Posts

Latinas with Lactose Intolerance Go The Natural Way

A recent study by the LACTAID® Brand found that 77 percent of Latinas with lactose intolerance reduce or limit the amount of dairy in their diet. This is concerning given that the calcium and vitamin D found in milk and dairy products play an important role in living a healthy lifestyle. With the holiday season fast approaching, it is likely that many favorite dishes will include dairy. Luckily, there is a way to manage your lactose intolerance and make milk and dairy products a daily, dietary habit – particularly during the holiday season.

Here are some tips for creating a healthy, calcium-rich diet:

  • Include dark leafy greens such as kale and mustard, collard, broccoli and turnip greens or beans into your favorite, traditional dishes. These foods are not only good sources of calcium, but also low in fat.
  • To boost your calcium intake, use canned fish such as salmon, in festive salads or pastas.
  • The same nutrients found in “regular” dairy products are also found in lactose-free products. Try lactose-free LACTAID® Milk, which is real milk, and rich in calcium and vitamin D when preparing favorite holiday desserts such as Christmas Custard or Flan de Leche.

Visit www.lactaidenespanol.com to learn more about lactose intolerance, access recipes for traditional, holiday dishes and get more information about LACTAID® Milk and Dairy Products. Also, to access a recent webinar presentation about the topic featuring comedian and actress Angelica Vale as well as Sylvia, visit http://www.videonewswire.com/event.asp?id=61635.

About Sylvia:

Sylvia Melendez-Klinger is a registered dietitian and certified personal trainer as well as founder of Hispanic Food Communications, a culinary consulting company. Mrs. Klinger has an extensive public health nutrition background having conducted research at Northwestern University Medical School in Chicago and the University of California Irvine Medical Center and serving as supervising nutritionist for the Women, Infants and Children (WIC) supplemental feeding program. Mrs. Klinger is a member of the American Dietetic Association, Illinois Dietetic Association and Latino Hispanic Dietetic Association network group (LAHIDAN).

Breaking Through the Mammography Controversy

Individualized Decision Between Woman and Her Provider is the Best Choice for Screening

Breaking Through the Mammography Controversy

Breaking Through the Mammography Controversy

“The controversy around mammography emphasizes that the best decision on screening is made by a woman and her health care provider. Balancing a woman’s individual medical history, risks, and concern level about breast cancer is a decision at the individual level using guidelines as a guide and not as something fixed in concrete,” said Dr. Jane L. Delgado, President and CEO of the National Alliance for Hispanic Health, the nation’s leading Hispanic health advocacy group. “As a woman I want to make the decision about screening with my health care provider. Secretary Sebelius has offered assurance to the American people that she would work to ensure that such choice would not be limited by health insurance coverage policy.”

Dr. Delgado encouraged women to, “Talk to your health care provider about the risks of false positives that result from regular screening and radiation risks associated with screening and how to balance that with the benefits that mammography offers, particularly for women with higher risks for breast cancer.” According to Dr. Delgado, “The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has provided us with the best in available science, but the best decision will always be made by you and your health care provider. The Alliance is dedicated to ensuring that you will always have that choice.”

For women without access to a regular health care provider, the Alliance’s toll-free and bilingual Su Familia National Hispanic Family Health Helpline (1-866-SU-FAMILIA or 1-866-783-2645) is available to offer referral to low-cost and no-cost health services in a caller’s area. The service is available 9am to 6pm eastern standard time, Monday through Friday.

About the National Alliance for Hispanic Health

The National Alliance for Hispanic Health is the nation’s foremost science-based source of information and trusted advocate for the health of Hispanics in the United States. The Alliance represents thousands of Hispanic health providers across the nation providing services to more than 15 million each year, making a daily difference in the lives of Hispanic communities and families. For more information, call the Alliance’s Su Familia National Hispanic Family Health Helpline at 1-866-783-2645 or visit www.hispanichealth.org.

