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Uncovered Facts About Online Hispanic Women and their Media Usage

Are you considering going after the online Hispanic women market? Here’s all your questions on their online media usage answered but to find out you must read every word of this comprehensive report.

Online Hispanic women are social networking butterflies

Online Hispanic women are social networking butterflies

One of the main factors that decisively affects business profitability and ROI is market share. The connection between market share and profitability has been recognized by scholars, business executives and consultants.

Hispanic women in the U.S will reach 51 million by 2050 and will make up 25% of the total U.S female population by 2050, according to Hispan Telligence.

If we add the fact that U.S. Hispanics are ahead of the curve when it comes to digital, they lead in adoption of new devices, are power users of mobile and over-index in video consumption, the conclusion is clear. It’s time to pay attention to the online Hispanic women market.

Hispanic women RULE in digital

Many brands believe that the only places to reach online Hispanic women are lifestyle magazines, celebrity gossip and mommy sites. While these sites are very effective in reaching them, Hispanic women trace their own path and can be found in other online properties in droves and we will cover these shortly. You just have to know where to look.

Check Out These Uncovered Facts About Online Hispanic Women and their Media Usage

Uncovered Facts About Online Hispanic Women and their Media Usage

Online Hispanic women are social networking butterflies

Hispanic women of all ages engage in a multitude of online activities, such as blogging, photo-sharing, gaming, video viewing and instant messaging. Mobile social networking is a habitual practice in the lives of today’s women.

Social retail, clearly demonstrated by the percentage of women that participate on Pinterest and because it combines two activities that are already firmly embedded in the daily activity of online women, is the next logical step in this evolution.

Women transact online more than men

In the U.S., currently the largest e-commerce market in the world, women are the key drivers of online buying. More women than men conduct business online and, collectively, they spend more. Women account for 85% of consumer purchases (She-conomy) and 58% of U.S. ecommerce spend but in spite of this, 91% of women say advertisers don’t understand them.

Differences between women and men on Social Networks

Even when their online behavior is similar, motivations can differ widely between the two genders. The adoption of Twitter is a great example – both genders adopted this technology at similar rates, but for different purposes. Men are far more likely to post their own Tweets than women. Meanwhile, a larger percentage of female Twitter users say they use the site to find deals and promotions. Women are also more likely to use the service as a conversation medium, to ask for help from other users and to follow celebrities. (comScore)

Online Hispanic Women Social Media and Other Web Media Use

Girls dominate visual platforms - Pew Internet 2015

Girls dominate visual platforms – Pew Internet 2015

Social Media Networks with the largest incidence of Hispanic demographics are Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest.

Facebook

73% of adult Latino internet users (18+ years old) say they have a Facebook account with a slightly higher Hispanic women presence in the social network. (Pew Research Center 2014)

Twitter

25% of Hispanics are on Twitter versus a 21% of non-Hispanic whites. The site’s reach is marginally higher among men than among women. Still, this is a great network to reach a college-educated, affluent, and urbanite demographic.

Instagram, Flickr, Other Photo Sharing Sites

Hispanic women surpass men in every age group in both reach and time spent on photo sites. They were also much faster to adopt photo sharing when it first reached the market.

SnapChat tends to be used by wealthier teenagers - Pew Internet 9-4-15

SnapChat tends to be used by wealthier teenagers – Pew Internet 9-4-15

Instagram has the largest percentage of Hispanics out of all other social networks. 34% of Instagram users are Hispanics, a much higher percentage than their white counterpart (21%). This demographic skews much younger, especially in the 18 to 29 years old segment. Besides young adults, women are particularly likely to be on Instagram, along with those who live in urban or suburban environments.

Pinterest

Pinterest does not fall behind on the Hispanic forefront. Definitely the Queendom of women, with 21% of Hispanic Pinterest users, looking for inspiration, this is “the” place to be. The first social commerce network (I really hate calling it a social network as Pinterest has always been so much more than that and by the way, don’t miss out on these outstanding Pinterest for Business statistics when you are done reading this article. If you are not active on it, you will want to be.)

To sum up: Women dominate Pinterest with 42% of online women using the platform, compared with 13% of online men.

SnapChat

Did you know that 70% of SnapChat users are women? And they are a very young demographic. Now, let’s do the math. There’s a much higher incidence of Hispanics on Gen Y and Gen Z than on any other generation. If you have not considered a SnapChat campaign for your Latina teens, you may be missing the mark.

Read What Everybody Ought To Know about the Latino market to discover even more

LinkedIn

LinkedIn seems to rank low on Hispanic demographics with just an 18 percent of adult Hispanics but if you are looking for online Hispanic women who are college-graduates and between the ages 30-64, then this is your site.

Remember that users are becoming more and more multiplatform and if you find them on Pinterest, it is highly likely you will also find them on Twitter and Facebook.

Source: September 2014, the Pew Research Center

Online Video Sites

59% of all Hispanics are on YouTube and 72% of Hispanic Americans using YouTube’s app. By the same token, YouTube has the higher share of viewed minutes for online women.

