanics through increased participation in key corporate initiatives such as leadership and work force development, procurement and supplier diversity, marketing and advertising, and community contributions.

“Growing and leveraging diversity will provide MillerCoors with a competitive advantage that will not only strengthen our business, but also strengthen the Hispanic community,” said Leo Kiely, MillerCoors CEO. “Through this agreement we will be able to use our collective power to achieve an important goal for both our organizations, to have Hispanics participating at greater levels in our business.”

The new five-year agreement is the first since MillerCoors was created in July 2008. Coors was a founding corporate member of HACR and has maintained an agreement since 1986.

“It is gratifying to see that MillerCoors recognizes the growing influence of Latinos in the marketplace, workplace and social mainstream, said HACR president and CEO Carlos Orta.

MillerCoors is a joint venture of Denver-based Molson Coors Brewing Co. and SABMiller PLC that combines the two international beer companies’ U.S. brewing operations.

Source: Denver Business Journal

Hispanics Face Discrimination Even Among Their Own

When Hiring, Look at Talent not Surface Features

I often receive phone calls from advertising colleagues who are looking to add Latino talent to their teams. The caller might own or work for a Hispanic market agency, or a multicultural agency or a general-market agency. He might be a headhunter hired to work with any of these agency types. In most cases, the request is simply about who I know that is talented, easy to work with and has all the right skill sets. However, in some cases, certain biases rear their ugly heads. I’m asked questions that have no business being asked in this day and age. At a time when jobs are hard to find, it pains me to believe that there are worthy candidates being passed over because of:

It's more important to be NICE

It’s more important to be NICE

Skin Color: General-market agencies are often criticized for the lack of diversity within their ranks and, in many cases, they certainly should be. But if truth be told, there are U.S. Hispanic agencies whose staff photos simply do not reflect the diversity of the U.S. Hispanic population as a whole. Black Hispanics have historically found it difficult to find acceptance within some Hispanic circles. The same holds true for the more brown-skinned Mexican-Americans or those who self-define as chicanos. Occasionally, the white, blond, blue-eyed Hispanic will also lose out on a job opportunity because he doesn’t fulfill the agencies expectations of what a Hispanic is, particularly when general-market agencies are trying to hire window dressing to check off a diversity box or create the illusion of having a Hispanic competency in-house.

Social Status: Often U.S.-born Latinos, and particularly those of Mexican descent, are judged based upon their parents’ social status, regardless of what the candidate’s U.S. social reality is. This stems from country-of-origin practices that prioritize a more European-influenced presentation skewing toward lighter hair, lighter eyes, lighter skin and a facial bone structure that does not shout “indigenous” (or doesn’t bear “la mancha de platano” as a friend of mine used to say). I know that there are Latinos in hiring positions that will rule out candidates because they remind them of the maids and cleaning ladies that were a part of their foreign-born reality. I know there are non-Latinos that will do the same based on their U.S.-born frame of reference. While the hiring of foreign-born Latinos from Argentina, Colombia and other South American countries is often discussed in terms of the need for better language skills, there are most definitely other factors, including social status, that in some agencies make a U.S.-born Latino a less desirable hire.

Accents: Of course no one is going to hire someone who can’t make themselves understood to an English-only customer base, unless the role does not require direct client contact. However, there are any number of accented Latinos who not only can make themselves understood, but also can out-think and outperform some of their non-accented co-workers. Nonetheless, over the past six months, I have received at least two calls from general-market colleagues about creative positions they were seeking to fill. And in both cases they were hoping I knew someone who “didn’t have an accent” because they didn’t feel their clients would be comfortable. On the flip side, I’ve seen clients fall head over heels in love with accented Latino creatives, deeming them to be somehow more authentic because of their accent. Sometimes the adoration is warranted because the quality of the work is that good — accent or not. But frankly, I’ve seen really poor work get pitched by heavily accented old-school salesmen and get approved because of the illusion of authenticity and therefore the implied expertise that the accent created. Perhaps worse off than the accented creative is the accented account person, who is often not considered client-worthy regardless of intellect and ability to write, present and handle the requirements of the job.

I have always found the hiring process to be complex. Resumes get screened and, no matter how free of bias one believes themselves to be, perceptions get formed based on names, colleges, who-knows-who in common, and a myriad of other pieces of information. All that before the person ever walks in the door. Then there’s the voice on the answering machine, the grammar in the e-mail and the first impression when they do finally walk in and shake your hand. Even the handshake sends its own message of strength or weakness, confidence or insecurity.

We are none of us perfect. That said, we still owe it to ourselves and each other to work at being fair and impartial. We must leave our prejudices and personal preferences at the door.