SOURCE National Alliance for Hispanic Health

Health Disparities Pose High Cost for American Economy

Researchers commissioned by the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies released a report Thursday, calculating the combined costs of health inequalities and premature death in the nation to be $1.24 trillion between 2003 and 2006. During that time, minorities spent nearly $230 billion in excess medical care costs. The Joint Center is a Washington, D.C.-based think tank that focuses on the concerns of African-Americans and communities of color.

“There is no question that reducing the health disparities can save incredible amounts of money — more importantly it can save lives,” said U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, adding that reducing health disparities is high on her administration’s agenda. “There’s no single explanation for the disparities outlined in today’s report. And there’s no single solution either. But we know that the two biggest contributors to these disparities are a lack of access to insurance and a lack of access to care.”

Health Disparities Pose High Cost for American Economy, Researchers Say

Health Disparities Pose High Cost for American Economy, Researchers Say

Researchers from Johns Hopkins University, George Washington University and the University of Maryland conducted the report.

“We divided the (study) sample into groups and then we asked which ethnic group has the best health status, sometimes it was Whites or some other group,” said Dr. Thomas LaVeist of Johns Hopkins University, one of three report authors, “We consider it to be a disparity if other groups weren’t doing as well in a category.”

Citizens of color are disproportionately burdened by disease yet have limited access to health services, resulting in excessive medical expenditures and lost potential productivity, said Dr. Brian Smedley, vice president and director of the Health Policy Institute at the Joint Center.

Of the total excess direct medical cost of health disparities, African-American expenditures accounted for more than 59 percent, while 35.7 percent and 5 percent are attributable to Hispanics and Asian-Americans respectively. Overall, minorities require more care to maintain their health and since more than half of the uninsured are people of color, the costs are higher for everything from emergency room visits to prescription drugs, according to the study.

Using government vitality and conservative medical cost statistics from the World Health Organization, researchers measured worker productivity, absenteeism and in case of death, forgone wages and lost tax revenue among other things to estimate how much the economy lost due to disparities. They then adjusted the results to the 2008 inflation rates.

Without primary care or other adequate health resources, minorities often defer treatment or forgo preventive care until it’s too late, experts say.

“We are using emergency rooms and services to try and access health care inefficiently and expensively—and often dangerously because people are sicker when they access those services,” Sebelius said.

African-Americans are more likely to die from conditions like heart disease, breast cancer, and strokes as compared with non-Hispanic White men. Hispanics are less likely to develop some diseases — like prostate cancer — but they die more often from them, according to statistics from the government’s Office of Minority Health.

LaVeist said chronic conditions are more prevalent in minority communities because of their location. Fewer supermarkets and healthy food options, as well as environmental hazards, are barriers to wellness.

“If I could suggest one thing that would have the greatest impact, it would be to offer high quality education to every child,” LaVeist said. “That would do more than anything we can do in the healthcare system.”

Drexel University’s Dr. Dennis Andrulis outlined areas where health reform proposals succeed and fail to address disparities. The expansion of Medicare eligibility standards will provide more affordable access while bills that eliminate bi-lingual and other language service programs will limit it.

“Accessibility, affordability and accountability, those are the three A’s of this discussion,” Clyburn said.

10.05% of Hispanic Americans consider themselves lactose intolerant
Breaking Through the Mammography Controversy
Health Disparities Pose High Cost for American Economy, Researchers Say
Kids with Cancer
Hispanic Children In U.S. At Greater Risk For Obesity Than Other Ethnic/Racial Groups

Source: Arelis Hernandez

Latinas with Lactose Intolerance Go The Natural Way

A recent study by the LACTAID® Brand found that 77 percent of Latinas with lactose intolerance reduce or limit the amount of dairy in their diet. This is concerning given that the calcium and vitamin D found in milk and dairy products play an important role in living a healthy lifestyle. With the holiday season fast approaching, it is likely that many favorite dishes will include dairy. Luckily, there is a way to manage your lactose intolerance and make milk and dairy products a daily, dietary habit – particularly during the holiday season.