Universal has a Universal Latino YouTube channel dedicated channel to online Hispanics. You can read more about their success in driving this audience on this article.

Online Streaming

Latinos stream way more online TV than their white counterparts, according to Nielsen: “Latinos on average watch 6 hours and 22 minutes of online video per month, whereas white viewers clock 3 hours and 44 minutes on average.”

There are several players in this field.

Hulu Latino, has been developing its own original content. Hulu Original Latino Series ‘East Los High’ Receives Three Daytime Emmy Nominations. They are partners with Univision, Galavision and Telefutura. In 2012, Hulu Latino added shows from new partners Azteca America, Butaca, Caracol Televisión, Comarex, Estrella TV, Imagina US, Laguna Productions, Maya Entertainment, RCTV, Todobebe Inc and Venevision.

MiTu Latino is a multi-channel streaming network that receives over 100 million views per month and in just two years it amassed an audience of more than 36 million subscribers.

mun2, re-branded as NBC Universo on February 1, 2015, was the fastest growing Hispanic cable network with women 18-49 in total day Monday -Sunday 6a.m.- 2a.m., +8% year-over-year.  The network continued its double-digit growth with women. Source: Nielsen Media Research.

Radio

We cannot skip online radio, so we’ll take a look at the Pandora demographics. These are mostly Hispanics Males/Females younger than 24yrs old no college, some grad school, income range $0 – 55k, no kids. This is a very young demographic.

Hispanic Women and Online Search

Language used by Hispanic women to surf the web

Language used by Latinas to surf the web

“Latinas search in English for information in Spanish. Beyond language, a majority (62 percent) of Latinas wish for more lifestyle information about Latinas online, and over sixty percent want more lifestyle information written in Spanish. When Latinas search for Latino subject matter online, recipes top the list, followed by news, music, family health, beauty and celebrations.” Source: Comscore

Google is the most popular search engine among both genders but their behavior on Bing displays an interesting behavioral twist. In general, men perform a higher number of search queries than women (71.6 searches per searcher for men vs. 64.0 for women). When it comes down to Bing, Hispanic women perform a much higher number of searches than males that use this search engine do.

Google has seen the number of Google search queries that include common Spanish-language question words nearly double over the past 3 years. If you still think of “Hispanic Marketing” as “Spanish Marketing,” it’s time to re-evaluate your knowledge of this market. Looking for Spanish SEO or Spanish Inbound marketing will not help you capture a solid market share of the Hispanic market in the U.S., unless you only want to target this particular Hispanic market segment. But remember that even people who have recently immigrated to the U.S. will eventually be searching in English, Spanish and Spanglish.

Combine cultural relevance with language to get to the winning formula. – Havi Goffan

Why you need a Hispanic Inbound Marketing Agency

Hispanic Women market Opportunities & Challenges

I wouldn’t end this article without providing some tips and data regarding the Hispanic women market. Here are a few of the market’s opportunities and challenges.

Opportunities

  • Once a brand is identified as a trustworthy one, Hispanic women will share the news with family, friends, co-workers and this might lead these reference groups to continue the buzz about the brand around their own set of groups.
  • Customer relationship management is another important aspect to consider when marketing to Hispanics. Both from a cultural and language perspectives, this audience deserves careful consideration. The last thing a business should do is generate interest in their products or services to lose them once they form part of the customer-base.
  • Coupons have an influence on the Latino consumer’s decision.
  • Latina Bloggers have a strong influence in the purchasing decisions of many Hispanic moms.
  • 33% of Hispanic moms claim to have learned more about products and brands from online ads than from traditional media. Don’t forget internet ads!
  • Hispanic women are also more open to companies’ content: 57% said they read emails from brands while only 19% of U.S. moms do so.

Challenges

  • Brand loyalty towards one brand vs. another is very strong in some industries – e.g., the baby care industry. It may be based on brands used by previous generations or it built out of a product trial.
  • Hispanic women email lists need to be built in-house. Otherwise, be prepared to pay heftily for a solid list.
  • Trust generation is one of the most important achievements when targeting the Hispanic women market.

This audience IS the future. Play it smart and play it well. If you were doing business in China, you wouldn’t leave your marketing in the hands of people who knew nothing about the language and the culture, right? And there’s even more variations of Spanish than versions of Chinese. Don’t blame the market for not responding to your campaigns. The numbers are there and they are yours for the taking.

Words to live by

Words to live by

Next Quote? funny inspirational quotes on every post!

Hispanic mobile consumers study

As Hollywood looks to drive waning movie ticket sales, their focus should be on the growing Hispanic population and their use of mobile devices throughout the movie-planning process. This insight comes from research within The Mobile Consumer: Hispanics, Movies & Mobile, a new report by multicultural marketing agency Briabe Mobile and MocoSpace, the largest entertainment destination on the mobile Internet.

Hispanics attend movies more frequently than other racial demographics, and they're using their mobile devices to find theaters, movie times and reviews.