I know that every job candidate turned down for a position could cry foul regardless of ethnic or racial background. Maybe it’s age or gender. Maybe it’s the cologne he wears. Who knows? But the fact is that for Latino job candidates trying to deal with the day-to-day realities of the advertising and marketing industries (including the multicultural and U.S. Hispanic advertising agencies), there are subtle and not so subtle forms of discrimination that often go undetected or are rarely acknowledged or discussed. If putting it out there helps one person go from unemployed to employed during these most difficult of times, this blog will have served its purpose.

Source: Rochelle Newman-Carrasco – http://adage.com/bigtent/post?article_id=137503 Hispanics Face Discrimination Even Among Their Own

Older Hispanics a work force to be reckoned with

Growing pool of 55+ workers will need to be tapped: AARP

WASHINGTON (MarketWatch) — One day the recession will end, workers will be needed and the growing pool of older Hispanics may be a good option to fill job openings, according to a report released Monday by AARP.

The pool of older Hispanic workers is growing faster than the “traditional” labor pool of those between 25 and 54, the report said. And for healthy growth, employers will need to replace and add to the more than 6 million jobs that have been lost since the recession began in December 2007.

Job figures spark optimism. While job losses mounted in May, the numbers weren’t as high as expected and suggest the U.S. recession is close to an end, reports Brian Blackstone of DJ Newswires.

“Once the recession ends, employers may face a scarcity of working-age adults with the necessary skills and experience,” said Deborah Russell, AARP’s workforce issues director. “Hispanics are one of the fastest growing segments of the older population, and they can help in a big way in filling the void.”

In coming years, the traditional labor pool may grow relatively slowly and could be supplemented by older workers. Adults 25 to 54 years old will increase 2% between 2008 and 2020, while the total population grows 12%. Over that same time period, adults age 55 to 69 will increase 34%.

Older workers, who may be overlooked by employers, offer a “mature, experienced, and skilled source of labor,” according to the report.

“By ensuring that their work forces include experienced and knowledgeable older workers, employers could prevent the loss of key skills and institutional knowledge that could damage their organization’s current and future competitiveness,” according to AARP.

Further, using older workers can help employers keep labor costs down, rather than raising wages because of worker scarcity, according to the report.

“In the long term, a stagnant labor pool could slow economic growth and reduce tax revenues needed to finance government services,” according to AARP. “Older adults provide a potential solution to the looming labor shortage.”

And Hispanics are one of the fastest growing segments of the older population — the number of Hispanics 50 to 69 years old is expected to almost quadruple by 2050, according to AARP. Also, Hispanics at age 65 can expect to live three years longer than non-Hispanic whites and four years longer than non-Hispanic blacks, according to the report.

“As employers look at where there are going to be opportunities to recruit and retain workers, [older Hispanics are] a population that ought not to be overlooked,” Russell said.

She added that employers can use special outreach strategies to find these workers, who may be less available through venues such as job boards. To increase the employment prospects for older Hispanics, employers can:

•Develop recruiting materials in English and Spanish.

•Use media outlets and other channels serving Hispanics.

•Use retraining programs to transition older workers in physically demanding jobs into spots that require less physical exertion.

•Offer language and skills training to workers who are otherwise good matches for career opportunities.

•Train managers to encourage them to appreciate workplace diversity and the value of diverse viewpoints for employers.

The report is being released as part of AARP’s Diversity and Aging conference being held in Chicago this week. The report, commissioned by AARP and prepared by the Urban Institute, uses the terms Hispanic and Latino interchangeably.

 

72 percent of Hispanics use their mobile devices for overall movie planning | Hispanic mobile Consumers Study
Letting go means to come to the realization that some people are a part of your history, but not a part of your destiny #inspiration #quotes

Letting go means to come to the realization that some people are a part of your history, but not a part of your destiny #inspiration #quotes

Source: MarketWatch

Attorney: Why are Hispanics ‘last in, first out’ of jobs?

The Hispanic population in the United States has been growing substantially in recent years, providing businesses with burgeoning workforces.  The Census Bureau expects that by 2015, 17% of the American population will be of Hispanic origin. Demographically, no group of Americans is growing faster than Hispanics. Hispanics are now 8% of the workforce and by 2050, that number is expected to reach 25% of the workforce.

The sooner the debate begins to expose some of the major problems Hispanics face, the better. Hispanic immigrants, both documented and undocumented, are bearing the brunt of the new unemployment number spike. This unemployment spike is statistically significant for Hispanics, and not just the impact of recessionary unemployment among undocumented Hispanics, but among all Hispanics.

Specifically, unemployment rates for Hispanics and whites from 1976-2008 show that the unemployment gap between Hispanics and whites is stubborn, large, persistent, and is not solely related to their documentation or legal status to work in the United States.

