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SABEResPODER & Best Buy Promote Informed Shopping Decisions

The initiative aims at educating the Latino community on how best to take advantage of the technology at their reach.

Best Buy unites with SABEResPODER to educate the Hispanic community about how to get the most out of the latest technology and understand their rights as consumers.

Various studies show that Latinos purchase more televisions, digital cameras, cell phones, and computers than the average population. However, Raul P. Lomeli-Azoubel, Executive Chairman for SABEResPODER, said that, “the statistics also reveal a different reality: the technological advances, that serve to make our lives easier, are not being used to their full potential.”

For this reason, SABEResPODER, with Best Buy’s support, has published an educational guide about “New Technologies” with the main objective of sharing vital information, so that consumers can learn more about their options.

The educational campaign also includes an informative video on the subject and workshops that will be offered to community groups. The goal of the initiative is to promote smarter, more informed, consumer electronic shopping, and help the community purchase products that actually meet their specific needs.

“Our knowledgeable, non-commission sales specialists are trained specifically to help our customers find the right product solution to best fit their individual needs,” says Marco Orozco from Best Buy. “We believe our sales specialists’ primary role is to listen to the needs of our customers and then inform and educate them on their product options.”

The initiative was presented during a community event at the Mexican Consulate in Los Angeles, where Consul General Juan Marcos Gutierrez congratulated SABEResPODER for this campaign focused on educating the community and empowering them to make informed purchasing decisions. The Consul General also made the following recommendation to the audience: “remember to first educate yourself on your options in order to avoid mistakes that are caused by impulse shopping.”

The recurring theme at the event was for consumers to make informed purchases to ensure that technology delivers on its promises; and to learn how technology can improve the quality of life in a digital world.

About SABEResPODER, Inc.

SABEResPODER provides corporations, agencies and non-profit entities with powerful and exclusive educational media solutions for gaining incremental customers while assisting Spanish-dominant consumers to become more informed, confident and active consumers and participants in American society. SABEResPODER is a targeted Spanish-language multimedia network reaching Spanish dominant consumers at a key transition point when they are actively pursuing resources to further establish their lives in the United States. For more information about SABEResPODER, visit www.saberespoder.com.

About Best Buy Co., Inc.

With operations in the United States, Canada, Europe, China and Mexico, Best Buy is a multinational retailer of technology and entertainment products and services with a commitment to growth and innovation. Approximately 155,000 employees apply their talents to help bring the benefits of these brands to life for customers through retail locations, multiple call centers and Web sites, in-home solutions, product delivery and activities in our communities. Community partnership is central to the way we do business at Best Buy. In fiscal 2009, Best Buy donated a combined $33.4 million to improve the vitality of the communities where their employees and customers live and work. For more information about Best Buy, visit www.bestbuy.com


SOURCE SABEResPODER

Managers’ Hiring Practices Vary By Race & Ethnicity

Managers' Hiring Practices Vary By Race, Ethnicity Says University of Miami Study

Managers’ Hiring Practices Vary By Race, Ethnicity Says University of Miami Study

Managers’ Hiring Practices Vary By Race, Ethnicity Says University of Miami Study

White, Asian and Hispanic managers tend to hire more whites and fewer blacks than black managers do, according to a new study out of the University of Miami School of Business Administration.

Using more than two years of personnel data from a large U.S. retail chain, the study found that when a black manager in a typical store is replaced by a white, Asian or Hispanic manager, the share of newly hired blacks falls from 21 to 17 percent, and the share of whites hired rises from 60 to 64 percent. The effect is even stronger for stores located in the South, where the replacement of a black manager causes the share of newly hired blacks to fall from 29 to 21 percent. In locations with large Hispanic populations, Hispanics hire more Hispanics and fewer whites than white managers. The study is out this month in the Journal of Labor Economics.

The finding is clear evidence that the race or ethnicity of those who make hiring decisions can have a strong impact in the racial makeup of a company’s workforce, says Laura Giuliano, an assistant professor of economics at the University of Miami School of Business, who authored the study with David Levine and Jonathan Leonard from the University of California, Berkeley.

How strong is the impact? Consider a typical store with 40 employees located in the Southern U.S. According to the data, replacing a black manager with a non-black manager would result in the replacement of three to four black workers with white workers over the course of one year.

The effect in a non-Southern store would also be significant, if a bit more subtle. Replacing a black manager in a non-Southern store would result in one black worker being replaced by a white worker over a year.

“From the viewpoint of a district manager who is observing just a small sample of stores, this change might go unnoticed or appear insignificant,” Giuliano said. “However, the change may appear more significant from the point of view of job seekers — and especially black job seekers. In fact, the change in non-Southern stores amounts to a proportional decline of 15 percent in the number of blacks employed.”

The data used by Giuliano and her colleagues were especially well suited to sorting out the role race plays in hiring. While previous studies have also suggested that manager race plays a role, those studies have been unable to distinguish that role from other factors such as the demographic makeup of the local labor pool. Giuliano and her colleagues were able to isolate the race factor by tracking individual stores that experienced a change of manager.

“This means we can compare the hiring patterns of consecutive managers of different races in the same store,” she said. “Hence we can isolate the effect of a manager’s race by comparing the hiring patterns of managers when they hire from similar labor pools under similar conditions.”

The researchers were also able to use their data to offer some partial explanations for why these differences in hiring patterns exist.

They found that both black and non-black managers tend to hire people who live close to them. So if black managers live in predominantly black neighborhoods, their hiring network is also likely to be predominantly black.

The research also suggests that black managers hire fewer whites because whites may be less willing to work for black managers. The study found that when a white manager is replaced with a black manager, the rate at which white workers quit their jobs increases by 15 percent.

“We interpret this increase in the white quit rate as evidence of discriminatory sorting by white job seekers,” the authors write. “It implies that whites who dislike working for black managers often avoid working for black managers in the first place.”

About the University of Miami School of Business Administration

The University of Miami School of Business Administration is a comprehensive business school, offering undergraduate business, full-time MBA, Executive MBA, MS, PhD and non-degree executive education programs. One of 12 colleges and schools at the University of Miami, the School is located in a major hub of international trade and commerce and acclaimed for the global orientation and diversity of its faculty, students and curriculum. The School delivers its programs at its main campus in Coral Gables as well as at locations across Florida and abroad. More information about the University of Miami School of Business can be found at www.bus.miami.edu.

NOTE TO EDITORS: A full copy of the study is available upon request. The University of Miami has a television studio on campus and can provide live expert interviews via satellite or Vyvx fiber.

    Media Contact:
    Tracy Simon
    University of Miami School of Business Administration
    267-679-2774
    tsimon@sba.umiami.edu

SOURCE University of Miami School of Business Administration

Automotive Website Targets Hispanic Car Buyers and Sellers

AutosAhora.com helps Hispanic consumers and dealerships targeting Hispanics to list their cars for sale.

Automotive Website Targets Hispanic Car Buyers and Sellers

Automotive Website Targets Hispanic Car Buyers and Sellers

AutosAhora.com, the one-stop online resource for Hispanic new and used car buyers now offers consumers and dealerships the ability to sell their cars online. Consumers can list their cars for sale on the site for free for thirty days, and dealerships can upload extensive inventory for a low monthly fee. AutosAhora.com allows consumers and dealerships alike, to manage their offers and listings with a simple interface and allows dealerships to personalize their ads to reinforce their brand image at the local and national level.

Automotive Website Targets Hispanic Car Buyers and Sellers

AutosAhora.com is one of the few comprehensive online resources that allows Hispanics to shop for a car, sell a car and obtain financing entirely in English and Spanish. AutosAhora.com also features articles on the new government sponsored “Cash for Clunkers” program and calculators that help consumers understand how much they can afford.

Source: AutosAhora.com

Hispanic Heritage Month: Sept. 15 – Oct. 15

Origin of the Hispanic Heritage Month

In September 1968, Congress authorized President Lyndon B. Johnson to proclaim National Hispanic Heritage Week, which was observed during the week that included Sept. 15 and Sept. 16. The observance was expanded in 1988 to a month long celebration (Sept. 15 – Oct. 15). America celebrates the culture and traditions of those who trace their roots to Spain, Mexico and the Spanish-speaking nations of Central America, South America and the Caribbean. Sept. 15 was chosen as the starting point for the celebration because it is the anniversary of independence of five Latin American countries: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. In addition, Mexico and Chile celebrate their independence days on Sept. 16 and Sept. 18, respectively.

Population

46.9 million

The estimated Hispanic population of the United States as of July 1, 2008, making people of Hispanic origin the nation’s largest ethnic or race minority. Hispanics constituted 15 percent of the nation’s total population. In addition, there are approximately 4 million residents of Puerto Rico.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html and http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013049.html

More than 1

…of every two people added to the nation’s population between July 1, 2007, and July 1, 2008, was Hispanic. There were 1.5 million Hispanics added to the population during the period.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html

3.2%

Percentage increase in the Hispanic population between July 1, 2007, and July 1, 2008, making Hispanics the fastest-growing minority group.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html

132.8 million

The projected Hispanic population of the United States on July 1, 2050. According to this projection, Hispanics will constitute 30 percent of the nation’s population by that date.

Source: Population projections http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/012496.html

22.4 million

The nation’s Hispanic population during the 1990 Census — less than half the current total.

Source: The Hispanic Population: 2000 http://www.census.gov/prod/2001pubs/c2kbr01-3.pdf

2nd

Ranking of the size of the U.S. Hispanic population worldwide, as of 2008. Only Mexico (110 million) had a larger Hispanic population than the United States (46.9 million).

