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Trending Now! Adoptable Trends with Dieste

Find out more about Dieste and “Adoptable Trends,” their latest campaign for Dallas Pets Alive! Are you in?

DPA Adoptable Trends Campaign info graphic by Dieste

DPA Adoptable Trends Campaign info graphic by Dieste

To provide marketing solutions for multicultural markets is a challenge for most, especially when targeting people’s good will, but not for Dieste. Last year this award-winning multicultural marketing agency, together with Dallas Pets Alive! (DPA!) were able to help save dog’s lives through their campaign “muttbombing!” The response was so massive that got media coverage in every continent, except Antarctica.

Using the power of Instagram, selfies and Photoshop, they were able to help shelter dogs find loving homes. The campaign has been a success, with a $0 investment they helped increase the number of adoptions by 55% giving some well-deserving dogs a second chance in life.

This year Dieste has launched “Adoptable trends” – turning shelter dogs into trending topics – their brand-new campaign for Dallas Pets Alive that leverages social media and search to give new and unique names to rescued dogs and, therefore, improve their chances of being adopted. Of course, as we always admired their work and we have a huge soft spot for shelter pups, we decided to contact Dieste to find out more about their “Adoptable Trends” campaign.

The Adoptable Trends Campaign Unveiled

Q. We have been hearing a lot about your new campaign “Adoptable trends”. Could you share more about how the concept was created?

A. Shelter dogs face a harsh reality. They lack attention and online exposure for them to find a permanent home. This gave us the idea of naming the adoptable dogs after the hottest trending topics. Then, “Lemmon” became “Interrupting Kanye,” “Sadie” became the famous social media debate “What color is this dress” and by sharing about them on social media, they were able to trend and get their much needed exposure.

Q. The idea of redirecting the attention trends get towards the dogs is brilliant. But you did more than just help these dogs, didn’t you?

A. Well, yes, we wanted to give trending topics a social purpose and make shelter pups “trendy.”

Q. Tell us a bit more about your client’s cause.

A. There are 6-8 million dogs and cats entering U.S. shelters every year and only about half are adopted. The other half is not as lucky. On top of that some shelters euthanize animals after a few weeks. Our clients’ mission is to promote and provide the resources, education and programs needed to eliminate the killing of companion animals.

Q. And now that they are trending what have the results been so far?

A. These are partial results as the campaign is still “live.” The average Twitter engagement performance for the “Adoptable Trends” campaign has almost doubled (from 2% before the campaign to 3.7% during the campaign, as of now.) The average engagement on campaign related posts is of 6.2%. From February 14th to March 23rd, the #AdoptableTrends has reached 751,725 Impressions. Traffic to the site has almost doubled and we had four times more adoptions than with last year’s campaign.

Q. Truly impressive. Now, let’s talk about Dieste. What do you consider to be your core strengths?

A. Our core strength is as simple as a twitter post: Dieste develops creative solutions and services to grow our clients’ businesses.

Q. What differentiates you from other Hispanic Marketing agencies in the market?

A. Two things mark the difference. Our very talented people and the fresh approach we take to Multicultural Marketing. We call it Multicultural Marketing Re-imagined. We have a data-driven process that uses quantitative storytelling and genuine cultural insights to deliver results. No anecdotes. No stereotypes. Data.

Thank you, Dieste, for these extraordinary, powerful, and engaging campaigns. We look forward to seeing more of your fantastic work!!!

We thought these adorable pups deserved even more exposure, so we are featuring them on our site as well.

Adoptable trends campaign by Dieste

Adoptable trends campaign by Dieste

If you’d like to know more about turning shelter dogs into trending topics, visit Adoptabletrends.com or search in social media for the #adoptabletrends hashtag.

Hispanic Acculturation Secrets Unveiled

At the Governor's Mansion Claudia Goffan with Gov. Sam Brownback after Hispanic Day on the Hill

At the Governor’s Mansion Claudia Goffan with Gov. Sam Brownback after Hispanic Day on the Hill

Hispanic Acculturation secrets were unveiled at the Keynote Speech given by Claudia Goffan, Hispanic Marketing expert and Target Latino CEO, at Hispanic Day on the Hill and she reveals some of them on this article.

