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Ratoncito Perez seeks to educate Hispanic kids on oral health

With toothbrush in hand, Ratoncito Perez seeks to educate Hispanic kids on oral health as part of Hispanic Heritage Month

In celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month, Delta Dental Insurance Company has joined forces with the tooth fairy’s Spanish-speaking counterpart, el Ratoncito Perez, to remind Hispanic children and their parents about the importance of good dental hygiene.

Ratoncito Perez seeks to educate Hispanic children on oral health

Ratoncito Perez seeks to educate Hispanic children on oral health

According to the American Association of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD), tooth decay is the most common childhood disease, affecting nearly 60 percent of children. Of the 4 million children born each year, nearly half are estimated to get their first cavity by the time they reach second grade. What’s more, according to the May 2000 Surgeon General’s report, Oral Health in America, more than 51 million school hours are lost each year due to tooth decay and other dental problems. For minorities and children from low-income families, these statistics are increasingly worse.

“Oral health problems persist among children, in spite of the fact that tooth decay is largely preventable,” said Solomon Romano, Hispanic marketing manager for Delta Dental. “We have teamed up with Ratoncito Perez and put in place several initiatives – a Spanish-language website, bilingual brochures and Spanish-speaking dentists – to educate parents and children that through regular dental cleanings and checkups, the use of sealants, and appropriate diet and oral health care, a healthy smile is achievable and maintained.”

As part of this dental health awareness effort, Delta Dental and Ratoncito Perez share the following simple tips that parents and children can practice to prevent dental problems:

  • Visit your dentist every six months for dental cleanings and check-ups.
  • Floss your teeth at least once a day. The floss should go between the gum and each tooth to clean food particles trapped under there.
  • Brush your teeth after every meal and before going to bed. Each brushing session should last at least two minutes and should include fluoride-based toothpaste.
  • After snacking, drink a glass of water to help wash away the sugar and neutralize the acid. Alternatively, chewing sugar-free gum to stimulate saliva flow has the same effect.
  • Limit consumption of sugary drinks such as juice and soda. When you or your children do drink them, use a straw, which limits the sugary beverage’s contact with teeth.

For more information on children’s preventive dental care, please visit Delta Dental’s website: http://www.mysmilekids.com/espanol/index.html

So many times I wished I'd listened to my gut

So many times I wished I’d listened to my gut

Source: Delta Dental

Kids of Spanish-speaking Hispanic moms watch less TV

When it comes to a kid’s television-viewing habits, the mom’s language can matter.

When it comes to a kid's television-viewing habits, the mom's language can matter.

When it comes to a kid’s television-viewing habits, the mom’s language can matter.

Researchers at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine surveyed 1,347 women who had children ages 35 months to 4 years to assess just how much time the kids spent in front on the tube. They knew that young children of white mothers and young children of Hispanic mothers watched similar amounts of TV (we’ll go out on a limb here and say “too much”), but they seemed to think there might be some variables to be explored within those numbers and perhaps, down the road, interventions to be found.

They were right on the former. The latter remains to be seen. The researchers found that kids of English-speaking Hispanic moms and kids of Spanish-speaking Hispanic moms watched about the same amount of TV during their first year (yes, yes, infants watching any TV…). But by the second and third years, children of the English-speaking moms watched more, a lot more.

The abstract was published online Monday in the February issue of Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Maybe TV simply is less important to Spanish-speaking Hispanic moms, the researchers speculated, or maybe there are fewer Spanish-language shows for toddlers.

Regardless, they conclude: “These findings highlight the need to further understand sociocultural factors that influence television viewing habits in young Hispanic children. Interventionists should consider such factors when designing interventions targeting television viewing in young Hispanic children. Additionally, these findings emphasize the need for researchers to appreciate the heterogeneity of the Hispanic population when describing health behaviors and outcomes in this population.”

And if you’re wondering why this is relevant, the researchers point out in the study’s introduction: “Excessive television viewing in early childhood is associated with a multitude of negative health outcomes, including obesity, attention problems, and sleep troubles. … Additionally, Hispanic children face disparities in many health outcomes,18 some of which may be associated with early television habits.”