Source: International Data Base http://www.census.gov/ipc/nas/content/live/hispanic/idbsum.html and population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html

64%

The percentage of Hispanic-origin people in the United States who were of Mexican background in 2007. Another 9 percent were of Puerto Rican background, with 3.5 percent Cuban, 3.1 percent Salvadoran and 2.7 percent Dominican. The remainder were of some other Central American, South American or other Hispanic or Latino origin.

Source: 2007 American Community Surveyhttp://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

About 45 percent of the nation’s Dominicans lived in New York City in 2007 and about half of the nation’s Cubans in Miami-Dade County, Fla.

Source: 2007 American Community Survey http://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

25%

Percentage of children younger than 5 who were Hispanic in 2008. All in all, Hispanics comprised 22 percent of children younger than 18.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html

27.7 years

Median age of the Hispanic population in 2008. This compared with 36.8 years for the population as a whole.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html

107

Number of Hispanic males in 2008 per every 100 Hispanic females. This was in sharp contrast to the overall population, which had 97 males per every 100 females.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html

States and Counties

48%

The percentage of the Hispanic-origin population that lived in California or Texas in 2008. California was home to 13.5 million Hispanics, and Texas was home to 8.9 million.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

16

The number of states with at least a half-million Hispanic residents — Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Massachusetts, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia and Washington.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

45%

The percentage of New Mexico’s population that was Hispanic in 2008, the highest of any state. Hispanics also made up at least one fifth of the population in California and Texas, at 37 percent each, Arizona (30 percent), Nevada (26 percent), Florida (21 percent) and Colorado (20 percent). New Mexico had 891,000 Hispanics.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

The Carolinas

The states with the highest percentage increases in Hispanic population between July 1, 2007, and July 1, 2008. South Carolina’s increase was 7.7 percent and North Carolina’s was 7.4 percent.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

4.7 million

The Hispanic population of Los Angeles County, Calif., in 2008 — the largest of any county in the nation. Los Angeles County also had the biggest numerical increase in the Hispanic population (67,000) since July 2007.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

97%

Proportion of the population of Starr County, Texas, that was Hispanic as of 2008, which led the nation. All of the top 10 counties in this category were in Texas.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

48

Number of the nation’s 3,142 counties that are majority-Hispanic.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

15%

Percent increase in the Hispanic population in Luzerne County, Pa., from July 1, 2007, to July 1, 2008. Among all counties with 2007 Hispanic populations of at least 10,000, Luzerne topped the nation in this category. Luzerne’s county seat is Wilkes-Barre.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

313,000

The increase in California’s Hispanic population between July 1, 2007, and July 1, 2008, which led all states. Texas (305,000) and Florida (111,000) also recorded large increases.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

20

Number of states in which Hispanics are the largest minority group. These states are Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Massachusetts, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, Texas, Utah, Washington and Wyoming.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

Businesses

Source for statements in this section: Hispanic-owned Firms: 2002http://www.census.gov/csd/sbo/hispanic2002.htm

1.6 million

The number of Hispanic-owned businesses in 2002.

Nearly 43 percent of Hispanic-owned firms operated in construction; administrative and support, and waste management and remediation services; and other services, such as personal services, and repair and maintenance. Retail and wholesale trade accounted for nearly 36 percent of Hispanic-owned business revenue.

Counties with the highest number of Hispanic-owned firms were Los Angeles County (188,422); Miami-Dade County (163,187); and Harris County, Texas (61,934).

Triple

The rate of growth of Hispanic-owned businesses between 1997 and 2002 (31 percent) compared with the national average (10 percent) for all businesses.

$222 billion

Revenue generated by Hispanic-owned businesses in 2002, up 19 percent from 1997.

44.6%

…of all Hispanic-owned firms were owned by people of Mexican origin (Mexican, Mexican-American or Chicano).

29,168

Number of Hispanic-owned firms with receipts of $1 million or more.

Families and Children

10.4 million

The number of Hispanic family households in the United States in 2008. Of these households, 62 percent included children younger than 18.

Source: Families and Living Arrangements http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/families_households/013378.html

66%

The percentage of Hispanic family households consisting of a married couple.

Source: Families and Living Arrangements http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/families_households/013378.html

43%

The percentage of Hispanic family households consisting of a married couple with children younger than 18.

Source: Families and Living Arrangements http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/families_households/013378.html

70%

Percentage of Hispanic children living with two parents.

Source: Families and Living Arrangements http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/families_households/013378.html

Spanish Language

35 million

The number of U.S. residents 5 and older who spoke Spanish at home in 2007. Those who hablan espanol constituted 12 percent of U.S. residents. More than half of these Spanish speakers spoke English “very well.”

Source: 2007 American Community Survey http://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

4

Number of states where at least one-in-five residents spoke Spanish at home in 2007 — Arizona, California, New Mexico and Texas.

Source: 2007 American Community Survey http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/american_community_survey_acs/012634.html

78%

Percentage of Hispanics 5 and older who spoke Spanish at home in 2007.

Source: 2007 American Community Surveyhttp://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

Income, Poverty and Health Insurance

$38,679

The median income of Hispanic households in 2007, statistically unchanged from the previous year after adjusting for inflation.

Source: Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2007 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/income_wealth/012528.html

21.5%

The poverty rate among Hispanics in 2007, up from 20.6 percent in 2006.

Source: Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2007 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/income_wealth/012528.html

32.1%

The percentage of Hispanics who lacked health insurance in 2007, down from 34.1 percent in 2006.

Source: Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2007 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/income_wealth/012528.html

Education

53%

The percentage of Hispanic 4-year-olds enrolled in nursery school in 2007, up from 43 percent in 1997 and 21 percent in 1987.

Source: School Enrollment – Social and Economic Characteristics of Students: October 2007http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013391.html

62%

The percentage of Hispanics 25 and older who had at least a high school education in 2008.

Source: Educational Attainment in the United States: 2008 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013618.html

13%

The percentage of the Hispanic population 25 and older with a bachelor’s degree or higher in 2008.

Source: Educational Attainment in the United States: 2008 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013618.html

3.6 million

The number of Hispanics 18 and older who had at least a bachelor’s degree in 2008.

Source: Educational Attainment in the United States: 2008 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013618.html

1 million

Number of Hispanics 25 and older with advanced degrees in 2008 (e.g., master’s, professional, doctorate).

Source: Educational Attainment in the United States: 2008 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013618.html

12%

Percentage of full-time college students (both undergraduate and graduate students) in October 2007 who were Hispanic, up from 10 percent in 2006.

Source: School Enrollment – Social and Economic Characteristics of Students: October 2007 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013391.html

20%

Percentage of elementary and high school students combined who were Hispanic.

Source: School Enrollment – Social and Economic Characteristics of Students: October 2007 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013391.html

Names

4

The number of Hispanic surnames ranked among the 15 most common in 2000. It was the first time that a Hispanic surname reached the top 15 during a census. Garcia was the most frequent Hispanic surname, occurring 858,289 times and placing eighth on the list — up from 18th in 1990. Rodriguez (ninth), Martinez (11th) and Hernandez (15th) were the next most common Hispanic surnames.

Source: Census 2000 Genealogy http://www.census.gov/genealogy/nas/content/live/hispanic/freqnames2k.html

Jobs

67%

Percentage of Hispanics 16 and older who were in the civilian labor force in 2007.

Source: 2007 American Community Survey http://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

18%

The percentage of Hispanics 16 or older who worked in management, professional and related occupations in 2007. The same percentage worked in production, transportation and material moving occupations. Another 16 percent worked in construction, extraction, maintenance and repair occupations. Approximately 24 percent of Hispanics 16 or older worked in service occupations; 21 percent in sales and office occupations; and 2 percent in farming, fishing and forestry occupations.

Source: 2007 American Community Survey http://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

79,400

Number of Hispanic chief executives. In addition, 50,866 physicians and surgeons; 48,720 postsecondary teachers; 38,532 lawyers; and 2,726 news analysts, reporters and correspondents are Hispanic.

Source: Upcoming Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2010, Table 603 http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/

Voting

5.6 million

The number of Hispanic citizens who reported voting in the 2006 congressional elections. The percentage of Hispanic citizens voting — about 32 percent — did not change statistically from four years earlier.

Source: Voting and Registration in the Election of November 2006 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/voting/012234.html

Serving our Country

1.1 million

The number of Hispanic veterans of the U.S. armed forces.

Source: 2007 American Community Survey http://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

Following is a list of observances typically covered by the Census Bureau’s Facts for Features series:

    African-American History Month (February)    Labor Day
    Super Bowl                                   Grandparents Day
    Valentine's Day (Feb. 14)                    Hispanic Heritage Month
    Women's History Month (March)                 (Sept. 15-Oct. 15)
    Irish-American Heritage Month (March)/       Unmarried and Single
     St. Patrick's Day (March 17)                 Americans Week
    Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month (May)  Halloween (Oct. 31)
    Older Americans Month (May)                  American Indian/Alaska
    Cinco de Mayo (May 5)                         Native Heritage Month
    Mother's Day                                  (November)
    Father's Day                                 Veterans Day (Nov. 11)
    The Fourth of July (July 4)                  Thanksgiving Day
    Anniversary of Americans with                The Holiday Season
     Disabilities Act (July 26)                   (December)
    Back to School (August)

Editor’s note: The preceding data were collected from a variety of sources and may be subject to sampling variability and other sources of error. Facts for Features are customarily released about two months before an observance in order to accommodate magazine production timelines. Questions or comments should be directed to the Census Bureau’s Public Information Office: telephone: 301-763-3030; fax: 301-763-3762; or e-mail: pio@census.gov.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

LG Electronics Reorganizes Manufacturing Facilities in Mexico

LG Electronics Reorganizes Manufacturing Facilities, Increases Investment in Mexico

MEXICO CITY, July 6 /PRNewswire/ — LG Electronics is planning to reorganize manufacturing plants and expand investments in Mexico to maximize efficiency and competitiveness.