As you may be aware, the Kansas Hispanic & Latino American Affairs Commission, with the office of Governor Sam Brownback, proclaimed Hispanic Day on the Hill at the Capitol in Topeka, Kansas that this year took place on April 1st- a day wherein Hispanics from Kansas come together to obtain updated information on key policy and meet with their legislators at the Capitol, and I was called to deliver a keynote speech on Hispanic marketing.

First of all, I’d like to thank the Kansas Hispanic and Latino American Affairs Commission with the office of Governor Sam Brownback for selecting me as their keynote speaker for such an important event for both their Latino and political communities. I was truly honored by the request.

I would also like to extend a special thanks to Adrienne Foster, Executive Director of KHLAAC and Mayor of Roeland Park, for organizing such an outstanding and highly attended event and for making me feel so welcome and introducing me to such a distinguished group of people.

I was positively impressed by Governor Sam Brownback who opened his home to us, for his eagerness to learn and understand the issues that concern the Kansas Latino community and Latinos in general.

I was overwhelmed by the impact my presentation made and the number of positive comments received from the audience. I hope the understanding of cultural differences and similarities continues as I see the impact it could exponentially have in the immediate future on the improvement of relationships with Latinos in Kansas and in the rest of the United States.

The audience was entertained and surprised when they found out that every 30 seconds a U.S. Hispanic turns 18 years old. Happy birthday!!! By the sheer numbers alone, the Hispanic market has become a key demographic, not just in states like California, Florida, Texas and New York but in Kansas as well.

The Kansas landscape has changed dramatically since the 2000 U.S. Census. The state’s Hispanic population grew by 59 percent over the past decade. There are over 301,000 Hispanics that reside in Kansas – the 17th largest Hispanic population share nationally- and more than 37% of them are eligible to vote (higher than North Carolina with only 24%). And while U.S. Hispanics have a purchasing power of $1.2 trillion as of 2012, Kansas Latinos purchasing power is $5.6 billion and Kansas Hispanic businesses generated $1.3 billion in 2012.

Hispanic households spend almost as much as general market households and they earn about 70% of what these earn. Therefore and in relative terms, Hispanic households spend more. (Hispanic households spend approximately $40,123 each year, compared to $46,409 for general U.S. households. This gap is shrinking at a very fast pace)

Unfortunately, many of America’s corporations – and it is definitely not limited to them – hang on to stereotypes instead of learning about the Hispanic culture and how it shapes the identity of Hispanic consumers and their communities. This disconnect makes it difficult for these companies to build trust, truly engage with, and begin to value U.S. Hispanics as viable consumers. After all, the ability to identify with an advertisement or a message is affected by identification with a society or the culture of that society.

And what is culture but a mental map which guides us in our relations to our surroundings and to other people? It may be tied to ethnicity on occasions but not necessarily so. Thus, the culture of people that live in the city will be different that the ones that live in a farm and so on. Understanding Hispanic acculturation becomes crucial to understanding the Hispanic culture tapestry that has been weaved in the U.S. and makes it different from the ones in their respective countries of origin.

Several years ago, I shared an article on the Hispanic Acculturation process and understanding segmentation on this same blog. Today, these circles still represent culture more than ever. Not segments. Not slices of the population. Cultures. Everybody in the Venn diagram below is Hispanic and depicting today’s reality that about 70% of Hispanics are bi-culturals (and bilinguals to a certain degree) why are we still debating on what language to address this population and not concentrating on what message will resonate better depending on the level of Hispanic Acculturation? Bi-culturals have two sets of cultures, two sets of maps with which to interpret behaviors, messages, thoughts and everything they do as members of a society.

Hispanic Acculturation Process

Hispanic Acculturation Process

Bi-cultural Hispanics have two sets of codes and they can switch between them just as they can switch languages but only one can be prevalent at a time. Culture works in the same way than language. It can even be mixed and matched, conjugated, re-invented. Understanding Hispanic acculturation is one of the elements to understanding U.S. Hispanics. But remember that no one knows their own culture fully and to understand culture, you have to understand other cultures and their similarities and differences.