Source: Tami Dennis, Los Angeles Times – Orlando Sentinel

A Latino company with a heart – a mother’s heart

Precious Baby Doll Company is a company with a mission to create a loving home for wonderful baby dolls through “adoption.” The Precious Doll Company was a dream of a woman who experienced first-hand the pain of relinquishing a baby for adoption and the joy of becoming a mother to an adopted daughter. It was her vision to establish a company that would realize the story behind every adoption and breathe life into each by creating stories that celebrated the joy of finally bringing the baby home.
It was summer, and a young Mary Beth Wells, gave birth to a beautiful daughter, whom she silently and privately named Kimberly Caryn. It was her struggle to relinquish this baby to parents who could provide a home with love and stability. It remains the most painful decision of her life, to love this child enough to place her with a family who would raise her to be their own.
Years later, Mary Beth found her birth daughter and began to have a relationship with her. Part one of the healing had occurred. Her prayers were answered when she became the mother to Sophia whom she adopted from Guatemala. Sophia became the love of her life. At last, she had two daughters- the circle of adoption to adoption was complete.
It was time to realize another dream- to give birth again, this time to a company that could bring precious dolls into loving homes. She knew, in her heart, that the Precious Baby Doll Company could help tell the stories of babies adopted all over the world, babies that now lived in America with their new families.
The dolls and their stories help any child learn the gift of adoption. Each doll comes with a book that tells the story about their country of birth and the love that brought them to a new world. The books that accompany these dolls tell the story of the journey that brought them home- these are stories of love with arms outstretched in two directions, one giving and one receiving. The stories tell how the children were wanted for such a long time and the supreme happiness in finally bringing these babies home to forever live with their new family.
The Precious Baby Doll Company is dedicated to providing the highest quality standards in clothing, design and story. The dolls are made to be permanent members of the family, with quality and beauty that is durable and precious like its name.
Every adoptive child has two histories and a bright future. It’s the history of the native land, the history of the family to which it is now a member and the future that has yet to unfold. The Precious Baby Doll Company celebrates and respects all three through stories, clothing and accessory lines. The books tell the stories of the beginning of their lives, leaving room for the parents to fill in all the details that made their child so uniquely wonderful. The books affirm the pride in having a home in “two lands”, with a foundation of knowledge about the country of origin as well as a deep love of America.

Precious Baby Doll Company is a company with a mission to create a loving home for wonderful baby dolls through “adoption.” The Precious Doll Company was a dream of a woman who experienced first-hand the pain of relinquishing a baby for adoption and the joy of becoming a mother to an adopted daughter. It was her vision to establish a company that would realize the story behind every adoption and breathe life into each by creating stories that celebrated the joy of finally bringing the baby home.

It was summer, and a young Mary Beth Wells, gave birth to a beautiful daughter, whom she silently and privately named Kimberly Caryn. It was her struggle to relinquish this baby to parents who could provide a home with love and stability. It remains the most painful decision of her life, to love this child enough to place her with a family who would raise her to be their own.

Years later, Mary Beth found her birth daughter and began to have a relationship with her. Part one of the healing had occurred. Her prayers were answered when she became the mother to Sophia whom she adopted from Guatemala. Sophia became the love of her life. At last, she had two daughters- the circle of adoption to adoption was complete.

It was time to realize another dream- to give birth again, this time to a company that could bring precious dolls into loving homes. She knew, in her heart, that the Precious Baby Doll Company could help tell the stories of babies adopted all over the world, babies that now lived in America with their new families.

The dolls and their stories help any child learn the gift of adoption. Each doll comes with a book that tells the story about their country of birth and the love that brought them to a new world. The books that accompany these dolls tell the story of the journey that brought them home- these are stories of love with arms outstretched in two directions, one giving and one receiving. The stories tell how the children were wanted for such a long time and the supreme happiness in finally bringing these babies home to forever live with their new family.

The Precious Baby Doll Company is dedicated to providing the highest quality standards in clothing, design and story. The dolls are made to be permanent members of the family, with quality and beauty that is durable and precious like its name.