LG Electronics in Mexico

LG Electronics in Mexico

The company will invest an additional US$100 million over the next three years, increasing total production capacity to US$4 billion. This is designed to generate synergies among plants in Mexico and improve cash flow during the current global recession, while further improving capabilities to serve customers in North, Central and South America.

LG Electronics currently operates three manufacturing facilities in Mexico: Reynosa and Mexicali producing TVs and Monterrey making refrigerators and electric ovens. The reorganization program, which is now under way, includes:

  • Consolidation of LCD TV manufacturing plants — Two separate plants in Reynosa and Mexicali will be integrated into one consolidated plant in Reynosa to produce mid-large size and premium TVs. Consolidation is expected to be completed by September 2009.
  • Outsourcing of small- and medium-size LCD TVs — LG Electronics plans to expand its collaboration with an external manufacturing partner in Mexico.
  • Withdrawal from mobile phone manufacturing in Mexicali — With the closure of the Mexicali plant in June, handsets for North America will be produced in Korea and China.
  • Expansion of Monterrey plant capabilities — The refrigerator and electric oven manufacturing Monterrey plant will start producing gas ovens by the end of 2009.
  • Localization of components — LG Electronics will source more components in Mexico to gain cost competitiveness

Planned increases in investment and employment include:

  • Increased investment — LG Electronics plans to invest more than US$100 million in Mexico over the next three years.
  • Expanded production capacity — LG will expand production capacity to US$4 billion by 2012, up from US$2.6 billion in 2008.
  • Additional employment — Adding new production lines in Reynosa will generate about 1,200 new jobs and theMonterrey plant is planning to hire 1,300 additional workers. Localizing component production will help boost recruitment opportunities in Mexico.
  • Retirement benefits and outplacement support — All 500 Mexicali employees will be eligible for positions inReynosa or Monterrey. Retiring employees will receive pensions or outplacement support services consistent with local labor laws.

About LG Electronics, Inc.

LG Electronics, Inc. (KSE: 066570.KS) is a global leader and technology innovator in consumer electronics, mobile communications and home appliances, employing more than 84,000 people working in 115 operations including 84 subsidiaries around the world. With 2008 global sales of $44.7 billion, LG comprises of five business units – Home Entertainment, Mobile Communications, Home Appliance, Air Conditioning and Business Solutions. LG is one of the world’s leading producers of flat panel TVs, audio and video products, mobile handsets, air conditioners and washing machines. LG has signed a long-term agreement to become both A Global Partner of Formula 1(TM) and A Technology Partner of Formula 1(TM). As part of this top-level association, LG acquires exclusive designations and marketing rights as the official consumer electronics, mobile phone and data processor of this global sporting event. For more information, please visit www.lge.com.

Source:LGE

Hispanic Business Magazine Announces 500 Largest U.S. Hispanic-owned Companies

SANTA BARBARA, Calif., June 29 /PRNewswire/ — The June 2009 issue of Hispanic Business magazine features the 27th annual Hispanic Business 500, the benchmark directory of the 500 largest Hispanic-owned companies in the United States.
The annual Hispanic Business 500 directory is widely recognized as the barometer of the U.S. Hispanic economy. Cumulative revenues for the directory totaled $36.15 billion, a slight increase from 2008, which totaled $36.10 billion. A searchable directory of the 2009 Hispanic Business 500 is available now on the magazine’s companion web site, HispanicBusiness.com.
For the third straight year, the HB 500’s top-ranked company was the aptly named Brightstar, a global telecom wholesaler. Though the company posted a dip in revenue of 2.35 percent, it still managed to bring in $3.6 billion.
The surprising bright spot of this year’s list was the financial sector, which posted an impressive 17.2 percent boost in revenues. Pan-American Life Insurance Co. of New Orleans was among the successful businesses in this category, showing an 11 percent gain in revenue over the previous year, as well as a healthy 6 percent profit.
Companies included in the 500 must show at least 51 percent ownership by Hispanic U.S. citizens and must maintain headquarters in one of the 50 states or Washington, D.C. Principals must be U.S. citizens.
For more information, go to http://www.hispanicbusiness.com/rankings/hispanic_companies/
About Hispanic Business Media
For 30 years Hispanic Business Media has been the authoritative source for the latest trends, research and reporting on the growth of the U.S. Hispanic consumer market and the Hispanic enterprise and professional sectors.
Hispanic Business Media properties provide innovative branding and targeted marketing solutions across multiple platforms:
— Award-winning print editorial via Hispanic Business Magazine, which provides readers in the United States and around the world with the most relevant and data-driven news on the U.S. Hispanic economy. — Fresh, real-time online content and interaction via HispanicBusiness.com. The site specializes in b2b daily news, branded content from Hispanic Business magazine, original postings by hb.com writers and some user-generated content. — Hispanic Business Events, which feature and draw the nation’s most affluent and influential Hispanic leaders. Examples include the Hispanic Business magazine EOY Awards for entrepreneurial excellence; the CEO Capital Markets Roundtable; and the Woman of the Year (WOY) Awards. — Unique data reports on the U.S. Hispanic sector developed by HispanTelligence, the research arm of Hispanic Business Media. — Diversity recruiting and development services from HireDiversity.com.
HispanicBusiness magazine, HispanicBusiness.com, Hispanic Business magazine EOY, HireDiversity.com and HispanTelligence are registered trademarks of Hispanic Business Inc. 2008 Hispanic Business Inc. All rights reserved. Hispanic Business Media
Web Site: http://www.hispanicbusiness.com/
Source: PR Newswire

SANTA BARBARA, Calif., June 29 /PRNewswire/ — The June 2009 issue of Hispanic Business magazine features the 27th annual Hispanic Business 500, the benchmark directory of the 500 largest Hispanic-owned companies in the United States.

The annual Hispanic Business 500 directory is widely recognized as the barometer of the U.S. Hispanic economy. Cumulative revenues for the directory totaled $36.15 billion, a slight increase from 2008, which totaled $36.10 billion. A searchable directory of the 2009 Hispanic Business 500 is available now on the magazine’s companion web site, HispanicBusiness.com.

For the third straight year, the HB 500’s top-ranked company was the aptly named Brightstar, a global telecom wholesaler. Though the company posted a dip in revenue of 2.35 percent, it still managed to bring in $3.6 billion.

The surprising bright spot of this year’s list was the financial sector, which posted an impressive 17.2 percent boost in revenues. Pan-American Life Insurance Co. of New Orleans was among the successful businesses in this category, showing an 11 percent gain in revenue over the previous year, as well as a healthy 6 percent profit.

Companies included in the 500 must show at least 51 percent ownership by Hispanic U.S. citizens and must maintain headquarters in one of the 50 states or Washington, D.C. Principals must be U.S. citizens.

For more information, go to http://www.hispanicbusiness.com/rankings/hispanic_companies/

About Hispanic Business Media
For 30 years Hispanic Business Media has been the authoritative source for the latest trends, research and reporting on the growth of the U.S. Hispanic consumer market and the Hispanic enterprise and professional sectors.
Hispanic Business Media properties provide innovative branding and targeted marketing solutions across multiple platforms:
— Award-winning print editorial via Hispanic Business Magazine, which provides readers in the United States and around the world with the most relevant and data-driven news on the U.S. Hispanic economy. — Fresh, real-time online content and interaction via HispanicBusiness.com. The site specializes in b2b daily news, branded content from Hispanic Business magazine, original postings by hb.com writers and some user-generated content. — Hispanic Business Events, which feature and draw the nation’s most affluent and influential Hispanic leaders. Examples include the Hispanic Business magazine EOY Awards for entrepreneurial excellence; the CEO Capital Markets Roundtable; and the Woman of the Year (WOY) Awards. — Unique data reports on the U.S. Hispanic sector developed by HispanTelligence, the research arm of Hispanic Business Media. — Diversity recruiting and development services from HireDiversity.com.
HispanicBusiness magazine, HispanicBusiness.com, Hispanic Business magazine EOY, HireDiversity.com and HispanTelligence are registered trademarks of Hispanic Business Inc. 2008 Hispanic Business Inc. All rights reserved. Hispanic Business Media
Web Site: http://www.hispanicbusiness.com/
Source: PR Newswire

Salsarita’s Fresh Cantina Strong Growth in First Half of 2009

Rapidly Growing Fresh-Mex Franchise Opens Four New Restaurants; Signs Agreements for 28 New Locations with Goal of 200 Restaurants by 2012

Salsarita's Fresh Cantina, one of the nation's fastest growing, fast-casual Mexican restaurant chains

Salsarita’s Fresh Cantina, one of the nation’s fastest growing, fast-casual Mexican restaurant chains

CHARLOTTE, N.C., June 22 /PRNewswire/ –Salsarita’s Fresh Cantina, one of the nation’s fastest growing, fast-casual Mexican restaurant chains has experienced great success in 2009 with the opening of four new restaurants and signed agreements for 28 more locations in the U.S. and Puerto Rico. The company is currently closing in on its first hundred restaurants with the goal of opening 200 restaurants by 2012.