Of course, these are just a few of the Hispanic acculturation secrets. I promise there will be more in the future. Meanwhile, I hope that what has begun here is a long lived effort and the example is followed by many others.

Thoughts of the Day

To be kind is more important than to be right

To be kind is more important than to be right

all the secrets in the world are contained in books

all the secrets in the world are contained in books

Next Quote? funny inspirational quotes on every post! | Latinos in Kansas to Have Hispanic Day on the Hill

Hispanic mobile consumers study

As Hollywood looks to drive waning movie ticket sales, their focus should be on the growing Hispanic population and their use of mobile devices throughout the movie-planning process. This insight comes from research within The Mobile Consumer: Hispanics, Movies & Mobile, a new report by multicultural marketing agency Briabe Mobile and MocoSpace, the largest entertainment destination on the mobile Internet.

Hispanics attend movies more frequently than other racial demographics, and they're using their mobile devices to find theaters, movie times and reviews.

Hispanics attend movies more frequently than other racial demographics, and they’re using their mobile devices to find theaters, movie times and reviews.

Based on the results from a June 2011 survey of MocoSpace users, the study revealed Hispanics attend movies more frequently than other racial demographics, and they’re using their mobile devices to find theaters, movie times and reviews.

Hispanics are known to be a driving force for tickets sales. A recent Nielsen study found Hispanics make up approximately 15 percent of the U.S. population, but they represent 28 percent of today’s frequent moviegoers. This study echoed those findings, but also had key findings about Hispanics’ movie-attending habits.

Key findings for Hispanic mobile consumers include the following:

  • 75 percent of Hispanics go to the movie theater once a month, 25 percent see movies three times a month. This is more often than all other polled ethnic demographics.
  • Hispanic Americans use their phones for almost every part of the film-discovery process. 72 percent use their mobile devices for overall movie planning. Of those:
    • 65 percent use their mobile devices to find showtimes and locations
    • 39 percent use it to view trailers
    • 35 percent use it to discover movies
    • 28 percent use it to get reviews
    • 14 percent use it to buy tickets
  • 55 percent use their phones to access movie information within the four hours just prior to seeing a movie.

Not only are Hispanics using their phones to seek out movie information, the report found they’re influenced by mobile advertisements, too. One out of four interviewed said they look to search and mobile banner ads when deciding what film to see. After viewing a film, 55 percent of Hispanics said they discuss their opinion of the movie on social networks.

72 percent of Hispanics use their mobile devices for overall movie planning | Hispanic mobile Consumers Study

Hispanic mobile Consumers Study | 72 percent of Hispanics use their mobile devices for overall movie planning

Photo credit: VentureBeat

you are entitled to your informed opinion

you are entitled to your informed opinion

Sears Goes Social with Hispanics

Sears recently announced several social media efforts aimed at the Hispanic market, including new Facebook and Twitter programs. (It already has three separate Hispanic Web sites, including SearsPR, launched last year, which ships merchandise only to the island of Puerto Rico.)

Sears Goes Social with Hispanics

Sears Goes Social with Hispanics

Marketing Daily caught up with Oscar H. Castro, director/general manager of international e-commerce, for more details on how the Hoffman Estates, Ill.-based retailer hopes to woo the rapidly growing, social-media loving Hispanic market:

Sears Goes Social with Hispanics

Q: How do Hispanic shoppers differ in terms of social media use?

A: Social media is such an important channel for us right now; Hispanic growth on Facebook is eight times larger than the general population, and we know that Hispanic consumers spend more time on it each week as well. So for us, it seems the best thing to do is work with that higher level of engagement. We’re not creating these forums to push products so much as to build stronger relationships. And it’s pretty exciting. In two weeks we’ve gotten 16,000 fans, and a great level of engagement.

Q: But does that mean there is also an increased appetite for retail in social media?

A: Yes, I think Hispanic culture really is different about shopping. It’s much more of a family activity; the whole family goes out to the mall. They are more social about shopping, in general. They want to have more conversations. We want to join the conversation.