Here are some tips for creating a healthy, calcium-rich diet:

  • Include dark leafy greens such as kale and mustard, collard, broccoli and turnip greens or beans into your favorite, traditional dishes. These foods are not only good sources of calcium, but also low in fat.
  • To boost your calcium intake, use canned fish such as salmon, in festive salads or pastas.
  • The same nutrients found in “regular” dairy products are also found in lactose-free products. Try lactose-free LACTAID® Milk, which is real milk, and rich in calcium and vitamin D when preparing favorite holiday desserts such as Christmas Custard or Flan de Leche.

Visit www.lactaidenespanol.com to learn more about lactose intolerance, access recipes for traditional, holiday dishes and get more information about LACTAID® Milk and Dairy Products. Also, to access a recent webinar presentation about the topic featuring comedian and actress Angelica Vale as well as Sylvia, visit http://www.videonewswire.com/event.asp?id=61635.

About Sylvia:

Sylvia Melendez-Klinger is a registered dietitian and certified personal trainer as well as founder of Hispanic Food Communications, a culinary consulting company. Mrs. Klinger has an extensive public health nutrition background having conducted research at Northwestern University Medical School in Chicago and the University of California Irvine Medical Center and serving as supervising nutritionist for the Women, Infants and Children (WIC) supplemental feeding program. Mrs. Klinger is a member of the American Dietetic Association, Illinois Dietetic Association and Latino Hispanic Dietetic Association network group (LAHIDAN).

Breaking Through the Mammography Controversy

Individualized Decision Between Woman and Her Provider is the Best Choice for Screening

Breaking Through the Mammography Controversy

Breaking Through the Mammography Controversy

“The controversy around mammography emphasizes that the best decision on screening is made by a woman and her health care provider. Balancing a woman’s individual medical history, risks, and concern level about breast cancer is a decision at the individual level using guidelines as a guide and not as something fixed in concrete,” said Dr. Jane L. Delgado, President and CEO of the National Alliance for Hispanic Health, the nation’s leading Hispanic health advocacy group. “As a woman I want to make the decision about screening with my health care provider. Secretary Sebelius has offered assurance to the American people that she would work to ensure that such choice would not be limited by health insurance coverage policy.”

Dr. Delgado encouraged women to, “Talk to your health care provider about the risks of false positives that result from regular screening and radiation risks associated with screening and how to balance that with the benefits that mammography offers, particularly for women with higher risks for breast cancer.” According to Dr. Delgado, “The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has provided us with the best in available science, but the best decision will always be made by you and your health care provider. The Alliance is dedicated to ensuring that you will always have that choice.”

For women without access to a regular health care provider, the Alliance’s toll-free and bilingual Su Familia National Hispanic Family Health Helpline (1-866-SU-FAMILIA or 1-866-783-2645) is available to offer referral to low-cost and no-cost health services in a caller’s area. The service is available 9am to 6pm eastern standard time, Monday through Friday.

About the National Alliance for Hispanic Health

The National Alliance for Hispanic Health is the nation’s foremost science-based source of information and trusted advocate for the health of Hispanics in the United States. The Alliance represents thousands of Hispanic health providers across the nation providing services to more than 15 million each year, making a daily difference in the lives of Hispanic communities and families. For more information, call the Alliance’s Su Familia National Hispanic Family Health Helpline at 1-866-783-2645 or visit www.hispanichealth.org.

SOURCE National Alliance for Hispanic Health

Health Disparities Pose High Cost for American Economy

Researchers commissioned by the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies released a report Thursday, calculating the combined costs of health inequalities and premature death in the nation to be $1.24 trillion between 2003 and 2006. During that time, minorities spent nearly $230 billion in excess medical care costs. The Joint Center is a Washington, D.C.-based think tank that focuses on the concerns of African-Americans and communities of color.

“There is no question that reducing the health disparities can save incredible amounts of money — more importantly it can save lives,” said U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, adding that reducing health disparities is high on her administration’s agenda. “There’s no single explanation for the disparities outlined in today’s report. And there’s no single solution either. But we know that the two biggest contributors to these disparities are a lack of access to insurance and a lack of access to care.”