With new locations opening across the country, the company is quickly gaining brand recognition and a reputation for quality and legendary hospitality. Despite the economic downturn, Salsarita’s has announced that Minneapolis,Jacksonville, Detroit, Raleigh-Durham, Birmingham, Nashville, Upstate New York and Baltimore will be key markets for its 2009 expansion plans.

“We are very excited about the progress we’ve made in the first half of 2009 and are looking to expand our high-quality, Fresh-Mexican concept to new and existing markets across the country,” said Paul Mangiamele, president and CEO, Salsarita’s Fresh Cantina. “With successful penetration in select southern and northeastern markets, Salsarita’s is setting its sights on building a nationally competitive franchise brand.”

Most recently, Salsarita’s opened two restaurants in Charlotte, NC and single units in Murfreesboro and Knoxville, TN.A 20 unit store development agreement was signed in the Upstate New York region and agreements with franchisees have been signed in Clarence, NY, Overland Park, KS, Greenville, NC and Puerto Rico.

Salsarita’s is currently looking for qualified candidates with food service, operations or real estate experience to join its team as area representatives, area developers or single-unit franchisees. The estimated initial investment is between$296,700 and $577,100 depending on the real estate selection ranging from 2,200 to 2,700 square-feet, which is inclusive of the $25,000 franchise fee. The company’s comprehensive training and support program includes a three-week Burrito Boot Camp at the corporate headquarters, pre- and post-grand opening on-site support and ongoing business coaching.

“With more customers visiting fast-casual concepts instead of traditional full-service, sit-down restaurants, Salsarita’s is well positioned to succeed during this time of economic uncertainty,” said Mangiamele. “Fresh-Mexican is an up and coming concept and Salsarita’s fills this growing niche in the franchise industry.”

Salsarita’s specializes in serving made-to-order burritos, tacos, tortilla, pizza’s and taco salads. Prepared fresh-daily in each restaurant, guests can enjoy high-quality dishes featuring ground beef, grilled chicken, grilled steak, or pork, grilled shrimp and fresh vegetables. Salsarita’s also offers a choice of 13 delicious fillings and four homemade salsas. Every order is prepared in full view of customers in a 700-square-foot display kitchen with a contemporary Hispanic motif.

Source: Salsarita’s Fresh Cantina

More Grocery Chains Say Bienvenidos to the Hispanic Market

Arroz con leche. Comfort food Latin style. #youeatwithyoureyesfirst

Arroz con leche. Comfort food Latin style. #youeatwithyoureyesfirst

With the popularity of cooking Mexican cuisine at home on the rise, and the fast-growing Hispanic-American population, it’s no surprise that retailers, specifically grocers, are paying more attention to the Hispanic markets. More and more stores are bringing the Hispanic foods out of the ethnic aisle and into the mainstream sections of the stores.

Supermarket chains, like Publix, now offer Mexican spices among the parsley and thyme, and queso fresco and chorizo can be found next to the Parmigiano-Regianno and Roquefort in the refrigerator cases. National chain Walmart is also aiming to appeal to Hispanic shoppers with two test Supermercados debuting in Houston and Phoenix. Likewise, Sam’s Club is opening a Hispanic-oriented store called Mas this Summer in Houston.
Although the recession might not be a good time to develop new cultural marketing strategies, according to a report by the Food Marketing Institute, Hispanic consumers shop for groceries more often than the average American. They also cook from scratch more and purchase more fresh ingredients. Since I’m a huge fan of embracing all types of cuisine, I’m happy to hear that Mexican food items will be easier to find. How do you feel about the news?

With the popularity of cooking Mexican cuisine at home on the rise, and the fast-growing Hispanic-American population, it’s no surprise that retailers, specifically grocery chains, are paying more attention to the Hispanic markets. More and more stores are bringing the Hispanic foods out of the ethnic aisle and into the mainstream sections of the stores.

Supermarket and grocery chains, like Publix, now offer Mexican spices among the parsley and thyme, and queso fresco and chorizo can be found next to the Parmigiano-Regianno and Roquefort in the refrigerator cases. National chain Walmart is also aiming to appeal to Hispanic shoppers with two test Supermercados debuting in Houston and Phoenix. Likewise, Sam’s Club is opening a Hispanic-oriented store called Mas this Summer in Houston.

According to a report by the Food Marketing Institute, Hispanic consumers shop for groceries more often than the average American. They also cook from scratch more and purchase more fresh ingredients. Since I’m a huge fan of embracing all types of cuisine, I’m happy to hear that Mexican food items will be easier to find. How do you feel about the news?

Source: Partysugar – More Grocery Chains Say Bienvenidos to the Hispanic Market
Arroz con leche. Comfort food Latin style. #youeatwithyoureyesfirst

Arroz con leche. Comfort food Latin style. #youeatwithyoureyesfirst

Jones Soda Co. celebrates Hispanic heritage with new flavors

SEATTLE, Wash. – Jones Soda Co. is excited to introduce a new collection of Spanish labels and soda flavors honoring the culture and spirit of Hispanics living in America. This collection stems from numerous requests from Jones Soda fans, and features Spanish labels and images that celebrate the community and Hispanic artwork.
“Jones Soda is thrilled that fans from the Hispanic community have reached out to us, and we are very excited about our fun new flavors,” said Joth Ricci, COO of Jones Soda. “Jones Soda’s ability to customize our labels allows us to participate in the celebration of this amazing community in a unique and special way.”
Jones Soda is known for their ability to make personal connections with consumers through their patented labeling system that enables them to select submitted photos from fans to showcase on bottles, as well as allows people to create customized bottles at http://www.myjones.com .
The specialty sodas will be available in the following new flavors: Naranja Mandarina, Limón, Tutti Frutti and Crema de Piña. It will debut in the single-serve sections of select retailers in Los Angeles, San Diego and Arizona.
For more information visit http://www.jonessoda.com .
About Jones Soda Co.:
Headquartered in Seattle, Washington, Jones Soda Co. markets and distributes premium beverages under the Jones Soda, Jones Pure Cane Soda, Jones 24C, Jones GABA, Jones Organics, Jones Naturals and Whoopass brands and sells through its distribution network in markets across North America. A leader in the premium soda category, Jones is known for its variety of flavors and innovative labeling technique that incorporates always-changing photos sent in from its consumers. For more information visit http://www.jonessoda.com and http://www.myjones.com .
Source: Richmond Public Relations

SEATTLE, Wash. – Jones Soda Co. is excited to introduce a new collection of Spanish labels and soda flavors honoring the culture and spirit of Hispanics living in America. This collection stems from numerous requests from Jones Soda fans, and features Spanish labels and images that celebrate the community and Hispanic artwork.

New Hispanic Jones Soda flavors

New Hispanic Jones Soda flavors

“Jones Soda is thrilled that fans from the Hispanic community have reached out to us, and we are very excited about our fun new flavors,” said Joth Ricci, COO of Jones Soda. “Jones Soda’s ability to customize our labels allows us to participate in the celebration of this amazing community in a unique and special way.”

Jones Soda is known for their ability to make personal connections with consumers through their patented labeling system that enables them to select submitted photos from fans to showcase on bottles, as well as allows people to create customized bottles at http://www.myjones.com .

The specialty sodas will be available in the following new flavors: Naranja Mandarina, Limón, Tutti Frutti and Crema de Piña. It will debut in the single-serve sections of select retailers in Los Angeles, San Diego and Arizona.

For more information visit http://www.jonessoda.com .

About Jones Soda Co.:

Headquartered in Seattle, Washington, Jones Soda Co. markets and distributes premium beverages under the Jones Soda, Jones Pure Cane Soda, Jones 24C, Jones GABA, Jones Organics, Jones Naturals and Whoopass brands and sells through its distribution network in markets across North America. A leader in the premium soda category, Jones is known for its variety of flavors and innovative labeling technique that incorporates always-changing photos sent in from its consumers. For more information visit http://www.jonessoda.com and http://www.myjones.com .

Meet the Colombians!!!
A little about Dominicans
be mindful when it comes to words

be mindful when it comes to words

Source: Richmond Public Relations

SABEResPODER & Best Buy Promote Informed Shopping Decisions

The initiative aims at educating the Latino community on how best to take advantage of the technology at their reach.

Best Buy unites with SABEResPODER to educate the Hispanic community about how to get the most out of the latest technology and understand their rights as consumers.

Various studies show that Latinos purchase more televisions, digital cameras, cell phones, and computers than the average population. However, Raul P. Lomeli-Azoubel, Executive Chairman for SABEResPODER, said that, “the statistics also reveal a different reality: the technological advances, that serve to make our lives easier, are not being used to their full potential.”

For this reason, SABEResPODER, with Best Buy’s support, has published an educational guide about “New Technologies” with the main objective of sharing vital information, so that consumers can learn more about their options.

The educational campaign also includes an informative video on the subject and workshops that will be offered to community groups. The goal of the initiative is to promote smarter, more informed, consumer electronic shopping, and help the community purchase products that actually meet their specific needs.

“Our knowledgeable, non-commission sales specialists are trained specifically to help our customers find the right product solution to best fit their individual needs,” says Marco Orozco from Best Buy. “We believe our sales specialists’ primary role is to listen to the needs of our customers and then inform and educate them on their product options.”

The initiative was presented during a community event at the Mexican Consulate in Los Angeles, where Consul General Juan Marcos Gutierrez congratulated SABEResPODER for this campaign focused on educating the community and empowering them to make informed purchasing decisions. The Consul General also made the following recommendation to the audience: “remember to first educate yourself on your options in order to avoid mistakes that are caused by impulse shopping.”

The recurring theme at the event was for consumers to make informed purchases to ensure that technology delivers on its promises; and to learn how technology can improve the quality of life in a digital world.