Q: Are there gender differences?

A: Well, younger Latinas are more likely to shop online than older women, or men. But other than that, there are not a lot of major differences.

Q: Is it effective for a marketer as large as Sears to focus on a single Hispanic market, when there are so many submarkets?

A: There are so many differences, and that’s what makes Hispanic marketing so difficult. Facebook is a great equalizer, and you can have general conversations with broader appeal. But there are many cultural nuances. What works for a Dominican audience may not for a Mexican one. So some of our efforts are extremely local.

We launched SearsPR.com last year to serve only the Puerto Rican market. We use local terminology, and a completely separate marketing program. Sears offers 290 million products online, and of course, our mission is to help our customer find things anytime, anywhere. But there are items on this site you can’t find in the continental U.S.

Q: Why so many different initiatives?

A: This market is large and projected to grow even further, and we are leaders in it. It’s not going to be a niche market, it’s going to be the U.S. market. And I can’t think of too many brands that have been very effective. McDonald’s now leads with its diversity insights, and Coca-Cola has done a great job in the Latino market. And I think we’ll see more Latin brands crossing over into the mainstream — like Corona beer.

A reminder

A reminder

Why Marketers Should Care About Reaching Latina Bloggers

Speaking about Latina Bloggers is Elianne Ramos is the principal and CEO of Speak Hispanic Communications and vice-chair of Communications and PR for LATISM.

Elianne Ramos is the principal and CEO of Speak Hispanic Communications and vice-chair of Communications and PR for LATISM.

The first gift of the season goes to my dear friend, Elianne Ramos.:)  Elianne is an incredibly talented, knowledgeable, and hard working human being, she is the Principal & CEO of Speak Hispanic communications and vice-chair of Communications and PR for Latinos in Social Media (LATISM.) She is constantly on the go, generating great ideas and positively impacting the U.S. community. As if this wasn’t enough, she was the vice president, creative director and founder of i3 Creative Group, managing production teams working concurrently in the United States, Mexico, Uruguay and Argentina. In over 15 years of  creative direction, copy writing, public speaking, public relations and TV commercial production experience, Elianne has developed broadcast, multimedia and social media campaigns for high-profile clients. Her writing has appeared in numerous books and publications including the Chicken Soup for the Soul series and now, for the first time-ever, on the Hispanic Marketing blog.

Please, enjoy Elianne’s article. Elianne, this one is with all of the Target Latino love.

Why Marketers Should Care About Reaching Latina Bloggers

Even with the well-documented explosion of the Hispanic market, Internet sources like Technorati, which by 2008 was indexing 112.8 million blogs, have never touched upon the topic of Latinas and blogging. With the release of the Latinos in Social Media’s Latina Blogger Survey, though, it is now official: Latina bloggers are increasing their numbers and spreading throughout the blogosphere.

The intrinsic characteristics of blogging, where the private becomes public and communities rally together around common interests, make it the perfect platform for Latinas to voice life from their viewpoint … in in two languages, no less!

Beyond the obviously good news that these bloggers now provide us with a new outlet for furthering our brands’ messages—what with ever-shrinking minority-outreach budgets—the implications of this Latina blogger explosion for PR and marketing professionals are many:

The Good

• In Latino culture, where word-of-mouth and group interaction are second-nature, the trustworthiness of a blog post wrapped in a culturally relevant package can certainly influence the value of a brand in the eyes of their thousands of followers.

• These bloggers provide us with micro-niche audiences and more targeted outlets for furthering our brands’ messages. Stories published and promoted online have the potential to reach a greater number of people in very little time. In this context, a Latina blogger outreach program puts us in an ideal position to secure widespread coverage for our clients.

• Most Latinas blog in English, followed closely by Spanish and peppered with Spanglish, which means that their potential reach is amplified. Their choice of language in this case may be more about connecting with their readership, not necessarily a reflection of the language they speak more fluently. The key is listening and doing your homework in order to find the perfect fit.

• Latina bloggers are actively engaged in social media, and they tend to belong to tight, supportive communities online. Besides the fact that your message will reach well beyond the scope of the blog, this also means that other influencers in their communities will help disseminate it.