Every adoptive child has two histories and a bright future. It’s the history of the native land, the history of the family to which it is now a member and the future that has yet to unfold. The Precious Baby Doll Company celebrates and respects all three through stories, clothing and accessory lines. The books tell the stories of the beginning of their lives, leaving room for the parents to fill in all the details that made their child so uniquely wonderful. The books affirm the pride in having a home in “two lands”, with a foundation of knowledge about the country of origin as well as a deep love of America.

Source: Precious Baby Doll

Hispanics Tune in and Help Raise More Than $633,000 for Kids With Cancer During 2nd Annual Promesa & Esperanza Radiothon Benefiting St. Jude

Hispanic radio listeners in more than a dozen cities tuned in to help fight against childhood cancer, raising more than $633,000 in cash and pledges during the 2nd annual ‘Promesa y Esperanza’ (Promise and Hope) radiothon to benefit St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital(R). The two-day radiothon took place October 8 – 9 in Philadelphia, Charlotte, New Orleans, Providence, Norfolk, Durham, Nashville, Minneapolis, Kansas City, Louisville, Richmond and Springfield, Mass. Thousands of callers pledged their support for kids with cancer and other catastrophic diseases at St. Jude, one of the world’s premier pediatric cancer research centers.

Hispanics Tune in and Help Raise More Than $633,000 for Kids With Cancer During 2nd Annual Promesa & Esperanza Radiothon Benefiting St. Jude

Hispanics Tune in and Help Raise More Than $633,000 for Kids With Cancer During 2nd Annual Promesa & Esperanza Radiothon Benefiting St. Jude

Stations owned by Golden Door and Davidson Media Group (DMG) and its partner radio stations dedicated more than 30 hours of programming to further the mission of St. Jude by encouraging their listeners to pledge just $20 a month as anAngel de Esperanza (Angel of Hope). These donations help St. Jude maintain its promise that no child is ever denied treatment because of a family’s inability to pay. Since opening in 1962, St. Jude has treated children from all 50 states and around the world.

The hospital’s International Outreach Program (IOP) freely shares medical advancements achieved in the treatment of childhood cancer in developed countries to those with limited resources. As of June 2009, the St. Jude IOP program has partner clinics in 15 countries in Latin America and around the world, including Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Costa Rica, Venezuela, Ecuador, Chile and Brazil.

“This year’s radiothon was truly a great success and we are so proud to partner with St. Jude to help ensure that these sick children will have a fighting chance to live healthy and happy lives,” said Felix L. Perez, President and CEO of Davidson Media Group. Davidson Media Group owns 37 Radio stations in 19 different markets throughout the U.S.

Listeners had the opportunity to hear stories of survival from Hispanic children who are currently undergoing treatment, such as 3 year-old St. Jude patient Victor who was diagnosed with leukemia. At St. Jude, Victor received medical treatment at no costs to his family thanks to the generous donations from the community.

“Everyone at St. Jude is grateful for the generosity shown by the Hispanic community for our patients and their families,” said Richard C. Shadyac Jr., CEO of ALSAC, the fundraising organization of St. Jude. “It is heartwarming to see such an enthusiastic response during the Promesa y Esperanza radiothon, and we are inspired by the radio partners and donors who have embraced our lifesaving mission of finding cures and saving children.”

About St. Jude:

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital is internationally recognized for its pioneering work in finding cures and saving children with cancer and other catastrophic diseases. St. Jude is the first and only pediatric cancer center to be designated as a Comprehensive Cancer Center by the National Cancer Institute. Founded by late entertainer Danny Thomas and based in Memphis, Tenn., St. Jude freely shares its discoveries with scientific and medical communities around the world. St. Jude is the only pediatric cancer research center where families never pay for treatment not covered by insurance. No child is ever denied treatment because of the family’s inability to pay. St. Jude is financially supported by ALSAC, its fundraising organization. For more information, please visit www.stjude.org.

Source: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

Main image: The Children’s Neuroblastoma Cancer Foundation

Hispanic Children and Obesity Risk

Hispanic Children In U.S. At Greater Risk For Obesity Than Other Ethnic/Racial Groups

The prevalence of overweight in the US population is among the highest in Mexican-American children and adolescents. In a study of 1,030 Hispanic children between the ages of 4 and 19, published in the June 2009 issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, researchers from the Baylor College of Medicine found less than optimal diets in both overweight and non-overweight participants.