Hispanics attend movies more frequently than other racial demographics, and they’re using their mobile devices to find theaters, movie times and reviews.

Based on the results from a June 2011 survey of MocoSpace users, the study revealed Hispanics attend movies more frequently than other racial demographics, and they’re using their mobile devices to find theaters, movie times and reviews.

Hispanics are known to be a driving force for tickets sales. A recent Nielsen study found Hispanics make up approximately 15 percent of the U.S. population, but they represent 28 percent of today’s frequent moviegoers. This study echoed those findings, but also had key findings about Hispanics’ movie-attending habits.

Key findings for Hispanic mobile consumers include the following:

  • 75 percent of Hispanics go to the movie theater once a month, 25 percent see movies three times a month. This is more often than all other polled ethnic demographics.
  • Hispanic Americans use their phones for almost every part of the film-discovery process. 72 percent use their mobile devices for overall movie planning. Of those:
    • 65 percent use their mobile devices to find showtimes and locations
    • 39 percent use it to view trailers
    • 35 percent use it to discover movies
    • 28 percent use it to get reviews
    • 14 percent use it to buy tickets
  • 55 percent use their phones to access movie information within the four hours just prior to seeing a movie.

Not only are Hispanics using their phones to seek out movie information, the report found they’re influenced by mobile advertisements, too. One out of four interviewed said they look to search and mobile banner ads when deciding what film to see. After viewing a film, 55 percent of Hispanics said they discuss their opinion of the movie on social networks.

72 percent of Hispanics use their mobile devices for overall movie planning | Hispanic mobile Consumers Study

Hispanic mobile Consumers Study | 72 percent of Hispanics use their mobile devices for overall movie planning

Photo credit: VentureBeat

you are entitled to your informed opinion

you are entitled to your informed opinion

Unauthorized Immigrant Population: National and State Trends

by Jeffrey S. Passel, Senior Demographer, Pew Hispanic Center, and
D’Vera Cohn, Senior Writer, Pew Research Center

Although the number of unauthorized immigrants in the U.S. is below 2007 levels, it has tripled since 1990, when it was 3.5 million and grown by a third since 2000, when it was 8.4 million. | Estimates of the Unauthorized Immigrant Population 2010 - Pew Hispanic

Estimates of the Unauthorized Immigrant Population 2010 – Pew Hispanic

As of March 2010, 11.2 million unauthorized immigrants were living in the United States, virtually unchanged from a year earlier, according to new estimates from the Pew Hispanic Center, a project of the Pew Research Center. This stability in 2010 follows a two-year decline from the peak of 12 million in 2007 to 11.1 million in 2009 that was the first significant reversal in a two-decade pattern of growth. Unauthorized immigrants were 3.7% of the nation’s population in 2010.

The number of unauthorized immigrants in the nation’s workforce, 8 million in March 2010, also did not differ from the Pew Hispanic Center estimate for 2009. As with the population total, the number of unauthorized immigrants in the labor force had decreased in 2009 from its peak of 8.4 million in 2007. They made up 5.2% of the labor force in 2010.

The number of children born to at least one unauthorized-immigrant parent in 2009 was 350,000 and they made up 8% of all U.S. births, essentially the same as a year earlier. An analysis of the year of entry of unauthorized immigrants who became parents in 2009 indicates that 61% arrived in the U.S. before 2004, 30% arrived from 2004 to 2007, and 9% arrived from 2008 to 2010.

Other key points from the new report include:

The decline in the population of unauthorized immigrants from its peak in 2007 appears due mainly to a decrease in the number from Mexico, which went down to 6.5 million in 2010 from 7 million in 2007. Mexicans remain the largest group of unauthorized immigrants, accounting for 58% of the total.

  • The number of unauthorized immigrants decreased from 2007 to 2010 in Colorado, Florida, New York and Virginia. The combined population in three contiguous Mountain West states-Arizona, Nevada and Utah-also declined.
  • In contrast to the national trend, the combined unauthorized immigrant population in three contiguous West South Central states-Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas-grew from 2007 to 2010.
  • Although the number of unauthorized immigrants in the U.S. is below 2007 levels, it has tripled since 1990, when it was 3.5 million and grown by a third since 2000, when it was 8.4 million.

The estimates are based on data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s Current Population Survey, augmented with the Pew Hispanic Center’s analysis of the demographic characteristics of the unauthorized immigrant population using a “residual estimation methodology.”

Although the estimates indicate trends in the size and composition of the unauthorized-immigrant population, they are not designed to answer the question of why these changes occurred. There are many possible factors. The deep recession that began in the U.S. economy officially ended in 2009, but recovery has been slow to take hold and unemployment remains high. Immigration flows have tended to decrease in previous periods of economic distress.

The period covered by this analysis also has been accompanied by changes in the level of immigration enforcement and in enforcement strategies, not only by the federal government but also at state and local levels. Immigration also is subject to pressure by demographic and economic conditions in sending countries. This analysis does not attempt to quantify the relative impact of these forces on levels of unauthorized immigration.