• Their culture infuses their writing but does not rule it.  Contrary to expectations, Latinas blog about numerous subjects, which opens up possibilities for different types of brand engagement.

• These Latinas are at the epicenter of merging worlds: between traditional and modern roles, between English and Spanish, between American and Latino cultures. They will bring a fresh perspective to your message, one that most closely reflects the Latina experience in the US.

The Bad

• Brand credibility: With consumers now doing research online and even generating their own content, consumers are less likely to believe a product review that blatantly comes from a sponsorship.

• Relative lack of control over the message: Know that consumers will be getting and act on impressions about your brand from less than perfect sources. Bloggers are not necessarily a self-regulating bunch, at least not yet. The fact that they can and will write whatever they want in their blog might create public relations issues. Just be sure to monitor their blogs, so you can address any issues or comments and give your official brand perspective, if need be.

• Saturation: With the fast growth rate of this segment, the Latina blogger market is likely to become saturated fast, which means their individual reach will, at some point and with few exceptions, start to diminish. This being a relatively young blogging community also means that the time to reach out to them is now.

The Ugly

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is cracking down on so-called “Blogola” by regulating blogger/advertiser relationships. The rules were updated December 2009.

The new rules include the fact that now bloggers must disclose material connections with a brand: whether they are receiving payment or free products and the kind of relationship they have with the company. What’s more, now both the brand and the blogger are subject to liability for misleading or unsubstantiated representations made. This means that the potential of a company being held responsible for approving unfounded claims—not rare in this realm—is a very real one. While the FTC regulations are beginning to be applied, the blogger outreach game is still an evolving one. The main things to keep in mind seem to be transparency, clear objectives and open ears: a willingness to listen and adjust, if need be.

Though a blogging campaign may be a godsend of great, relatively inexpensive publicity, remember that it is also —or should be—part of a larger communications/PR plan. Make sure all other elements of the campaign support your Latina blogging outreach and vice versa. If you do it right, Latina blogueras will rally behind your efforts with the same pasión they pour into their Web writing every day.

What has been your experience in reaching out to Latina bloggers? Please share in the comments below.

inspirational quote

inspirational quote

Target Latino gives the gift of WOM this holiday season

We, at Target Latino, have decided to spread a little cheer this Holiday Season. And we want to give the gift of recognition and help promote our colleagues that have worked so brilliantly and hard this year to write their great articles on Hispanics / Latinos and, even better, Hispanic marketing.

So, if you would like us to give you this gift, send us your favorite article on Hispanic Marketing, Social Media, Latino life, demographics, anything related to the Latino community along with a short bio (photo, if you want) and we will do the rest!!! We’ll post it, promote it and credit you for being WHO YOU ARE!!!

Thank you for participating and allowing us to give, at least a little, on this Holiday Season!!

May the year that comes be even better than the one we are now!!!

With all the Target Latino love,

Claudia “Havi” Goffan

PS: Please, send us an email via the Target Latino page or via the contact form on the blog and we will reply so you can send us the rest of the materials!!!

never lose your sense of wonder

never lose your sense of wonder

Multicultural Is the New Mainstream

Multicultural is the New Mainstream

Multicultural is the New Mainstream

The U.S. population is becoming increasingly diverse, and while statistics aren’t really necessary to confirm the obvious, the soon-to-be-released 2010 U.S. Census figures likely will support the multicultural boom over the past decade.  Last week, national advertisers and marketers convened at a conference to discuss the implications of today’s broad and progressively more complex marketplace.  Identifying “best practices” for communicating with multicultural consumers, some presenters indicated that a singular insight focused on commonalities between cultural segments should drive marketing strategy; however, the voice of Hispanic-specialized agencies, the Association of Hispanic Advertising Agencies (AHAA), disagrees with this one-size-fits-all approach.

“Trying to be all things to all consumers not only waters down the communication but also waters down the results,” says Jessica Pantanini, AHAA chair and COO of Bromley Communications.  “The population is definitely more multicultural but that only reinforces the need for customized, one-to-one communication.  It’s more impactful than mass marketing as evidenced by the obvious success of digital and social interactive media.  The growing diversity of the country requires even more insight and understanding of the cultural and ethnic nuances and differences that drive behavior and purchase, and connect with consumers in a unique way.”