Hispanic Children and Obesity Risk

Hispanic Children In U.S. At Greater Risk For Obesity Than Other Ethnic/Racial Groups

Hispanic Children In U.S. At Greater Risk For Obesity Than Other Ethnic/Racial Groups

According to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES), in 2005-2006 the prevalence of overweight among children (2-19 years) from all ethnic/racial groups was 15.5%. For Mexican-American males and females (2-19 years) the prevalence was 23.2% and 18.5%, respectively. Although the US environment encourages a sedentary lifestyle and excess food intake, the Hispanic population is burdened with additional risk factors for childhood obesity including parental obesity, low socioeconomic status (SES), recent immigration, acculturation to US diet and lifestyle, and limited health insurance coverage.

The VIVA LA FAMILIA Study was designed to identify genetic and environmental factors contributing to childhood obesity in the Hispanic population. It provided the novel opportunity to assess the diet of a large cohort of Hispanic children from low-SES families at high risk for obesity (1,030 children from 319 families in Houston, Texas). On average, 91% of parents were overweight or obese and parental income and education levels were low. Food insecurity was reported by 49% of households.

Writing in the article, Nancy F. Butte, PhD, Professor, USDA/ARS Children’s Nutrition Research Center, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, states, “The diets of these low-SES Hispanic children were adequate in most essential nutrients, but suboptimal for the promotion of long-term health. Diet quality did not satisfy US dietary guidelines for fat, cholesterol, saturated fatty acids, fiber, added sugar, and sodium. Although energy intake was higher in overweight children, food sources, diet quality, and macro- and micronutrient composition were similar between non-overweight and overweight siblings…Knowledge of the dietary intake of children from low-SES Hispanic families at high risk for obesity will provide a basis on which to build nutritional interventions and policy that are appropriately tailored to population sub-groups.”

In a commentary published in the same issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Rafael Pérez-Escamilla, PhD, Professor of Nutritional Sciences & Public Health, Director, NIH EXPORT Center for Eliminating, Health Disparities among Latinos (CEHDL), University of Connecticut, Storrs, asks whether the process of acculturation into “mainstream” US society is having negative effects on Hispanics. Citing numerous studies, he explores many of the factors that both support and contradict the assimilation argument, and concludes that while acculturation is likely a negative influence, further study is warranted. He writes, “However, we still need to elucidate the mechanisms and the extent to which acculturation to the USA ‘mainstream’ culture per se explain deterioration in dietary quality, and increased risks for obesity and associated chronic diseases among Latinos. Filling in this gap in knowledge is essential for developing culturally appropriate and behavioral change based interventions targeting Latinos with different levels of acculturation.”

The article is “Nutrient adequacy and diet quality in non-overweight and overweight Hispanic children of low socioeconomic status – the VIVA LA FAMILIA Study” by Theresa A. Wilson, MS, RD, Anne L. Adolph, BS, and Nancy F. Butte, PhD. The commentary is “Dietary quality among Latinos: Is acculturation making us sick?” by Rafael Pérez-Escamilla, PhD. Both appear in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Volume 109, Issue 6 (June 2009) published by Elsevier.

Source: APA – Elsevier (2009, June 4). Hispanic Children In U.S. At Greater Risk For Obesity Than Other Ethnic/Racial Groups. ScienceDaily. Retrieved

First Bilingual Educational Toy Brand, Ingenio(TM), Hits the U.S. Market

Alpharetta, Ga.-based Smart Play, LLC has launched Ingenio(TM), the first entirely bilingual educational toy brand and games in the United States. The product line features 10 portable, affordable toys and games that teach a comprehensive range of early learning skills in English and Spanish – fine motor, reading, writing, math, vocabulary, geography and problem solving.

First Bilingual Educational Toy Brand, Ingenio(TM), Hits the U.S. Market

First Bilingual Educational Toy Brand, Ingenio(TM), Hits the U.S. Market

Ingenio’s bilingual product line ranges from electronic learning toys and puzzles to educational games. All products emphasize English and Spanish equally to enable the child to learn a second language easily. The light-weight, travel-friendly products offer children dynamic, “unplugged” playtime, free from the chain-and-drain of a computer or television.