Other Resources

Kochhar, Rakesh, C. Soledad Espinoza and Rebecca Hinze-Pifer. “After the Great Recession: Foreign Born Gain Jobs; Native Born Lose Jobs,” Pew Hispanic Center, Washington, D.C. (October 29, 2010).

Passel, Jeffrey S. and D’Vera Cohn. “U.S. Unauthorized Immigration Flows Are Down Sharply Since Mid-Decade,” Pew Hispanic Center, Washington, D.C. (September 1, 2010).

Passel, Jeffrey S. and Paul Taylor. “Unauthorized Immigrants and Their U.S.-Born Children,” Pew Hispanic Center, Washington, D.C. (August 11, 2010).

Einstein quotes

Einstein quotes

Why Marketers Should Care About Reaching Latina Bloggers

Speaking about Latina Bloggers is Elianne Ramos is the principal and CEO of Speak Hispanic Communications and vice-chair of Communications and PR for LATISM.

Elianne Ramos is the principal and CEO of Speak Hispanic Communications and vice-chair of Communications and PR for LATISM.

The first gift of the season goes to my dear friend, Elianne Ramos.:)  Elianne is an incredibly talented, knowledgeable, and hard working human being, she is the Principal & CEO of Speak Hispanic communications and vice-chair of Communications and PR for Latinos in Social Media (LATISM.) She is constantly on the go, generating great ideas and positively impacting the U.S. community. As if this wasn’t enough, she was the vice president, creative director and founder of i3 Creative Group, managing production teams working concurrently in the United States, Mexico, Uruguay and Argentina. In over 15 years of  creative direction, copy writing, public speaking, public relations and TV commercial production experience, Elianne has developed broadcast, multimedia and social media campaigns for high-profile clients. Her writing has appeared in numerous books and publications including the Chicken Soup for the Soul series and now, for the first time-ever, on the Hispanic Marketing blog.

Please, enjoy Elianne’s article. Elianne, this one is with all of the Target Latino love.

Why Marketers Should Care About Reaching Latina Bloggers

Even with the well-documented explosion of the Hispanic market, Internet sources like Technorati, which by 2008 was indexing 112.8 million blogs, have never touched upon the topic of Latinas and blogging. With the release of the Latinos in Social Media’s Latina Blogger Survey, though, it is now official: Latina bloggers are increasing their numbers and spreading throughout the blogosphere.

The intrinsic characteristics of blogging, where the private becomes public and communities rally together around common interests, make it the perfect platform for Latinas to voice life from their viewpoint … in in two languages, no less!

Beyond the obviously good news that these bloggers now provide us with a new outlet for furthering our brands’ messages—what with ever-shrinking minority-outreach budgets—the implications of this Latina blogger explosion for PR and marketing professionals are many:

The Good

• In Latino culture, where word-of-mouth and group interaction are second-nature, the trustworthiness of a blog post wrapped in a culturally relevant package can certainly influence the value of a brand in the eyes of their thousands of followers.

• These bloggers provide us with micro-niche audiences and more targeted outlets for furthering our brands’ messages. Stories published and promoted online have the potential to reach a greater number of people in very little time. In this context, a Latina blogger outreach program puts us in an ideal position to secure widespread coverage for our clients.

• Most Latinas blog in English, followed closely by Spanish and peppered with Spanglish, which means that their potential reach is amplified. Their choice of language in this case may be more about connecting with their readership, not necessarily a reflection of the language they speak more fluently. The key is listening and doing your homework in order to find the perfect fit.

• Latina bloggers are actively engaged in social media, and they tend to belong to tight, supportive communities online. Besides the fact that your message will reach well beyond the scope of the blog, this also means that other influencers in their communities will help disseminate it.

• Their culture infuses their writing but does not rule it.  Contrary to expectations, Latinas blog about numerous subjects, which opens up possibilities for different types of brand engagement.

• These Latinas are at the epicenter of merging worlds: between traditional and modern roles, between English and Spanish, between American and Latino cultures. They will bring a fresh perspective to your message, one that most closely reflects the Latina experience in the US.

The Bad

• Brand credibility: With consumers now doing research online and even generating their own content, consumers are less likely to believe a product review that blatantly comes from a sponsorship.

• Relative lack of control over the message: Know that consumers will be getting and act on impressions about your brand from less than perfect sources. Bloggers are not necessarily a self-regulating bunch, at least not yet. The fact that they can and will write whatever they want in their blog might create public relations issues. Just be sure to monitor their blogs, so you can address any issues or comments and give your official brand perspective, if need be.

• Saturation: With the fast growth rate of this segment, the Latina blogger market is likely to become saturated fast, which means their individual reach will, at some point and with few exceptions, start to diminish. This being a relatively young blogging community also means that the time to reach out to them is now.

The Ugly

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is cracking down on so-called “Blogola” by regulating blogger/advertiser relationships. The rules were updated December 2009.