AHAA is concerned that advertisers’ request for a holistic approach to marketing and advertising to all segments and the need for a single voice is possibly being misinterpreted to minimize the need for targeted and highly specialized communication. This type of cross-cultural approach lacks insight and understanding critical to the effectiveness of the strategy.  “If one-size-fits-all worked, then fashion designers would have it easy,” Pantanini says.  “Manufacturing costs would go way down, savings could be passed to the consumer and profitability would increase.  It’s great in theory, but it just doesn’t work in the marketplace.

The journey of a Latina Millennial mom is one example.  Her experience is very different from other cultures.  Rather than being the child who was given a trophy for every activity, which would lead her to become more ‘me’ focused; it was the hard work of her parents and the respect that she has for them that has driven her to succeed.

So, while the general market, cross-cultural approach might consider ‘me’-focused behavior the point of convergence for all Millenial moms and therefore execute one communication strategy, the approach won’t resonate with the Latina mom.  In fact, the more inspirational way of talking to Millennials may just be through the Latina insight.  “The goal should be to bring the insight to the strategy, and if the granularity demands a separate communication, so be it,” Pantanini says.  “If not, fine; but the cultural sensitivity must be part of the strategy.

“The U.S. is a salad bowl and not a mixing bowl.  Multicultural consumers are blended into the population but they retain their own unique cultural traits, behaviors and innate desires that influence their responses, purchasing and loyalty.  To ignore this in the name of cost-cutting and consolidation or leaving it to the agencies to figure it out will impact negatively advertisers’ return on investments.”

Multicultural Marketing

Multicultural Marketing

Inclusion, AHAA agrees with advertisers, is the answer; however, it requires bringing Hispanic-market or multicultural specialists in at the beginning of the marketing planning process as strategic thinkers and not just tactical implementers.  Consumer connection and cultural insight is integral to the strategy and helps build the bottom line for brands.

Savvy marketers like General Mills, McDonalds and Time Inc., understand the value of cultural marketing specialists and targeted communication, and have the profits to show for their decisions. Rudy Rodriguez, director, Multicultural Marketing for General Mills says the focus on Hispanic and African American market segments has driven growth for many of the company’s brands.  The packaged food manufacturer has increased investments in these segments progressively over the past four years and Rodriguez says they will continue to invest heavily.

AHAA agrees that the best marketing ideas should win clients’ approval, but the effectiveness of any agency — specialized or general market — relies on an environment conducive to the exchange of information and support for great ideas no matter where they emanate.  Unfortunately, some advertisers may be misguided in the approach and strategies that will achieve bottom line profits when reaching and connecting with multicultural consumers.  Targeted communication, rather than one-size-fits-all marketing, really works.  Finding a successful partnership with a quality Hispanic-specialized expert agency delivers results.

 

So very true

So very true

 

SOURCE Association of Hispanic Advertising Agencies

Wendy’s Launches Hispanic Campaign

Wendy's hispanic campaign launched

Wendy’s Launches Campaign for Hispanic Consumer Market

Wendy’s International, Inc. is rolling out a new series of television and radio commercials targeting the U.S. Hispanic market.

Themed “Sabor de Verdad,” roughly translating to “Real Taste,” the Spanish-language campaign is the first Wendy’s effort from WPP Group’s Miami-based The Bravo Group, which was chosen by the QSR in August as its new Hispanic agency of record.

Timed to coincide with Wendy’s expansion of its 99-cent Everyday Value Menu offerings, the campaign positions Wendy’s as the solution for Hispanic consumers looking to satisfy their “antojos,” or taste cravings, with quality food at affordable prices.

The campaign, which starts Nov. 1 and will run through year-end, will include a series of TV spots airing on national network and cable and local spot TV, plus local radio efforts run at the discretion of individual markets. Some of the television media being employed are Univision, Telefutura, Galavision, Telemundo, mun2, Estrella, TVAztecaAmerica, Discovery en Español, MTVTr3s, Fox Sports en Español and ESPN Deporte. Wendy’s Hispanic media planning and buying continue to be handled by MediaVest and MV42.