Unlocking a world of opportunities, Ingenio helps preschool and grade school children (ages 3-8 years) learn both languages in the context of fun. Smart Play’s products are bilingual by design(TM) to facilitate learning at an early age, which research indicates is the prime time for language acquisition.

The proven benefits of bilingualism include greater cognitive flexibility, improved powers of concept formation and enhanced creativity. Spanish is the second-most prominent language in the country, and nearly 25 percent of all U.S. children between the ages of 3 and 6 are of Hispanic origin (a number that is quickly on the rise). This makes Ingenio an ingenious tool to form future leaders.

“Finally, a foreign-language educational toy company!” said Liza Sanchez, founder of Escuela Bilingüe Internacional, in response to Ingenio. “As a parent, I am thrilled to finally be able to provide toys that represent our home language. As a teacher, I have been looking for years for products that can help my young students advance their Spanish education both in and outside of the classroom. The cognitive and social benefits of becoming bilingual have made many parents realize the importance of learning a second language.”

In addition to recognition from educational leaders, Ingenio has already garnered accolades from the toy industry. Ingenio recently received the 2009 Dr. Toy’s Best Vacation Product and Creative Child Magazine 2009 Top Toy of the Year.

Not only is Ingenio innovative and educational but also budget-friendly. Eight of the 10 products are less than $ 15 and all products are available at Amazon.com and will soon be available at Toys “R” Us.com.

About Smart Play

Smart Play provides safe, affordable, innovative and educational products to enrich your child’s mind. Play is the perfect way to reinforce and extend the skills children learn at home and at school. Many of our products are designed to grow with your child by offering age-appropriate activities with progressive levels of difficulty.

For more information about Ingenio products, please visit our bilingual site: www.smartplay.us.

Source: Smart Play, LLC

Hispanic Immigrants’ Children Fall Behind Peers Early, Study Finds

A great example of a study (or its interpretation) that misleads readers. This is a problem that stems from poverty and parents with a low educational level. This is definitely not related to the parent’s immigration status. Children from Hispanic immigrants whose parents have a very high level of education do even better than their American counterpart. Feel free to comment.

Claudia Goffan

Here is the article:

The children of Hispanic immigrants tend to be born healthy and start life on an intellectual par with other American children, but by the age of 2 they begin to lag in linguistic and cognitive skills, a new study by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, shows.

Hispanic Immigrants’ Children Fall Behind Peers Early, Study Finds

Hispanic Immigrants’ Children Fall Behind Peers Early, Study Finds

The study highlights a paradox that has bedeviled educators and Hispanic families for some time. By and large, mothers from Latin American countries take care of their health during their pregnancies and give birth to robust children, but those children fall behind their peers in mental development by the time they reach grade school, and the gap tends to widen as they get older.

The new Berkeley study suggests the shortfall may start even before the children enter preschool, supporting calls in Washington to spend more on programs that coach parents to stimulate their children with books, drills and games earlier in their lives.

“Our results show a very significant gap even at age 3,” said Bruce Fuller, one of the study’s authors and a professor of education at Berkeley. “If we don’t attack this disparity early on, these kids are headed quickly for a pretty dismal future in elementary school.”

Professor Fuller said blacks and poor whites also lagged behind the curve, suggesting that poverty remained a factor in predicting how well a young mind develops. But the drop-off in the cognitive scores of Hispanic toddlers, especially those from Mexican backgrounds, was steeper than for other groups and could not be explained by economic status alone, he said.

One possible explanation is that a high percentage of Mexican and Latin American immigrant mothers have less formal schooling than the average American mother, white or black, the study’s authors said. These mothers also tend to have more children than middle-class American families, which means the toddlers get less one-on-one attention from their parents.

“The reading activities, educational games and performing the ABCs for Grandma — so often witnessed in middle-class homes — are less consistently seen in poor Latino households,” Professor Fuller said.

The study is based on data collected on 8,114 infants born in 2001 and tracked through the first two years of life by the National Center for Education Statistics. The findings will be published this week in Maternal and Child Health Journal, and a companion report will appear this fall in the medical journal Pediatrics.