The new rules include the fact that now bloggers must disclose material connections with a brand: whether they are receiving payment or free products and the kind of relationship they have with the company. What’s more, now both the brand and the blogger are subject to liability for misleading or unsubstantiated representations made. This means that the potential of a company being held responsible for approving unfounded claims—not rare in this realm—is a very real one. While the FTC regulations are beginning to be applied, the blogger outreach game is still an evolving one. The main things to keep in mind seem to be transparency, clear objectives and open ears: a willingness to listen and adjust, if need be.

Though a blogging campaign may be a godsend of great, relatively inexpensive publicity, remember that it is also —or should be—part of a larger communications/PR plan. Make sure all other elements of the campaign support your Latina blogging outreach and vice versa. If you do it right, Latina blogueras will rally behind your efforts with the same pasión they pour into their Web writing every day.

What has been your experience in reaching out to Latina bloggers? Please share in the comments below.

inspirational quote

inspirational quote

Do you know about people from Ecuador?

A total of 591,000 Hispanics of Ecuadorian origin resided in the United States in 2008, according to the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.

People from Ecuador in this statistical profile are people who self-identified as Hispanics of Ecuadorian origin; this means either they themselves are Ecuadorian immigrants or they trace their family ancestry to Ecuador. Ecuadorians are the ninth-largest population of Hispanic origin living in the United States, accounting for 1.3% of the U.S. Hispanic population in 2008.

A total of 591,000 Hispanics of Ecuadorian origin resided in the United States in 2008, according to the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.

A total of 591,000 Hispanics of Ecuadorian origin resided in the United States in 2008, according to the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.

Mexicans constituted 30.7 million, or 65.7%, of the Hispanic population.1

This statistical profile compares the demographic, income and economic characteristics of the Ecuadorian population with the characteristics of all Hispanics and the U.S. population overall. It is based on Pew Hispanic Center tabulations of the 2008 American Community Survey. Key facts include:

Immigration status. Two-thirds of Ecuadorians (66.4%) in the United States are foreign born compared with 38.1% of Hispanics and 12.5% of the U.S. population overall. Two-thirds of immigrants from Ecuador (66.2%) arrived in the U.S. in 1990 or later. Nearly four-in-ten Ecuadorian immigrants (37.2%) are U.S. citizens.

Language. Less than half of Ecuadorians (49.1%) speak English proficiently.2 Some 50.9% of Ecuadorians ages 5 and older report speaking English less than very well, compared with 37.3% of all Hispanics.

Age. Ecuadorians are younger than the U.S. population and older than Hispanics overall. The median age of Ecuadorians is 32; the median ages of the U.S. population and all Hispanics are 36 and 27, respectively.

Marital status. Ecuadorians are more likely than Hispanics overall to be married—50.7% versus 46.5%.

Fertility. Two-in-ten (20.8%) of Ecuadorian women ages 15 to 44 who gave birth in the 12 months prior to the survey were unmarried. That was less than the rate for all Hispanic women—38.8%—and the rate for U.S. women—34.5%.

Regional dispersion. Two-thirds of Ecuadorians (68.0%) live in the Northeast, and more than four-in-ten (42.5%) live in New York.

Educational attainment. Ecuadorians have higher levels of education than the Hispanic population overall. Some 18.2% of Ecuadorians ages 25 and older—compared with 12.9% of all U.S. Hispanics—have obtained at least a bachelor’s degree.

Income. The median annual personal earnings for Ecuadorians ages 16 and older were $23,423 in 2008; the median earnings for all U.S. Hispanics were $21,488.

Poverty status. The share of Ecuadorians who live in poverty, 13.5%, is similar to the rate for the general U.S. population (12.7%) and below the 20.7% share among all Hispanics.

Health Insurance. One-third of Ecuadorians (34.7%) do not have health insurance compared with 31.7% of all Hispanics and 15.4% of the general U.S. population. Additionally, 16.4% of Ecuadorians younger than 18 are uninsured.

Homeownership. The rate of Ecuadorian homeownership (40.3%) is lower than the rate for all Hispanics (49.1%) and the U.S. population (66.6%) as a whole.

Percentages are computed before numbers are rounded.Ecuadorians ages 5 and older who report speaking only English at home or speaking English very well.Source: Pew Research Center

Who are the Peruvians?

A total of 519,000 Hispanics of Peruvian origin resided in the United States in 2008, according to the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.

A total of 519,000 Hispanics of Peruvian origin resided in the United States in 2008, according to the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.

A total of 519,000 Hispanics of Peruvian origin resided in the United States in 2008, according to the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.

Peruvians in this statistical profile are people who self-identified as Hispanics of Peruvian origin; this means either they themselves are Peruvian immigrants or they trace their family ancestry to Peru. Peruvians are the tenth-largest population of Hispanic origin living in the United States, accounting for 1.1% of the U.S. Hispanic population in 2008. Mexicans constituted 30.7 million, or 65.7%, of the Hispanic population.1

This statistical profile compares the demographic, income and economic characteristics of the Peruvian population with the characteristics of all Hispanics and the U.S. population overall. It is based on Pew Hispanic Center tabulations of the 2008 American Community Survey. Key facts include:

Immigration status. Seven-in-ten Peruvians (69.3%) in the United States are foreign born compared with 38.1% of Hispanics and 12.5% of the U.S. population overall. Two-thirds of immigrants from Peru (66.1%) arrived in the U.S. in 1990 or later. Four-in-ten Peruvian immigrants (42.3%) are U.S. citizens.