The campaign centers on a Hispanic couple, “Cesar and Gabriela.” In the first TV spot, they are seen ordering from the value menu at a Wendy’s drive-through. After Cesar orders a “papapolloguesa,” which Gabriela doesn’t recognize on the menu, it becomes clear that he has combined three products into one: baked potato, Crispy Chicken Sandwich and Double Stack burger.

The current efforts do not include digital/social media support. New Hispanic creative will roll out in 2011, according to Wendy’s and Bravo Group, which is working with Wendy’s general-market agency of record, Kaplan Thaler Group, to ensure that efforts both resonate with Hispanics and are integrated into the brand’s overall marketing and positioning.

“Sabor de Verdad” will serve as a platform for a long-term campaign in which Wendy’s will seek to “build faith” with its growing Hispanic consumer base by delivering on its goal of being “the real choice in fast food,” summed up Wendy’s SVP brand marketing Bob Holtcamp.

Nielsen shows Wendy’s having spent $25 million in major Hispanic media last year and $8 million during first-half 2010, according to Brandweek.

Wendy’s is far from alone: Many QSRs, including Burger King and Carl’s Jr., are beefing up Hispanic marketing. Hispanics have become the most important U.S. demographic growth-driver for restaurants, as well as food and beverage makers, according to Latinum Network market research.

While they are spending more than the general population on food consumed at home, they are also eating out more in both fast-food and full-service restaurants, even as other segments are cutting back on restaurant expenditures. Hispanics also are increasingly likely to eat out during the work day, offering breakfast and lunch opportunities for QSRs and other restaurant formats.

Moreover, Hispanics, African-Americans and Asian-Americans tend to originate food and cultural trends subsequently adopted by the general market. This dynamic has caused McDonald’s, which has been running minority-specific marketing campaigns for more than three decades, to employ insights about minority group preferences to help shape menu selections and advertising efforts intended for general-market consumption, reports Bloomberg BusinessWeek.

let your imagination go

let your imagination go

Beware the Professional Hispanic

This is a post by Alberto Ferrer that I found to be so much along my lines of thought that I was compelled to post it on my blog. If you are interested in this subject you may read the article I authored: Finding the “right” Hispanic expertise for your company – May 2008

Thank you Alberto!!

Beware the Professional Hispanic: Professional Hispanics are folks who are Hispanic and have chosen their ethnicity as their profession.

Beware the Professional Hispanic: Professional Hispanics are folks who are Hispanic and have chosen their ethnicity as their profession.

In my previous post, I discussed the danger to clients of the mainstream agency’s Hispanic-acquisition practice of “poach the junior talent at Hispanic shops by promoting them beyond their capabilities.” Catchy, isn’t it? The point was that the same individual who a client might not have invited to planning meetings, for example, the next day might be in charge of that very planning.

A related practice exists in the client ranks and it is equally dangerous and even more pervasive in the industry. The practice is that of the Professional Hispanic vs. the Hispanic Professional.

Professional Hispanics have been around for a long time in the Hispanic Marketing world, but are becoming more widespread with the growth in importance and prevalence of Hispanic Marketing in organizations.

Professional Hispanic Defined

Professional Hispanics are folks who are Hispanic and have chosen their ethnicity as their profession. They have no specific expertise in Hispanic Marketing (or even marketing per se, for that matter) but rather ride the ethnicity of their name to define and build their career.

They can come from all walks of life in a client organization and from all levels. However, they are usually from junior levels because (a) the organizations that choose these folks to lead their Hispanic Marketing are usually companies that don’t value Hispanic that much and thus have these positions at relatively low levels in the organization, and (b) these same organizations are not those where Hispanics have reached high positions in the company.

Professional Hispanics usually see the market with very old-fashioned, traditional eyes (what they remember from growing up) rather than seeing it as the vibrant, ever-changing, dynamic, complex space it actually is. They tend to prefer things like street festivals and local radio. This is because they are not really marketers and thus do not continue learning about the market, changing with it, experimenting with it, etc. They continue using their personal experience as a filter, not realizing that their own selves 10 to 15 years ago are not the target.