The analysis showed that at 9 to 15 months, Hispanic and white children performed equally on tests of basic cognitive skills, like understanding their mother’s speech and using words and gestures. But from 24 to 36 months, the Hispanic children fell about six months behind their white peers on measures like word comprehension, more complex speech and working with their mothers on simple tasks.

The study comes as the Obama administration has been pushing for more money to help prepare infants and toddlers for school. In September, the House passed an initiative that would channel $8 billion over eight years to states with plans to improve programs serving young children.

In addition, the economic stimulus package included $3 billion for Head Start preschools and for the Early Head Start program, which helps young parents stimulate their children’s mental development.

Eugene Garcia, an education professor at Arizona State University, said the Berkeley-led study confirmed findings by others that the children of Hispanic immigrants, for reasons that remain unclear, tend to fall behind white students by as much as a grade level by the third grade.

“It seems like what might be the most helpful with Latino kids is early intervention,” Dr. Garcia said.

Carmen Rodriguez, the director of the Columbia University Head Start in New York City, said there was a waiting list of parents, most of them Hispanic, who want to take Early Head Start classes with their children.

Dr. Rodriguez said the study’s findings might reflect a surge in interest in early childhood education on the part of middle-class Americans, rather than any deficiency in the immigrant homes.

“Any low-income toddler is disadvantaged if they don’t get this kind of stimulation,” she said.

Source: The New York Times – By James McKinley Jr.

Latino Nutrition Month Oldways Releases Latino Health Tool Kit

Target Latino thanks the Latino Nutrition Coalition and Oldways for allowing us to publish this important information for dissemination within our community. Let’s hope that we all work together for the betterment of our nutrition and that of our children.

—————-

BOSTON, September 15, 2009 – In celebration of Latino Nutrition Month from September 15 through October 15, Oldways and the Latino Nutrition Coalition (LNC) have released Latino Living – A Guide to Better Health Through Traditional Food and Active Lifestyles – for both consumers and health professionals.

“Latino Living was originally designed for health professionals and dietitians, but it is so user friendly and simple that it’s perfect for consumers from coast to coast,” said Sara Baer-Sinnott, Executive Vice President of Oldways.

Latin Diet Pyramid - Copyright 2009 Oldways Preservation & Exchange Trust - http://www.oldwayspt.org/

Latin Diet Pyramid – Copyright 2009 Oldways Preservation & Exchange Trust – http://www.oldwayspt.org/

For Consumers, the kit offers:

  • A 7-day Healthy Latino Meal Plan, with recipes and grocery list.
  • A bilingual Latino Lifestyle Calendar, featuring a tip-a-day for following the healthy Latin American diet.
  • New, illustrated, bilingual Latin American Diet Pyramid, with basic guidelines to help plan daily meals.

The following in both English and Spanish:

  • A list of Latin American super foods
  • Kitchen Strategies: time savers and smart swaps
  • Tip for Kids: cooking, lunches and snacks
  • Tips on how to exercise with your family

For Health Professionals and RDs, the kit offers:

  • All of the above, PLUS
  • Statistics concerning obesity, nutrition, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer rates occurring in the Latino American population.
  • A detailed explanation of the Latin American Diet Pyramid, along with basic guidelines that help plan daily meals.
  • Weekly Goal Tracking and 24-Hour Recall Sheets.

Consumers, health professionals and RDs can request this free resource (on CD-Rom or online) by emailing or calling Adriene Worthington (aworthington@oldwayspt.org, 617-896-4876.

Coinciding with National Hispanic Heritage Month, Latino Nutrition Month will introduce consumers to a variety of ways to cook, eat and enjoy the Latino diet pattern. The introduction of an updated Latin American Diet Pyramid will stress the importance of putting plant foods such as fruits, veggies, grains (mostly whole), nuts and peanuts, beans and spices at the core of one’s diet. Additionally, consumers can enter Oldways/LNC’s Latin American Diet Recipe Contest (see below) to win a variety of prizes.

See what else is happening during Latino Nutrition Month on the Oldways and LNC websites. These programs include:

1. An updated Camino Mágico, a downloadable, bi-lingual supermarket shopping guide to help Latino shoppers make healthy choices among the endless food options available at supermarkets today.