Language. A majority of Peruvians (55.1%) speak English proficiently.2 Some 44.9% of Peruvians ages 5 and older report speaking English less than very well, compared with 37.3% of all Hispanics.

Age. Peruvians are similar in age to the U.S. population and older than Hispanics overall. The median age of Peruvians is 35; the median ages of the U.S. population and all Hispanics are 36 and 27, respectively.

Marital status. Peruvians are more likely than Hispanics overall to be married—50.7% versus 46.5%.

Fertility. Two-in-ten Peruvian women (19.6%) ages 15 to 44 who gave birth in the 12 months prior to the survey were unmarried. That was less than the rate for all Hispanic women—38.8%—and the rate for U.S. women—34.5%.

Regional dispersion. Peruvians are more geographically dispersed than other Hispanic origin groups. Two-in-ten Peruvians (19.8%) live in Florida and one-in-six (16.8%) live in California; some one-in-eight live in New Jersey (12.9%) and New York (12.3%).

Educational attainment. Peruvians have higher levels of education than the Hispanic population overall. Some 29.8% of Peruvians ages 25 and older—compared with 12.9% of all U.S. Hispanics—have obtained at least a bachelor’s degree.

Income. The median annual personal earnings for Peruvians ages 16 and older were $24,441 in 2008; the median earnings for all U.S. Hispanics were $21,488.

Poverty status. The share of Peruvians who live in poverty, 9.5%, is lower than the rate of the general U.S. population (12.7%) and the rate among all Hispanics (20.7%).

Health Insurance. Three-in-ten Peruvians (30.2%) do not have health insurance compared with 31.7% of all Hispanics and 15.4% of the general U.S. population. Additionally, 20.0% of Peruvians younger than 18 are uninsured.

Homeownership. The rate of Peruvian homeownership (50.1%) is similar to the rate for all Hispanics (49.1%) but lower than the 66.6% rate for the U.S. population as a whole.

Percentages are computed before numbers are rounded.Peruvians ages 5 and older who report speaking only English at home or speaking English very well.Source: Pew Research Center

What do you know of Hondurans?

A total of 608,000 Hispanics of Honduran origin resided in the United States in 2008, according to the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.

A total of 608,000 Hispanics of Honduran origin resided in the United States in 2008, according to the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.

A total of 608,000 Hispanics of Honduran origin resided in the United States in 2008, according to the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.

Hondurans in this statistical profile are people who self-identified as Hispanics of Honduran origin; this means either they themselves are Honduran immigrants or they trace their family ancestry to Honduras. Hondurans are the eighth-largest population of Hispanic origin living in the United States, accounting for 1.3% of the U.S. Hispanic population in 2008. Mexicans constituted 30.7 million, or 65.7%, of the Hispanic population.1

This statistical profile compares the demographic, income and economic characteristics of the Honduran population with the characteristics of all Hispanics and the U.S. population overall. It is based on Pew Hispanic Center tabulations of the 2008 American Community Survey. Key facts include:

Immigration status. Seven-in-ten Hondurans (68.6%) in the United States are foreign born compared with 38.1% of Hispanics and 12.5% of the U.S. population overall. Three-in-four immigrants from Honduras (74.0%) arrived in the U.S. in 1990 or later. Two-in-ten Honduran immigrants (21.9%) are U.S. citizens.

Language. Four-in-ten Hondurans (39.7%) speak English proficiently.2 Some 60.3% of Hondurans ages 5 and older report speaking English less than very well, compared with 37.3% of all Hispanics.

Age. Hondurans are younger than the U.S. population and similar in age to Hispanics overall. The median age of Hondurans is 28; the median ages of the U.S. population and all Hispanics are 36 and 27, respectively.

Marital status. Hondurans are less likely than Hispanics overall to be married—40.6% versus 46.5%.

Fertility. Four-in-ten (42.5%) of Honduran women ages 15 to 44 who gave birth in the 12 months prior to the survey were unmarried. That was greater than the rate for all Hispanic women—38.8%—and the rate for U.S. women—34.5%.

Regional dispersion. A majority of Hondurans (54.9%) live in the South, mostly in Florida and Texas. Some one-in-eight Hondurans (12.9%) live in California and in New York (12.5%).

Educational attainment. Hondurans have lower levels of education than the Hispanic population overall. Some 50.0% of Hondurans ages 25 and older—compared with 39.2% of all U.S. Hispanics—have not obtained at least a high school diploma.

Income. The median annual personal earnings for Hondurans ages 16 and older were $19,349 in 2008; the median earnings for all U.S. Hispanics were $21,488.