Many places across the United States have been profoundly affected by the arrival of Hispanic immigrants – most notably the South – where documented and undocumented workers took jobs in construction and factories. While the economic troubles are widening the gap between illegal immigrants and Americans, studies show that this phenomenon occurs for all Hispanic workers, not just illegal immigrants.

According  to studies conducted by the Pew Hispanic Center and U.S. Census Bureau, Hispanic unemployment rates for the past 32 years, show a mean unemployment rate of 8.9% while the unemployment rate for whites is only 5.4%, and during this period the rates for Hispanics is always higher than for whites.

Hispanic and white unemployment rates move up and down together, with higher rates corresponding to periods of economic downturns, like the one we’re in now, and lower rates to periods of economic growth and prosperity. The unemployment rate for Hispanics is noticeably more volatile than the rate for whites.  Evidence shows that Hispanics become unemployed sooner in economic downturns that whites, experience longer periods of unemployment, that is, leave the ranks of the employed at slower rates than whites, and generally face a “riskier” labor market than whites.

Policy makers need to pay more attention to the fact that it will likely take 30 years for the Hispanic unemployment rate to equal the white unemployment rate. The slow trend and high degree of persistence suggest that closing the gap will not necessarily occur by itself (i.e. by market forces), at least not any time soon.

Politicians will need to address the forces that are causing the unemployment among this group through policy actions. Measures such as focusing on job training in industries and occupations that are traditionally less sensitive to the business cycle (e.g. education, health care, government and public service, to name a few) would be a good place to start.

Another opportunity for policy makers to close the gap, would be to focus on providing better educational opportunities for Hispanics as they are significantly underrepresented in managerial and professional occupations. Since unemployment can be subject to “last-in, first-out,” educating Hispanics on the importance of job tenure could also help close the Hispanic – white unemployment gap sooner than the 30 years market forces will take.

Quote of the Day

you only live once

you only live once

Source: Orlando Sentinel – By Angel Reyes
Angel Reyes is an attorney, Hispanic immigration expert and author of Hispanic Heresy: What is the Impact of America’s Largest Group of Immigrants? (Mead Publishing, January 2009) He is the founder and managing partner of Heygood, Orr, Reyes, Pearson & Bartolomei law firm in Dallas, Texas. He also blogs at http://www.angelreyesblog.com.

Finding the “right” Hispanic expertise for your company

Like one of my good teachers once said, “would you ask the janitor to develop your marketing strategy?” Well then, why would you ask your call center representative to create and translate your Spanish collateral materials?

How many times do managers find themselves in the position of having to hire an employee—be it for a call center, sales or marketing—and didn’t know how to go about it?

Here are some tips on how to hire the “right” Hispanic expertise

Finding the “right” Hispanic expertise for your company

Finding the “right” Hispanic expertise for your company

If you are looking for a call center representative, you need to find a person with a customer centric attitude and bilingual skills. Ah, but this is tougher than it sounds. The customer service skills are easily detectable, but how do you test the prospect’s bilingual skills in a language you do not know? My advice is to have them take a proficiency test at a local branch of a language instruction institute or a reputable foreign organization that tests Spanish language skills.

Maybe you are looking to fill a junior marketing position and you want to make sure you hire the best asset for your company. You will have to do a little research first. If the position requires a degree and your candidate’s diploma is from a foreign country, find out if the school is a reputable one for the year of graduation. You will find that many Latin American countries have better public universities than private ones. Only the brightest students are able to pass the public university tests and graduate. Some years (the economy and politics of that country have a lot to do with this) may see the best and most prepared candidates graduate. Some years might not be as good. Another nice fact to know is that most Latin American universities do not have electives or specialization in any specific area until graduation. You must look into their post-graduate studies for special skills.

To hire a senior executive position, I would strongly advice the use of an experienced recruiter that understands your expectations. Most companies believe that bringing one or two top Hispanic gurus will achieve the goal of acquiring the Hispanic market. In reality, you need to hire an executive that will also build you a good team. You must be ready and able to support his or her resources and staffing needs.

How do you find a reputable recruiter? Once again, a little research is needed. Check credentials—talk to other hiring managers—treat it as if it were a future “hire.” Make sure the recruiter specializes in “Hispanic” and works with the type of candidates you are looking for. Do not embark in a venture with a recruiter that specializes in call center staffing to find either your Director of Hispanic Marketing or a Hispanic member for your board.

If all this seems overwhelming, you may want to hire a consulting firm that can find you the right recruiter, the perfect candidates and can also assist you in developing your Hispanic marketing strategy.

great quotes | remember that your greatest talent is so much more powerful than your biggest fear

great quotes | remember that your greatest talent is so much more powerful than your biggest fear

Photo credit: Jessica Rebelo Design