2. Latin American Diet Recipe Contest featured on the Oldways and LNC websites and on the Official Oldways Table Blog. Consumers should submit a recipe that uses at least two Latin American Diet products (list is featured on the Oldways Table Blog).  Winners will be drawn at the end of the month, and announced on our websites.  Prizes include wonderful Latino food products, autographed copies of our widely-praised book, The Oldways Table, chock-full of wonderful recipes and short essays about food and wine experiences, and the new poster of the Latin American Diet Pyramid.

3. A 2′ X 3′ poster with an updated illustration of the Latin American Diet Pyramid will be available at The Oldways Store on September 21, 2009.

Links:

Find Oldways on Twitter – OldwaysPT

Find the LNC on Twitter – LatinoNutrition

Oldways on Facebook – Become a Fan!

The Official Oldways Blog – The Oldways Table

About Oldways and the Latino Nutrition Coalition

Oldways is an internationally-respected non-profit, changing the way people eat through practical and positive programs grounded in science, traditions, and delicious foods and drinks.  The Latino Nutrition Coalition is an Oldways program inspiring Latinos to improve and maintain their health through traditional foods and active lifestyles. LNC members include: General Mills; Herdez; Splenda; La Moderna; Mission Foods; National Watermelon Promotion Board; The Peanut Institute; Soyfoods Association of North America; Splenda  Sweetener Products; United States Potato Board; and Wisconsin Milk  Marketing Board.  You can learn more at www.oldwayspt.org and www.latinonutrition.org.

Header photography credit: IStockPhoto

1st-Ever Sears National Hispanic Heritage Month Initiative

Introduces new bilingual social networking site for students and parents

HOFFMAN ESTATES, Ill., Sept. 15 /PRNewswire/ — Inspired by the many Hispanic families who help their children become the first to attend college, Sears Holdings has launched the PRIMERO Hispanic Heritage Scholarship(SM) and bilingual, social networking education website in celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month (September 15 – October 15).

In Spanish, “primero” means “first”. The PRIMERO scholarship awards up to $10,000 toward college costs for those who are “first” in their family to attend college, as well as those continuing the family’s tradition of attaining a higher education. In addition to applying for the scholarship, students and their parents can also learn about the college planning process via the PRIMERO Hispanic Heritage Scholarship(SM) site — www.shcprimerobeca.com. SHC also offers a scholarship to associates of Sears, Kmart, Lands’ End and Orchard Supply Hardware.

With more than 46 million Hispanics now living in the U.S. and more than 132 million expected by 2050*, the PRIMERO Hispanic Heritage Scholarship(SM) education initiative is one of the ways Sears Holdings is reaching out to the Hispanic community. Sears recently launched a fully Spanish-translated website, espanol.sears.com, giving Spanish-speaking customers full access to its wide range of home appliances, electronics and computers, outdoor living, lawn and garden, and tools. Product names and navigation are also translated in other categories, allowing our customers to browse our websites in whichever language best meets their needs.

“We are excited to launch the SHC PRIMERO Hispanic Heritage Scholarship(SM) and education website in honor of Hispanic Heritage Month,” said Nydia J. Sahagun, director, multicultural marketing, Sears Holdings Corporation. “This new initiative is a great way to support education, while providing information and resources for college-bound students and their parents in an engaging and interactive way.”

*2009 U.S. Census Bureau

The PRIMERO Hispanic Heritage Scholarship(SM) website is Sears Holdings’ first corporate social networking site focused on education. The website is a one-stop online destination for college planning, featuring special sections to demystify the process:

— Why College – Outlines the benefits of going to college while busting myths versus facts about college

— The Plan – Tells you what to do first to start planning for college, no matter where you are in the process

— The Search – Details the types of colleges you can choose from while helping you find a match with the type of college that best fits you

— The Process – Gives you a monthly “to-do” list, checklist and information on college application requirements and on how to apply

— The Money – Provides information on typical tuition costs and how to navigate through financial aid

— At College – Offers tips for success once in college

— Blogs – Give first-hand tips from real college students on what to expect when applying for or attending college

According to Diverseeducation.com, although 98% of Hispanic high school students want to attend college, only 25% of college-aged Hispanics (18-24) are enrolled. This low attendance rate is attributed to many factors including lack of experience, resources and available/understandable information in many Hispanic communities. The PRIMERO Hispanic Heritage Scholarship(SM) and website aims to close the informational gap for Hispanics.