About SABEResPODER, Inc.

SABEResPODER provides corporations, agencies and non-profit entities with powerful and exclusive educational media solutions for gaining incremental customers while assisting Spanish-dominant consumers to become more informed, confident and active consumers and participants in American society. SABEResPODER is a targeted Spanish-language multimedia network reaching Spanish dominant consumers at a key transition point when they are actively pursuing resources to further establish their lives in the United States. For more information about SABEResPODER, visit www.saberespoder.com.

About Best Buy Co., Inc.

With operations in the United States, Canada, Europe, China and Mexico, Best Buy is a multinational retailer of technology and entertainment products and services with a commitment to growth and innovation. Approximately 155,000 employees apply their talents to help bring the benefits of these brands to life for customers through retail locations, multiple call centers and Web sites, in-home solutions, product delivery and activities in our communities. Community partnership is central to the way we do business at Best Buy. In fiscal 2009, Best Buy donated a combined $33.4 million to improve the vitality of the communities where their employees and customers live and work. For more information about Best Buy, visit www.bestbuy.com


SOURCE SABEResPODER

Managers’ Hiring Practices Vary By Race & Ethnicity

Managers' Hiring Practices Vary By Race, Ethnicity Says University of Miami Study

Managers’ Hiring Practices Vary By Race, Ethnicity Says University of Miami Study

Managers’ Hiring Practices Vary By Race, Ethnicity Says University of Miami Study

White, Asian and Hispanic managers tend to hire more whites and fewer blacks than black managers do, according to a new study out of the University of Miami School of Business Administration.

Using more than two years of personnel data from a large U.S. retail chain, the study found that when a black manager in a typical store is replaced by a white, Asian or Hispanic manager, the share of newly hired blacks falls from 21 to 17 percent, and the share of whites hired rises from 60 to 64 percent. The effect is even stronger for stores located in the South, where the replacement of a black manager causes the share of newly hired blacks to fall from 29 to 21 percent. In locations with large Hispanic populations, Hispanics hire more Hispanics and fewer whites than white managers. The study is out this month in the Journal of Labor Economics.

The finding is clear evidence that the race or ethnicity of those who make hiring decisions can have a strong impact in the racial makeup of a company’s workforce, says Laura Giuliano, an assistant professor of economics at the University of Miami School of Business, who authored the study with David Levine and Jonathan Leonard from the University of California, Berkeley.

How strong is the impact? Consider a typical store with 40 employees located in the Southern U.S. According to the data, replacing a black manager with a non-black manager would result in the replacement of three to four black workers with white workers over the course of one year.

The effect in a non-Southern store would also be significant, if a bit more subtle. Replacing a black manager in a non-Southern store would result in one black worker being replaced by a white worker over a year.

“From the viewpoint of a district manager who is observing just a small sample of stores, this change might go unnoticed or appear insignificant,” Giuliano said. “However, the change may appear more significant from the point of view of job seekers — and especially black job seekers. In fact, the change in non-Southern stores amounts to a proportional decline of 15 percent in the number of blacks employed.”

The data used by Giuliano and her colleagues were especially well suited to sorting out the role race plays in hiring. While previous studies have also suggested that manager race plays a role, those studies have been unable to distinguish that role from other factors such as the demographic makeup of the local labor pool. Giuliano and her colleagues were able to isolate the race factor by tracking individual stores that experienced a change of manager.

“This means we can compare the hiring patterns of consecutive managers of different races in the same store,” she said. “Hence we can isolate the effect of a manager’s race by comparing the hiring patterns of managers when they hire from similar labor pools under similar conditions.”

The researchers were also able to use their data to offer some partial explanations for why these differences in hiring patterns exist.

They found that both black and non-black managers tend to hire people who live close to them. So if black managers live in predominantly black neighborhoods, their hiring network is also likely to be predominantly black.

The research also suggests that black managers hire fewer whites because whites may be less willing to work for black managers. The study found that when a white manager is replaced with a black manager, the rate at which white workers quit their jobs increases by 15 percent.

“We interpret this increase in the white quit rate as evidence of discriminatory sorting by white job seekers,” the authors write. “It implies that whites who dislike working for black managers often avoid working for black managers in the first place.”

About the University of Miami School of Business Administration

The University of Miami School of Business Administration is a comprehensive business school, offering undergraduate business, full-time MBA, Executive MBA, MS, PhD and non-degree executive education programs. One of 12 colleges and schools at the University of Miami, the School is located in a major hub of international trade and commerce and acclaimed for the global orientation and diversity of its faculty, students and curriculum. The School delivers its programs at its main campus in Coral Gables as well as at locations across Florida and abroad. More information about the University of Miami School of Business can be found at www.bus.miami.edu.

NOTE TO EDITORS: A full copy of the study is available upon request. The University of Miami has a television studio on campus and can provide live expert interviews via satellite or Vyvx fiber.

    Media Contact:
    Tracy Simon
    University of Miami School of Business Administration
    267-679-2774
    tsimon@sba.umiami.edu

SOURCE University of Miami School of Business Administration

Automotive Website Targets Hispanic Car Buyers and Sellers

AutosAhora.com helps Hispanic consumers and dealerships targeting Hispanics to list their cars for sale.

Automotive Website Targets Hispanic Car Buyers and Sellers

Automotive Website Targets Hispanic Car Buyers and Sellers

AutosAhora.com, the one-stop online resource for Hispanic new and used car buyers now offers consumers and dealerships the ability to sell their cars online. Consumers can list their cars for sale on the site for free for thirty days, and dealerships can upload extensive inventory for a low monthly fee. AutosAhora.com allows consumers and dealerships alike, to manage their offers and listings with a simple interface and allows dealerships to personalize their ads to reinforce their brand image at the local and national level.

Automotive Website Targets Hispanic Car Buyers and Sellers

AutosAhora.com is one of the few comprehensive online resources that allows Hispanics to shop for a car, sell a car and obtain financing entirely in English and Spanish. AutosAhora.com also features articles on the new government sponsored “Cash for Clunkers” program and calculators that help consumers understand how much they can afford.

Source: AutosAhora.com

Hispanic Heritage Month: Sept. 15 – Oct. 15

Origin of the Hispanic Heritage Month

In September 1968, Congress authorized President Lyndon B. Johnson to proclaim National Hispanic Heritage Week, which was observed during the week that included Sept. 15 and Sept. 16. The observance was expanded in 1988 to a month long celebration (Sept. 15 – Oct. 15). America celebrates the culture and traditions of those who trace their roots to Spain, Mexico and the Spanish-speaking nations of Central America, South America and the Caribbean. Sept. 15 was chosen as the starting point for the celebration because it is the anniversary of independence of five Latin American countries: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. In addition, Mexico and Chile celebrate their independence days on Sept. 16 and Sept. 18, respectively.

Population

46.9 million

The estimated Hispanic population of the United States as of July 1, 2008, making people of Hispanic origin the nation’s largest ethnic or race minority. Hispanics constituted 15 percent of the nation’s total population. In addition, there are approximately 4 million residents of Puerto Rico.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html and http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013049.html

More than 1

…of every two people added to the nation’s population between July 1, 2007, and July 1, 2008, was Hispanic. There were 1.5 million Hispanics added to the population during the period.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html

3.2%

Percentage increase in the Hispanic population between July 1, 2007, and July 1, 2008, making Hispanics the fastest-growing minority group.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html

132.8 million

The projected Hispanic population of the United States on July 1, 2050. According to this projection, Hispanics will constitute 30 percent of the nation’s population by that date.

Source: Population projections http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/012496.html

22.4 million

The nation’s Hispanic population during the 1990 Census — less than half the current total.

Source: The Hispanic Population: 2000 http://www.census.gov/prod/2001pubs/c2kbr01-3.pdf

2nd

Ranking of the size of the U.S. Hispanic population worldwide, as of 2008. Only Mexico (110 million) had a larger Hispanic population than the United States (46.9 million).

Source: International Data Base http://www.census.gov/ipc/nas/content/live/hispanic/idbsum.html and population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html

64%

The percentage of Hispanic-origin people in the United States who were of Mexican background in 2007. Another 9 percent were of Puerto Rican background, with 3.5 percent Cuban, 3.1 percent Salvadoran and 2.7 percent Dominican. The remainder were of some other Central American, South American or other Hispanic or Latino origin.

Source: 2007 American Community Surveyhttp://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

About 45 percent of the nation’s Dominicans lived in New York City in 2007 and about half of the nation’s Cubans in Miami-Dade County, Fla.