Health Disparities Pose High Cost for American Economy, Researchers Say

Health Disparities Pose High Cost for American Economy, Researchers Say

Researchers from Johns Hopkins University, George Washington University and the University of Maryland conducted the report.

“We divided the (study) sample into groups and then we asked which ethnic group has the best health status, sometimes it was Whites or some other group,” said Dr. Thomas LaVeist of Johns Hopkins University, one of three report authors, “We consider it to be a disparity if other groups weren’t doing as well in a category.”

Citizens of color are disproportionately burdened by disease yet have limited access to health services, resulting in excessive medical expenditures and lost potential productivity, said Dr. Brian Smedley, vice president and director of the Health Policy Institute at the Joint Center.

Of the total excess direct medical cost of health disparities, African-American expenditures accounted for more than 59 percent, while 35.7 percent and 5 percent are attributable to Hispanics and Asian-Americans respectively. Overall, minorities require more care to maintain their health and since more than half of the uninsured are people of color, the costs are higher for everything from emergency room visits to prescription drugs, according to the study.

Using government vitality and conservative medical cost statistics from the World Health Organization, researchers measured worker productivity, absenteeism and in case of death, forgone wages and lost tax revenue among other things to estimate how much the economy lost due to disparities. They then adjusted the results to the 2008 inflation rates.

Without primary care or other adequate health resources, minorities often defer treatment or forgo preventive care until it’s too late, experts say.

“We are using emergency rooms and services to try and access health care inefficiently and expensively—and often dangerously because people are sicker when they access those services,” Sebelius said.

African-Americans are more likely to die from conditions like heart disease, breast cancer, and strokes as compared with non-Hispanic White men. Hispanics are less likely to develop some diseases — like prostate cancer — but they die more often from them, according to statistics from the government’s Office of Minority Health.

LaVeist said chronic conditions are more prevalent in minority communities because of their location. Fewer supermarkets and healthy food options, as well as environmental hazards, are barriers to wellness.

“If I could suggest one thing that would have the greatest impact, it would be to offer high quality education to every child,” LaVeist said. “That would do more than anything we can do in the healthcare system.”

Drexel University’s Dr. Dennis Andrulis outlined areas where health reform proposals succeed and fail to address disparities. The expansion of Medicare eligibility standards will provide more affordable access while bills that eliminate bi-lingual and other language service programs will limit it.

“Accessibility, affordability and accountability, those are the three A’s of this discussion,” Clyburn said.

10.05% of Hispanic Americans consider themselves lactose intolerant
Breaking Through the Mammography Controversy
Health Disparities Pose High Cost for American Economy, Researchers Say
Kids with Cancer
Hispanic Children In U.S. At Greater Risk For Obesity Than Other Ethnic/Racial Groups

Source: Arelis Hernandez

Hispanics Tune in and Help Raise More Than $633,000 for Kids With Cancer During 2nd Annual Promesa & Esperanza Radiothon Benefiting St. Jude

Hispanic radio listeners in more than a dozen cities tuned in to help fight against childhood cancer, raising more than $633,000 in cash and pledges during the 2nd annual ‘Promesa y Esperanza’ (Promise and Hope) radiothon to benefit St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital(R). The two-day radiothon took place October 8 – 9 in Philadelphia, Charlotte, New Orleans, Providence, Norfolk, Durham, Nashville, Minneapolis, Kansas City, Louisville, Richmond and Springfield, Mass. Thousands of callers pledged their support for kids with cancer and other catastrophic diseases at St. Jude, one of the world’s premier pediatric cancer research centers.