Poverty status. The share of Hondurans who live in poverty, 21.5%, is higher than the rate for the general U.S. population (12.7%) and similar to the rate for Hispanics overall (20.7%).

Health Insurance. One-half of Hondurans (49.3%) do not have health insurance compared with 31.7% of all Hispanics and 15.4% of the general U.S. population. Additionally, 26.4% of Hondurans younger than 18 are uninsured.

Homeownership. The rate of Honduran homeownership (33.9%) is lower than the rate for all Hispanics (49.1%) and the U.S. population (66.6%) as a whole.

Percentages are computed before numbers are rounded.Hondurans ages 5 and older who report speaking only English at home or speaking English very well.Source: Pew Research Center

Meet the Colombians!!!

A total of 882,000 Hispanics of Colombian origin resided in the United States in 2008, according to the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.

A total of 882,000 Hispanics of Colombian origin resided in the United States in 2008, according to the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.

A total of 882,000 Hispanics of Colombian origin resided in the United States in 2008, according to the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.

Colombians in this statistical profile are people who self-identified as Hispanics of Colombian origin; this means either they themselves are Colombian immigrants or they trace their family ancestry to Colombia. Colombians are the seventh-largest population of Hispanic origin living in the United States, accounting for 1.9% of the U.S. Hispanic population in 2008. Mexicans constituted 30.7 million, or 65.7%, of the Hispanic population.1

This statistical profile compares the demographic, income and economic characteristics of the Colombian population with the characteristics of all Hispanics and the U.S. population overall. It is based on Pew Hispanic Center tabulations of the 2008 American Community Survey. Key facts include:

Immigration status. Two-thirds of Colombians (66.5%) in the United States are foreign born compared with 38.1% of Hispanics and 12.5% of the U.S. population overall. Most immigrants from Colombia (58.7%) arrived in the U.S. in 1990 or later. Less than half of Colombian immigrants (48.8%) are U.S. citizens.

Language. A majority of Colombians (57.5%) speak English proficiently.2 Some 42.5% of Colombians ages 5 and older report speaking English less than very well, compared with 37.3% of all Hispanics

Age. Colombians are older than Hispanics overall. The median age of  Colombians is 36, which is the same as the median ages of the U.S. population; the median age of all Hispanics is 27.

Marital status. Colombians are more likely than Hispanics overall to be married—50.4% versus 46.5%.

Fertility. One-in-five (21.6%) Colombian women ages 15 to 44 who gave birth in the 12 months prior to the survey were unmarried. That was less than the rate for all Hispanic women—38.8%—and the rate for U.S. women—34.5%.

Regional dispersion. Colombians are concentrated in the South (46.8%), mostly in Florida (31.9%), and in the Northeast (37.3%), mostly in New York (16.1%) and New Jersey (12.9%).

Educational attainment. Colombians have higher levels of education than the Hispanic population overall. Some 30.3% of Colombians ages 25 and older—compared with 12.9% of all U.S. Hispanics—have obtained at least a bachelor’s degree.

Income. The median annual personal earnings for Colombians ages 16 and older were $25,460 in 2008; the median earnings for all U.S. Hispanics were $21,488.

Poverty status. The share of Colombians who live in poverty, 11.0%, is similar to the rate for the general U.S. population (12.7%) and lower than the rate for Hispanics overall (20.7%).

Health Insurance. One-quarter of Colombians (26.4%) do not have health insurance compared with 31.7% of all Hispanics and 15.4% of the general U.S. population. Additionally, 16.6% of Colombians younger than 18 are uninsured.

Homeownership. The rate of Colombian homeownership (53.0%) is higher than the rate for all Hispanics (49.1%) but lower than the 66.6% rate for the U.S. population as a whole.

Percentages are computed before numbers are rounded.Colombians ages 5 and older who report speaking only English at home or speaking English very well.Source: Pew Hispanic

Do you know Guatemalans?