Source: 2007 American Community Survey http://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

25%

Percentage of children younger than 5 who were Hispanic in 2008. All in all, Hispanics comprised 22 percent of children younger than 18.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html

27.7 years

Median age of the Hispanic population in 2008. This compared with 36.8 years for the population as a whole.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html

107

Number of Hispanic males in 2008 per every 100 Hispanic females. This was in sharp contrast to the overall population, which had 97 males per every 100 females.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013733.html

States and Counties

48%

The percentage of the Hispanic-origin population that lived in California or Texas in 2008. California was home to 13.5 million Hispanics, and Texas was home to 8.9 million.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

16

The number of states with at least a half-million Hispanic residents — Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Massachusetts, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia and Washington.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

45%

The percentage of New Mexico’s population that was Hispanic in 2008, the highest of any state. Hispanics also made up at least one fifth of the population in California and Texas, at 37 percent each, Arizona (30 percent), Nevada (26 percent), Florida (21 percent) and Colorado (20 percent). New Mexico had 891,000 Hispanics.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

The Carolinas

The states with the highest percentage increases in Hispanic population between July 1, 2007, and July 1, 2008. South Carolina’s increase was 7.7 percent and North Carolina’s was 7.4 percent.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

4.7 million

The Hispanic population of Los Angeles County, Calif., in 2008 — the largest of any county in the nation. Los Angeles County also had the biggest numerical increase in the Hispanic population (67,000) since July 2007.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

97%

Proportion of the population of Starr County, Texas, that was Hispanic as of 2008, which led the nation. All of the top 10 counties in this category were in Texas.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

48

Number of the nation’s 3,142 counties that are majority-Hispanic.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

15%

Percent increase in the Hispanic population in Luzerne County, Pa., from July 1, 2007, to July 1, 2008. Among all counties with 2007 Hispanic populations of at least 10,000, Luzerne topped the nation in this category. Luzerne’s county seat is Wilkes-Barre.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

313,000

The increase in California’s Hispanic population between July 1, 2007, and July 1, 2008, which led all states. Texas (305,000) and Florida (111,000) also recorded large increases.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

20

Number of states in which Hispanics are the largest minority group. These states are Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Massachusetts, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, Texas, Utah, Washington and Wyoming.

Source: Population estimates http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/population/013734.html

Businesses

Source for statements in this section: Hispanic-owned Firms: 2002http://www.census.gov/csd/sbo/hispanic2002.htm

1.6 million

The number of Hispanic-owned businesses in 2002.

Nearly 43 percent of Hispanic-owned firms operated in construction; administrative and support, and waste management and remediation services; and other services, such as personal services, and repair and maintenance. Retail and wholesale trade accounted for nearly 36 percent of Hispanic-owned business revenue.

Counties with the highest number of Hispanic-owned firms were Los Angeles County (188,422); Miami-Dade County (163,187); and Harris County, Texas (61,934).

Triple

The rate of growth of Hispanic-owned businesses between 1997 and 2002 (31 percent) compared with the national average (10 percent) for all businesses.

$222 billion

Revenue generated by Hispanic-owned businesses in 2002, up 19 percent from 1997.

44.6%

…of all Hispanic-owned firms were owned by people of Mexican origin (Mexican, Mexican-American or Chicano).

29,168

Number of Hispanic-owned firms with receipts of $1 million or more.

Families and Children

10.4 million

The number of Hispanic family households in the United States in 2008. Of these households, 62 percent included children younger than 18.

Source: Families and Living Arrangements http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/families_households/013378.html

66%

The percentage of Hispanic family households consisting of a married couple.

Source: Families and Living Arrangements http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/families_households/013378.html

43%

The percentage of Hispanic family households consisting of a married couple with children younger than 18.

Source: Families and Living Arrangements http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/families_households/013378.html

70%

Percentage of Hispanic children living with two parents.

Source: Families and Living Arrangements http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/families_households/013378.html

Spanish Language

35 million

The number of U.S. residents 5 and older who spoke Spanish at home in 2007. Those who hablan espanol constituted 12 percent of U.S. residents. More than half of these Spanish speakers spoke English “very well.”

Source: 2007 American Community Survey http://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

4

Number of states where at least one-in-five residents spoke Spanish at home in 2007 — Arizona, California, New Mexico and Texas.

Source: 2007 American Community Survey http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/american_community_survey_acs/012634.html

78%

Percentage of Hispanics 5 and older who spoke Spanish at home in 2007.

Source: 2007 American Community Surveyhttp://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

Income, Poverty and Health Insurance

$38,679

The median income of Hispanic households in 2007, statistically unchanged from the previous year after adjusting for inflation.

Source: Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2007 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/income_wealth/012528.html

21.5%

The poverty rate among Hispanics in 2007, up from 20.6 percent in 2006.

Source: Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2007 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/income_wealth/012528.html

32.1%

The percentage of Hispanics who lacked health insurance in 2007, down from 34.1 percent in 2006.

Source: Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2007 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/income_wealth/012528.html

Education

53%

The percentage of Hispanic 4-year-olds enrolled in nursery school in 2007, up from 43 percent in 1997 and 21 percent in 1987.

Source: School Enrollment – Social and Economic Characteristics of Students: October 2007http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013391.html

62%

The percentage of Hispanics 25 and older who had at least a high school education in 2008.

Source: Educational Attainment in the United States: 2008 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013618.html

13%

The percentage of the Hispanic population 25 and older with a bachelor’s degree or higher in 2008.

Source: Educational Attainment in the United States: 2008 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013618.html

3.6 million

The number of Hispanics 18 and older who had at least a bachelor’s degree in 2008.

Source: Educational Attainment in the United States: 2008 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013618.html

1 million

Number of Hispanics 25 and older with advanced degrees in 2008 (e.g., master’s, professional, doctorate).

Source: Educational Attainment in the United States: 2008 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013618.html

12%

Percentage of full-time college students (both undergraduate and graduate students) in October 2007 who were Hispanic, up from 10 percent in 2006.

Source: School Enrollment – Social and Economic Characteristics of Students: October 2007 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013391.html

20%

Percentage of elementary and high school students combined who were Hispanic.

Source: School Enrollment – Social and Economic Characteristics of Students: October 2007 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/education/013391.html

Names

4

The number of Hispanic surnames ranked among the 15 most common in 2000. It was the first time that a Hispanic surname reached the top 15 during a census. Garcia was the most frequent Hispanic surname, occurring 858,289 times and placing eighth on the list — up from 18th in 1990. Rodriguez (ninth), Martinez (11th) and Hernandez (15th) were the next most common Hispanic surnames.

Source: Census 2000 Genealogy http://www.census.gov/genealogy/nas/content/live/hispanic/freqnames2k.html

Jobs

67%

Percentage of Hispanics 16 and older who were in the civilian labor force in 2007.

Source: 2007 American Community Survey http://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

18%

The percentage of Hispanics 16 or older who worked in management, professional and related occupations in 2007. The same percentage worked in production, transportation and material moving occupations. Another 16 percent worked in construction, extraction, maintenance and repair occupations. Approximately 24 percent of Hispanics 16 or older worked in service occupations; 21 percent in sales and office occupations; and 2 percent in farming, fishing and forestry occupations.

Source: 2007 American Community Survey http://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

79,400

Number of Hispanic chief executives. In addition, 50,866 physicians and surgeons; 48,720 postsecondary teachers; 38,532 lawyers; and 2,726 news analysts, reporters and correspondents are Hispanic.

Source: Upcoming Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2010, Table 603 http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/

Voting

5.6 million

The number of Hispanic citizens who reported voting in the 2006 congressional elections. The percentage of Hispanic citizens voting — about 32 percent — did not change statistically from four years earlier.

Source: Voting and Registration in the Election of November 2006 http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/nas/content/live/hispanic/releases/archives/voting/012234.html

Serving our Country

1.1 million

The number of Hispanic veterans of the U.S. armed forces.

Source: 2007 American Community Survey http://www.census.gov/acs/nas/content/live/hispanic/Products/users_guide/index.htm

Following is a list of observances typically covered by the Census Bureau’s Facts for Features series:

    African-American History Month (February)    Labor Day
    Super Bowl                                   Grandparents Day
    Valentine's Day (Feb. 14)                    Hispanic Heritage Month
    Women's History Month (March)                 (Sept. 15-Oct. 15)
    Irish-American Heritage Month (March)/       Unmarried and Single
     St. Patrick's Day (March 17)                 Americans Week
    Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month (May)  Halloween (Oct. 31)
    Older Americans Month (May)                  American Indian/Alaska
    Cinco de Mayo (May 5)                         Native Heritage Month
    Mother's Day                                  (November)
    Father's Day                                 Veterans Day (Nov. 11)
    The Fourth of July (July 4)                  Thanksgiving Day
    Anniversary of Americans with                The Holiday Season
     Disabilities Act (July 26)                   (December)
    Back to School (August)

Editor’s note: The preceding data were collected from a variety of sources and may be subject to sampling variability and other sources of error. Facts for Features are customarily released about two months before an observance in order to accommodate magazine production timelines. Questions or comments should be directed to the Census Bureau’s Public Information Office: telephone: 301-763-3030; fax: 301-763-3762; or e-mail: pio@census.gov.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

LG Electronics Reorganizes Manufacturing Facilities in Mexico

LG Electronics Reorganizes Manufacturing Facilities, Increases Investment in Mexico

MEXICO CITY, July 6 /PRNewswire/ — LG Electronics is planning to reorganize manufacturing plants and expand investments in Mexico to maximize efficiency and competitiveness.

LG Electronics in Mexico

LG Electronics in Mexico

The company will invest an additional US$100 million over the next three years, increasing total production capacity to US$4 billion. This is designed to generate synergies among plants in Mexico and improve cash flow during the current global recession, while further improving capabilities to serve customers in North, Central and South America.