“We commend Sears Holdings for providing scholarship opportunities, especially during a time when a large emerging population is primarily Hispanic,” said Antonio Flores, president and CEO of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU). “The reality is that without programs like PRIMERO Hispanic Heritage Scholarship(SM), attaining a higher education would not be possible for many Hispanics.

No purchase is necessary. Void in Maine and where prohibited. High school and college students from all ethnic backgrounds who are residents of the 50 United States (except ME), plus the District of Columbia, and are between the ages of 16 and 22, inclusive with a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale (or the equivalent) are encouraged to apply for the PRIMERO Hispanic Heritage Scholarship(SM). Awards include a scholarship for college worth up to $10,000 (1 winner), up to $5,000 (1 winner) or up to $2,500 (2 winners), or one of 10 Sears-Kmart ‘Back to Campus” kits, valued at $250 each. Entries must be received or postmarked by October 15, 2009, at 11:59 p.m. EST. For Official Rules, go to www.shcprimerobeca.com/es/apply-now/rules (Spanish) or www.shcprimerobeca.com/en/apply-now/rules (English). For more information on the PRIMERO Hispanic Heritage Scholarship(SM) or college preparation, visit www.shcprimerobeca.com. For more information on Sears and Kmart, visit www.sears.com or www.kmart.com. Sponsor: Sears Holdings Corporation, 3333 Beverly Road, Hoffman Estates, IL 60179.

About Sears Holdings Corporation

Sears Holdings Corporation is the nation’s fourth largest broadline retailer with approximately 3,900 full-line and specialty retail stores in the United States and Canada. Sears Holdings is the leading home appliance retailer as well as a leader in tools, lawn and garden, home electronics and automotive repair and maintenance. Key proprietary brands include Kenmore, Craftsman and DieHard, and a broad apparel offering, including such well-known labels as Lands’ End, Jaclyn Smith and Joe Boxer, as well as the Apostrophe and Covington brands. It also has Martha Stewart Everyday products, which are offered exclusively in the U.S. by Kmart. We are the nation’s largest provider of home services, with more than 12 million service calls made annually. Sears Holdings Corporation operates through its subsidiaries, including Sears, Roebuck and Co. and Kmart Corporation. For more information, visit Sears Holdings’ website at www.searsholdings.com.

Source: Sears Holdings Corporation

Snacking differences between Hispanics, general population

Snacking Differences: Hispanic Parents More Likely to Reward Kids with Snacks

Study highlights snacking differences between Hispanics, general population

Study highlights snacking differences between Hispanics, general population

Dipped, topped or eaten plain, America loves snacks. But new research from Mintel shows that not all Americans snack the same. Hispanics, the fastest growing population in the US, differ significantly in their snacking habits.

Hispanic adults are twice as likely as non-Hispanics to reward their children’s good behavior with salty snacks (41% versus 19%). But salty snack consumption among Hispanic adults is low, possibly due to traditional food preferences. Of five snacks-potato chips, pretzels, popcorn, nuts and corn/tortilla chips/cheese snacks-only 65% of Hispanics report eating three or more regularly (versus 80% of the general population).

Other key snacking differences findings

  • Hispanics emphasize mealtime, with snacks often perceived as appetite-spoilers. Mintel found Hispanics more interested in packages with ’small portions’ than the general population
  • Frozen snack usage is extremely low among less acculturated Hispanics, but more acculturated Hispanics eat them at the same rate as other Americans
  • Hispanic children show higher preference for healthy snacks like yogurt, cheese, raw veggies and nuts than non-Hispanic children

’Manufacturers need to understand that Hispanic’s eating habits are not the same as the general population’s,’ explains Leylha Ahuile, multicultural expert at Mintel. ’Even among Hispanics, we see huge variety in snacking, eating and drinking tendencies.’ Ahuile emphasizes the importance of not viewing Hispanics as one homogenous group. ’Understanding acculturation and how Hispanics differ from one another is key for companies hoping to tap into this rapidly growing market.’

Source: http://www.mintel.com