Hispanic Professional Defined

Hispanic Professionals are good marketers who understand their target market, are experts in engaging with the target, exhibit savvy communications decision-making, etc. They just happen to be Hispanic and working in Hispanic Marketing at their organizations.

These folks have passion for what they do and believe in the potential of the Hispanic market. They usually come from marketing and communications backgrounds and have the experience and education of solid marketing professionals.

The key difference is that while Professional Hispanics ride their culture and ethnicity to career advancement, Hispanic Professionals leverage their efforts, experience and expertise. Do multicultural marketers have to belong to a particular ethnic group? That’s for another post.

I would defer to my fellow bloggers on this issue, but I would not be surprised if this issue was the same in terms of marketing to Black and Asian-American targets.

Appointing Professional Hispanics to these marketing posts is a risky proposition for clients. They are in effect putting a key portion of their marketing in the hands of unqualified people. They will end up with bland, ineffective, uninspired me-too marketing to Hispanics.

We all know how difficult it is to find good Hispanic Professionals in this tight talent environment. However, I strongly recommend to client organizations that they look harder and deeper for the right people, design the positions at the appropriate levels of responsibility and compensation, and monitor their performance more closely.

At our agency, when evaluating potential client relationships, this is one of the factors we consider. The multicultural markets are just too important to most companies’ bottom line to leave that up to folks whose only Hispanic expertise lies in their name or ethnicity. Invest in hiring the right people and enjoy the full benefits of the opportunity these markets have to offer

illuminate the world - inspirational quote Oprah

illuminate the world – inspirational quote Oprah

Next Quote? funny inspirational quotes on every post!

US Hispanics to spend $257 billion in Telecom

US Hispanics Will Spend $257 Billion on Telecommunications Services over the Next Five Years, Says Insight Research Corp.

The US Latino market tends to over-index in mobile content and US Hispanics are accessing the Internet through more and varied devices than non-Hispanics. Are you monitoring what they say about their Telecom services?

The US Latino market tends to over-index in mobile content and US Hispanics are accessing the Internet through more and varied devices than non-Hispanics. Are you monitoring what they say about their Telecom services?

BOONTON, N.J., June 28 — Over the next five years, US Hispanic communities will spend $257 billion on telecommunications services, accounting for 17 percent of all residential telecom expenditures, according to a new market research study from The Insight Research Corporation. Early analysis of Census 2010 data suggests that Hispanics will surpass the 50 million mark and that they will command over $1 trillion in buying power. Hispanics are the youngest race/ethnicity segment and, more importantly, have the largest percentage of people under the age of 18, a market demographic that the study says will be crucial to the survival of telecommunications providers over the next five years.

Insight Research’s market analysis study, “US Hispanic Use of Telecommunications Services 2010-2015,” takes a close look at the purchasing habits and telecommunications usage patterns of the Hispanic segment of the US population, as well as other ethnic communities in the US. The study emphasizes that the US Latino market tends to over-index in mobile content and also notes that US Hispanics are accessing the Internet through more and varied devices than non-Hispanics.

“If the future of mobile carriers depends on their getting consumers to buy their data plans, then the US Hispanic community is right in the sweet spot, and will be receiving increasing attention from both wireline and wireless carriers’ marketing departments,” says Robert Rosenberg, Insight Research. “Our study demonstrates that Hispanics are one of the most social groups online, and given the youth-orientated demographic of the US Hispanic community, they become a prime target for the newer 3G and 4G cellular services,” Rosenberg concluded.

“US Hispanic Use of Telecommunication Services 2010-2015” examines spending and usage patterns of US Hispanics for wireline, cellular, and pre-paid cellular services, and compares these spending patterns to those of the general population aswell as other minority segments, including Asian-Americans and African-Americans.

An excerpt of this Hispanic market research report, table of contents, and ordering information are online at www.insight-corp.com/reports/hisp10.asp .

NEWS SOURCE: Insight Research Corporation

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