LG Electronics currently operates three manufacturing facilities in Mexico: Reynosa and Mexicali producing TVs and Monterrey making refrigerators and electric ovens. The reorganization program, which is now under way, includes:

  • Consolidation of LCD TV manufacturing plants — Two separate plants in Reynosa and Mexicali will be integrated into one consolidated plant in Reynosa to produce mid-large size and premium TVs. Consolidation is expected to be completed by September 2009.
  • Outsourcing of small- and medium-size LCD TVs — LG Electronics plans to expand its collaboration with an external manufacturing partner in Mexico.
  • Withdrawal from mobile phone manufacturing in Mexicali — With the closure of the Mexicali plant in June, handsets for North America will be produced in Korea and China.
  • Expansion of Monterrey plant capabilities — The refrigerator and electric oven manufacturing Monterrey plant will start producing gas ovens by the end of 2009.
  • Localization of components — LG Electronics will source more components in Mexico to gain cost competitiveness

Planned increases in investment and employment include:

  • Increased investment — LG Electronics plans to invest more than US$100 million in Mexico over the next three years.
  • Expanded production capacity — LG will expand production capacity to US$4 billion by 2012, up from US$2.6 billion in 2008.
  • Additional employment — Adding new production lines in Reynosa will generate about 1,200 new jobs and theMonterrey plant is planning to hire 1,300 additional workers. Localizing component production will help boost recruitment opportunities in Mexico.
  • Retirement benefits and outplacement support — All 500 Mexicali employees will be eligible for positions inReynosa or Monterrey. Retiring employees will receive pensions or outplacement support services consistent with local labor laws.

About LG Electronics, Inc.

LG Electronics, Inc. (KSE: 066570.KS) is a global leader and technology innovator in consumer electronics, mobile communications and home appliances, employing more than 84,000 people working in 115 operations including 84 subsidiaries around the world. With 2008 global sales of $44.7 billion, LG comprises of five business units – Home Entertainment, Mobile Communications, Home Appliance, Air Conditioning and Business Solutions. LG is one of the world’s leading producers of flat panel TVs, audio and video products, mobile handsets, air conditioners and washing machines. LG has signed a long-term agreement to become both A Global Partner of Formula 1(TM) and A Technology Partner of Formula 1(TM). As part of this top-level association, LG acquires exclusive designations and marketing rights as the official consumer electronics, mobile phone and data processor of this global sporting event. For more information, please visit www.lge.com.

Source:LGE

Hispanic Business Magazine Announces 500 Largest U.S. Hispanic-owned Companies

SANTA BARBARA, Calif., June 29 /PRNewswire/ — The June 2009 issue of Hispanic Business magazine features the 27th annual Hispanic Business 500, the benchmark directory of the 500 largest Hispanic-owned companies in the United States.
The annual Hispanic Business 500 directory is widely recognized as the barometer of the U.S. Hispanic economy. Cumulative revenues for the directory totaled $36.15 billion, a slight increase from 2008, which totaled $36.10 billion. A searchable directory of the 2009 Hispanic Business 500 is available now on the magazine’s companion web site, HispanicBusiness.com.
For the third straight year, the HB 500’s top-ranked company was the aptly named Brightstar, a global telecom wholesaler. Though the company posted a dip in revenue of 2.35 percent, it still managed to bring in $3.6 billion.
The surprising bright spot of this year’s list was the financial sector, which posted an impressive 17.2 percent boost in revenues. Pan-American Life Insurance Co. of New Orleans was among the successful businesses in this category, showing an 11 percent gain in revenue over the previous year, as well as a healthy 6 percent profit.
Companies included in the 500 must show at least 51 percent ownership by Hispanic U.S. citizens and must maintain headquarters in one of the 50 states or Washington, D.C. Principals must be U.S. citizens.
For more information, go to http://www.hispanicbusiness.com/rankings/hispanic_companies/
About Hispanic Business Media
For 30 years Hispanic Business Media has been the authoritative source for the latest trends, research and reporting on the growth of the U.S. Hispanic consumer market and the Hispanic enterprise and professional sectors.
Hispanic Business Media properties provide innovative branding and targeted marketing solutions across multiple platforms:
— Award-winning print editorial via Hispanic Business Magazine, which provides readers in the United States and around the world with the most relevant and data-driven news on the U.S. Hispanic economy. — Fresh, real-time online content and interaction via HispanicBusiness.com. The site specializes in b2b daily news, branded content from Hispanic Business magazine, original postings by hb.com writers and some user-generated content. — Hispanic Business Events, which feature and draw the nation’s most affluent and influential Hispanic leaders. Examples include the Hispanic Business magazine EOY Awards for entrepreneurial excellence; the CEO Capital Markets Roundtable; and the Woman of the Year (WOY) Awards. — Unique data reports on the U.S. Hispanic sector developed by HispanTelligence, the research arm of Hispanic Business Media. — Diversity recruiting and development services from HireDiversity.com.
HispanicBusiness magazine, HispanicBusiness.com, Hispanic Business magazine EOY, HireDiversity.com and HispanTelligence are registered trademarks of Hispanic Business Inc. 2008 Hispanic Business Inc. All rights reserved. Hispanic Business Media
Web Site: http://www.hispanicbusiness.com/
Source: PR Newswire

SANTA BARBARA, Calif., June 29 /PRNewswire/ — The June 2009 issue of Hispanic Business magazine features the 27th annual Hispanic Business 500, the benchmark directory of the 500 largest Hispanic-owned companies in the United States.

The annual Hispanic Business 500 directory is widely recognized as the barometer of the U.S. Hispanic economy. Cumulative revenues for the directory totaled $36.15 billion, a slight increase from 2008, which totaled $36.10 billion. A searchable directory of the 2009 Hispanic Business 500 is available now on the magazine’s companion web site, HispanicBusiness.com.

For the third straight year, the HB 500’s top-ranked company was the aptly named Brightstar, a global telecom wholesaler. Though the company posted a dip in revenue of 2.35 percent, it still managed to bring in $3.6 billion.

The surprising bright spot of this year’s list was the financial sector, which posted an impressive 17.2 percent boost in revenues. Pan-American Life Insurance Co. of New Orleans was among the successful businesses in this category, showing an 11 percent gain in revenue over the previous year, as well as a healthy 6 percent profit.

Companies included in the 500 must show at least 51 percent ownership by Hispanic U.S. citizens and must maintain headquarters in one of the 50 states or Washington, D.C. Principals must be U.S. citizens.

For more information, go to http://www.hispanicbusiness.com/rankings/hispanic_companies/

About Hispanic Business Media
For 30 years Hispanic Business Media has been the authoritative source for the latest trends, research and reporting on the growth of the U.S. Hispanic consumer market and the Hispanic enterprise and professional sectors.
Hispanic Business Media properties provide innovative branding and targeted marketing solutions across multiple platforms:
— Award-winning print editorial via Hispanic Business Magazine, which provides readers in the United States and around the world with the most relevant and data-driven news on the U.S. Hispanic economy. — Fresh, real-time online content and interaction via HispanicBusiness.com. The site specializes in b2b daily news, branded content from Hispanic Business magazine, original postings by hb.com writers and some user-generated content. — Hispanic Business Events, which feature and draw the nation’s most affluent and influential Hispanic leaders. Examples include the Hispanic Business magazine EOY Awards for entrepreneurial excellence; the CEO Capital Markets Roundtable; and the Woman of the Year (WOY) Awards. — Unique data reports on the U.S. Hispanic sector developed by HispanTelligence, the research arm of Hispanic Business Media. — Diversity recruiting and development services from HireDiversity.com.
HispanicBusiness magazine, HispanicBusiness.com, Hispanic Business magazine EOY, HireDiversity.com and HispanTelligence are registered trademarks of Hispanic Business Inc. 2008 Hispanic Business Inc. All rights reserved. Hispanic Business Media
Web Site: http://www.hispanicbusiness.com/
Source: PR Newswire

Salsarita’s Fresh Cantina Strong Growth in First Half of 2009

Rapidly Growing Fresh-Mex Franchise Opens Four New Restaurants; Signs Agreements for 28 New Locations with Goal of 200 Restaurants by 2012

Salsarita's Fresh Cantina, one of the nation's fastest growing, fast-casual Mexican restaurant chains

Salsarita’s Fresh Cantina, one of the nation’s fastest growing, fast-casual Mexican restaurant chains

CHARLOTTE, N.C., June 22 /PRNewswire/ –Salsarita’s Fresh Cantina, one of the nation’s fastest growing, fast-casual Mexican restaurant chains has experienced great success in 2009 with the opening of four new restaurants and signed agreements for 28 more locations in the U.S. and Puerto Rico. The company is currently closing in on its first hundred restaurants with the goal of opening 200 restaurants by 2012.

With new locations opening across the country, the company is quickly gaining brand recognition and a reputation for quality and legendary hospitality. Despite the economic downturn, Salsarita’s has announced that Minneapolis,Jacksonville, Detroit, Raleigh-Durham, Birmingham, Nashville, Upstate New York and Baltimore will be key markets for its 2009 expansion plans.

“We are very excited about the progress we’ve made in the first half of 2009 and are looking to expand our high-quality, Fresh-Mexican concept to new and existing markets across the country,” said Paul Mangiamele, president and CEO, Salsarita’s Fresh Cantina. “With successful penetration in select southern and northeastern markets, Salsarita’s is setting its sights on building a nationally competitive franchise brand.”

Most recently, Salsarita’s opened two restaurants in Charlotte, NC and single units in Murfreesboro and Knoxville, TN.A 20 unit store development agreement was signed in the Upstate New York region and agreements with franchisees have been signed in Clarence, NY, Overland Park, KS, Greenville, NC and Puerto Rico.

Salsarita’s is currently looking for qualified candidates with food service, operations or real estate experience to join its team as area representatives, area developers or single-unit franchisees. The estimated initial investment is between$296,700 and $577,100 depending on the real estate selection ranging from 2,200 to 2,700 square-feet, which is inclusive of the $25,000 franchise fee. The company’s comprehensive training and support program includes a three-week Burrito Boot Camp at the corporate headquarters, pre- and post-grand opening on-site support and ongoing business coaching.