Flag of Guatemala

Flag of Guatemala

A total of 986,000 Hispanics of Guatemalan origin resided in the United States in 2008, according to the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey. Guatemalans in this statistical profile are people who self-identified as Hispanics of Guatemalan origin; this means either they themselves are Guatemalan immigrants or they trace their family ancestry to Guatemala. Guatemalans are the sixth-largest population of Hispanic origin living in the United States, accounting for 2.1% of the U.S. Hispanic population in 2008. Mexicans constituted 30.7 million, or 65.7%, of the Hispanic population.1 This statistical profile compares the demographic, income and economic characteristics of the Guatemalan population with the characteristics of all Hispanics and the U.S. population overall. It is based on Pew Hispanic Center tabulations of the 2008 American Community Survey. Key facts include: Immigration status. Seven-in-ten Guatemalans (69.4%) in the United States are foreign born compared with 38.1% of Hispanics and 12.5% of the U.S. population overall. Seven-in-ten of immigrants from Guatemala (69.6%) arrived in the U.S. in 1990 or later. Nearly one quarter of Guatemalan immigrants (23.8%) are U.S. citizens. Language. Four-in-ten Guatemalans (39.1%) speak English proficiently.2 Some 60.9% of Guatemalans ages 5 and older report speaking English less than very well, compared with 37.3% of all Hispanics. Age. Guatemalans are younger than the U.S. population and similar in age to Hispanics overall. The median age of Guatemalans is28; the median ages of the U.S. population and all Hispanics are 36 and 27, respectively. Marital status. Less than half of Guatemalans (44.6%) and Hispanics overall (46.5%) are married. Fertility. Four-in-ten (41.3%) Guatemalan women ages 15 to 44 who gave birth in the 12 months prior to the survey were unmarried. That was greater than the rate for all Hispanic women—38.8%—and the rate for U.S. women—34.5%. Regional dispersion. Four-in-ten Guatemalans (40.2%) live in the West, mostly in California (33.9%). One-third (32.4%) live in the South. Educational attainment. Guatemalans have lower levels of education than the Hispanic population overall. Some 53.6% of Guatemalans ages 25 and older—compared with 39.2% of all U.S. Hispanics—have not obtained at least a high school diploma. Income. The median annual personal earnings for Guatemalans ages 16 and older were $19,349 in 2008; the median earnings for all U.S. Hispanics were $21,488. Poverty status. The share of Guatemalans who live in poverty, 20.6%, is higher than the rate for the general U.S. population (12.7%) and similar to the share for all Hispanics (20.7%). Health Insurance. Nearly one-half of Guatemalans (47.9%) do not have health insurance compared with 31.7% of all Hispanics and 15.4% of the general U.S. population. Additionally, 22.8% of Guatemalans younger than 18 are uninsured. Homeownership. The rate of Guatemalan homeownership (35.6%) is lower than the rate for all Hispanics (49.1%) and the U.S. population (66.6%) as a whole. 1 Percentages are computed before numbers are rounded. 2 Guatemalans ages 5 and older who report speaking only English at home or speaking English very well.

Source: Pew Hispanic Center

A little about Dominicans

Dominican Republic: flag

Dominican Republic: flag

A total of 1.3 million Hispanics of Dominican origin resided in the United States in 2008, according to the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.

Dominicans in this statistical profile are people who self-identified as Hispanics of Dominican origin; this means either they themselves are Dominican immigrants or they trace their family ancestry to the Dominican Republic.

Dominicans are the fifth-largest population of Hispanic origin living in the United States, accounting for 2.8% of the U.S. Hispanic population in 2008. Mexicans constituted 30.7 million, or 65.7%, of the Hispanic population.1

This statistical profile compares the demographic, income and economic characteristics of the Dominican population with the characteristics of all Hispanics and the U.S. population overall. It is based on Pew Hispanic Center tabulations of the 2008 American Community Survey. Key facts include:

Immigration status. Nearly six-in-ten of Dominicans (57.3%) in the United States are foreign born, compared with 38.1% of Hispanics and 12.5% of the U.S. population overall. Most immigrants from the Dominican Republic (57.0%) arrived in the U.S. in 1990 or later. Nearly half of Dominican immigrants (47.4%) are U.S. citizens.

Language. A majority of Dominicans (53.4%) speak English proficiently.2 Some 46.6% of Dominicans ages 5 and older report speaking English less than very well, compared with 37.3% of all Hispanics.

Age. Dominicans are younger than the U.S. population and older than Hispanics overall. The median age of Dominicans is 29; the median ages of the U.S. population and all Hispanics are 36 and 27, respectively.

Marital status. Dominicans are less likely than Hispanics overall to be married—38.7% versus 46.5%.

Fertility. Half (52.0%) of Dominican women ages 15 to 44 who gave birth in the 12 months prior to the survey were unmarried. That was greater than the rate for all Hispanic women—38.8%—and the rate for U.S. women— 34.5%.

Regional dispersion. Eight-in-ten Dominicans (79.4%) live in the Northeast, and half (50.6%) live in New York.

Educational attainment. Dominicans have slightly higher levels of education than the Hispanic population overall. Sixteen percent of Dominicans ages 25 and older—compared with 12.9% of all U.S. Hispanics—have obtained at least a bachelor’s degree.

Income. The median annual personal earnings for Dominicans ages 16 and older were $20,571 in 2008; the median earnings for all U.S. Hispanics were $21,488.

Poverty status. The share of Dominicans who live in poverty, 23.2%, is nearly double the rate for the general U.S. population (12.7%) and higher than the 20.7% share among all Hispanics.

Health Insurance. One-quarter of Dominicans (23.4%) do not have health insurance compared with 31.7% of all Hispanics and 15.4% of the general U.S. population. Additionally, 12.5% of Dominicans younger than 18 are uninsured.

Homeownership. The rate of Dominican homeownership (28.3%) is lower than the rate for all Hispanics (49.1%) and the U.S. population (66.6%) as a whole.

Percentages are computed before numbers are rounded.Dominicans ages 5 and older who report speaking only English at home or speaking English very well.

Source: Pew Hispanic Center