“With more customers visiting fast-casual concepts instead of traditional full-service, sit-down restaurants, Salsarita’s is well positioned to succeed during this time of economic uncertainty,” said Mangiamele. “Fresh-Mexican is an up and coming concept and Salsarita’s fills this growing niche in the franchise industry.”

Salsarita’s specializes in serving made-to-order burritos, tacos, tortilla, pizza’s and taco salads. Prepared fresh-daily in each restaurant, guests can enjoy high-quality dishes featuring ground beef, grilled chicken, grilled steak, or pork, grilled shrimp and fresh vegetables. Salsarita’s also offers a choice of 13 delicious fillings and four homemade salsas. Every order is prepared in full view of customers in a 700-square-foot display kitchen with a contemporary Hispanic motif.

Source: Salsarita’s Fresh Cantina

More Grocery Chains Say Bienvenidos to the Hispanic Market

Arroz con leche. Comfort food Latin style. #youeatwithyoureyesfirst

Arroz con leche. Comfort food Latin style. #youeatwithyoureyesfirst

With the popularity of cooking Mexican cuisine at home on the rise, and the fast-growing Hispanic-American population, it’s no surprise that retailers, specifically grocers, are paying more attention to the Hispanic markets. More and more stores are bringing the Hispanic foods out of the ethnic aisle and into the mainstream sections of the stores.

Supermarket chains, like Publix, now offer Mexican spices among the parsley and thyme, and queso fresco and chorizo can be found next to the Parmigiano-Regianno and Roquefort in the refrigerator cases. National chain Walmart is also aiming to appeal to Hispanic shoppers with two test Supermercados debuting in Houston and Phoenix. Likewise, Sam’s Club is opening a Hispanic-oriented store called Mas this Summer in Houston.
Although the recession might not be a good time to develop new cultural marketing strategies, according to a report by the Food Marketing Institute, Hispanic consumers shop for groceries more often than the average American. They also cook from scratch more and purchase more fresh ingredients. Since I’m a huge fan of embracing all types of cuisine, I’m happy to hear that Mexican food items will be easier to find. How do you feel about the news?

With the popularity of cooking Mexican cuisine at home on the rise, and the fast-growing Hispanic-American population, it’s no surprise that retailers, specifically grocery chains, are paying more attention to the Hispanic markets. More and more stores are bringing the Hispanic foods out of the ethnic aisle and into the mainstream sections of the stores.

Supermarket and grocery chains, like Publix, now offer Mexican spices among the parsley and thyme, and queso fresco and chorizo can be found next to the Parmigiano-Regianno and Roquefort in the refrigerator cases. National chain Walmart is also aiming to appeal to Hispanic shoppers with two test Supermercados debuting in Houston and Phoenix. Likewise, Sam’s Club is opening a Hispanic-oriented store called Mas this Summer in Houston.

According to a report by the Food Marketing Institute, Hispanic consumers shop for groceries more often than the average American. They also cook from scratch more and purchase more fresh ingredients. Since I’m a huge fan of embracing all types of cuisine, I’m happy to hear that Mexican food items will be easier to find. How do you feel about the news?

Source: Partysugar – More Grocery Chains Say Bienvenidos to the Hispanic Market
Arroz con leche. Comfort food Latin style. #youeatwithyoureyesfirst

Arroz con leche. Comfort food Latin style. #youeatwithyoureyesfirst

Jones Soda Co. celebrates Hispanic heritage with new flavors

SEATTLE, Wash. – Jones Soda Co. is excited to introduce a new collection of Spanish labels and soda flavors honoring the culture and spirit of Hispanics living in America. This collection stems from numerous requests from Jones Soda fans, and features Spanish labels and images that celebrate the community and Hispanic artwork.
“Jones Soda is thrilled that fans from the Hispanic community have reached out to us, and we are very excited about our fun new flavors,” said Joth Ricci, COO of Jones Soda. “Jones Soda’s ability to customize our labels allows us to participate in the celebration of this amazing community in a unique and special way.”
Jones Soda is known for their ability to make personal connections with consumers through their patented labeling system that enables them to select submitted photos from fans to showcase on bottles, as well as allows people to create customized bottles at http://www.myjones.com .
The specialty sodas will be available in the following new flavors: Naranja Mandarina, Limón, Tutti Frutti and Crema de Piña. It will debut in the single-serve sections of select retailers in Los Angeles, San Diego and Arizona.
For more information visit http://www.jonessoda.com .
About Jones Soda Co.:
Headquartered in Seattle, Washington, Jones Soda Co. markets and distributes premium beverages under the Jones Soda, Jones Pure Cane Soda, Jones 24C, Jones GABA, Jones Organics, Jones Naturals and Whoopass brands and sells through its distribution network in markets across North America. A leader in the premium soda category, Jones is known for its variety of flavors and innovative labeling technique that incorporates always-changing photos sent in from its consumers. For more information visit http://www.jonessoda.com and http://www.myjones.com .
Source: Richmond Public Relations

SEATTLE, Wash. – Jones Soda Co. is excited to introduce a new collection of Spanish labels and soda flavors honoring the culture and spirit of Hispanics living in America. This collection stems from numerous requests from Jones Soda fans, and features Spanish labels and images that celebrate the community and Hispanic artwork.

New Hispanic Jones Soda flavors

New Hispanic Jones Soda flavors

“Jones Soda is thrilled that fans from the Hispanic community have reached out to us, and we are very excited about our fun new flavors,” said Joth Ricci, COO of Jones Soda. “Jones Soda’s ability to customize our labels allows us to participate in the celebration of this amazing community in a unique and special way.”

Jones Soda is known for their ability to make personal connections with consumers through their patented labeling system that enables them to select submitted photos from fans to showcase on bottles, as well as allows people to create customized bottles at http://www.myjones.com .

The specialty sodas will be available in the following new flavors: Naranja Mandarina, Limón, Tutti Frutti and Crema de Piña. It will debut in the single-serve sections of select retailers in Los Angeles, San Diego and Arizona.

For more information visit http://www.jonessoda.com .

About Jones Soda Co.:

Headquartered in Seattle, Washington, Jones Soda Co. markets and distributes premium beverages under the Jones Soda, Jones Pure Cane Soda, Jones 24C, Jones GABA, Jones Organics, Jones Naturals and Whoopass brands and sells through its distribution network in markets across North America. A leader in the premium soda category, Jones is known for its variety of flavors and innovative labeling technique that incorporates always-changing photos sent in from its consumers. For more information visit http://www.jonessoda.com and http://www.myjones.com .

Meet the Colombians!!!
A little about Dominicans
be mindful when it comes to words

be mindful when it comes to words

Source: Richmond Public Relations

The Recession As Hispanics See It

Very interesting article from Patricia Graham, Executive Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer of Knowledge Networks.

The Recession As Hispanics See It

by Patricia Graham, April 23, 2009, 11:30 AM
It is no secret that the struggling economy is affecting everyone in one way or another. But how, specifically, are Hispanics viewing and weathering the downturn? Data sources abound about the general population — polls from various sources that may or may not be statistically representative of that or any group. But those who need to make marketing and business decisions taking into account Hispanics and the economy need something more substantial.
New data from a representative cross-section of all Americans — including Hispanics — is providing just that, along with some surprising insights, with greater reliability, on the recession as Hispanics see it.
Knowledge Networks asked 28,754 people (ages 18 and above) — including 2,511 Hispanics — on our nationally representative KnowledgePanel® the following question: “Do you consider the state of the economy to be better, worse, or about the same relative to one year ago?” In the general population, 88% said “worse,” and 10% said it’s about the same, with no differences appearing by ethnicity — indicating a common view: “It’s worse.” It seems that we see ourselves as sharing the same boat.
The future: Optimism versus pessimism
When it comes to optimism about the future, however, clear ethnic and racial differences do emerge. Hispanics and African Americans are envisioning the health of our economy one year from now very differently from Caucasians.
In their survey responses, Hispanics were less likely than the general population or African Americans to say that the economy would get worse — 29% for Hispanics, versus 37% for African Americans and 34% for Caucasians. In fact, 38% of Hispanics think there will be no change in the economy one year from now, a stasis view that African Americans do not share (29%).
What behaviors would they change?
Nationally, attempts abound to predict how people will behave in the marketplace, given differences in economic psychology among different ethnic and racial groups. In short, what might people change if the economy gets worse … or if it gets better?
Let’s look at what Hispanics and other groups said they would do, as a consequence of the economy getting worse. Almost everyone who self-evoked the “worse” scenario will change how much they spend. Yet, there are differences in predicted saving and investments by ethnicity. Hispanics (42%) and African Americans (44%) are less likely than Caucasians (49%) to change how much they save. They also are less likely to change how much they invest; 24% of Hispanics said their investment level would change, versus 30% in the general population.
And if things got better . . . ?
With an improving economy, it seems there is reason to believe that spending will bounce back. When asked, “Which of the following do you think you might change as a result of the economy improving?” Forty-one percent of the general population said they would change how much they spent; a drop of thirty-seven points relative to their spending behavior ‘if the economy was worse.’ So average people in the U.S. will be much less likely to reconsider their spending habits if the economy improves.
However, we again have a difference in the self-predicted behavior of Hispanics (and African Americans) compared to Caucasians under the improved economic scenario. The difference between their “economy gets worse” and “economy gets better” spending predictions was smaller for Hispanics (30 point difference) and African Americans (26 points) than it was for Caucasians (37 points).
This supports the conclusion that Hispanics may be among the last to have their spending habits change drastically as the economy improves — because they predict a smaller change in their spending for a positive economy. Ongoing online survey research using a representative sample can illuminate whether this is indeed the case.
Thought of the Day
time is an illusion

time is an illusion