Hispanics Tune in and Help Raise More Than $633,000 for Kids With Cancer During 2nd Annual Promesa & Esperanza Radiothon Benefiting St. Jude

Hispanics Tune in and Help Raise More Than $633,000 for Kids With Cancer During 2nd Annual Promesa & Esperanza Radiothon Benefiting St. Jude

Stations owned by Golden Door and Davidson Media Group (DMG) and its partner radio stations dedicated more than 30 hours of programming to further the mission of St. Jude by encouraging their listeners to pledge just $20 a month as anAngel de Esperanza (Angel of Hope). These donations help St. Jude maintain its promise that no child is ever denied treatment because of a family’s inability to pay. Since opening in 1962, St. Jude has treated children from all 50 states and around the world.

The hospital’s International Outreach Program (IOP) freely shares medical advancements achieved in the treatment of childhood cancer in developed countries to those with limited resources. As of June 2009, the St. Jude IOP program has partner clinics in 15 countries in Latin America and around the world, including Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Costa Rica, Venezuela, Ecuador, Chile and Brazil.

“This year’s radiothon was truly a great success and we are so proud to partner with St. Jude to help ensure that these sick children will have a fighting chance to live healthy and happy lives,” said Felix L. Perez, President and CEO of Davidson Media Group. Davidson Media Group owns 37 Radio stations in 19 different markets throughout the U.S.

Listeners had the opportunity to hear stories of survival from Hispanic children who are currently undergoing treatment, such as 3 year-old St. Jude patient Victor who was diagnosed with leukemia. At St. Jude, Victor received medical treatment at no costs to his family thanks to the generous donations from the community.

“Everyone at St. Jude is grateful for the generosity shown by the Hispanic community for our patients and their families,” said Richard C. Shadyac Jr., CEO of ALSAC, the fundraising organization of St. Jude. “It is heartwarming to see such an enthusiastic response during the Promesa y Esperanza radiothon, and we are inspired by the radio partners and donors who have embraced our lifesaving mission of finding cures and saving children.”

About St. Jude:

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital is internationally recognized for its pioneering work in finding cures and saving children with cancer and other catastrophic diseases. St. Jude is the first and only pediatric cancer center to be designated as a Comprehensive Cancer Center by the National Cancer Institute. Founded by late entertainer Danny Thomas and based in Memphis, Tenn., St. Jude freely shares its discoveries with scientific and medical communities around the world. St. Jude is the only pediatric cancer research center where families never pay for treatment not covered by insurance. No child is ever denied treatment because of the family’s inability to pay. St. Jude is financially supported by ALSAC, its fundraising organization. For more information, please visit www.stjude.org.

Source: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

Main image: The Children’s Neuroblastoma Cancer Foundation

Hispanic Children and Obesity Risk

Hispanic Children In U.S. At Greater Risk For Obesity Than Other Ethnic/Racial Groups

The prevalence of overweight in the US population is among the highest in Mexican-American children and adolescents. In a study of 1,030 Hispanic children between the ages of 4 and 19, published in the June 2009 issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, researchers from the Baylor College of Medicine found less than optimal diets in both overweight and non-overweight participants.

Hispanic Children and Obesity Risk

Hispanic Children In U.S. At Greater Risk For Obesity Than Other Ethnic/Racial Groups

Hispanic Children In U.S. At Greater Risk For Obesity Than Other Ethnic/Racial Groups

According to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES), in 2005-2006 the prevalence of overweight among children (2-19 years) from all ethnic/racial groups was 15.5%. For Mexican-American males and females (2-19 years) the prevalence was 23.2% and 18.5%, respectively. Although the US environment encourages a sedentary lifestyle and excess food intake, the Hispanic population is burdened with additional risk factors for childhood obesity including parental obesity, low socioeconomic status (SES), recent immigration, acculturation to US diet and lifestyle, and limited health insurance coverage.

The VIVA LA FAMILIA Study was designed to identify genetic and environmental factors contributing to childhood obesity in the Hispanic population. It provided the novel opportunity to assess the diet of a large cohort of Hispanic children from low-SES families at high risk for obesity (1,030 children from 319 families in Houston, Texas). On average, 91% of parents were overweight or obese and parental income and education levels were low. Food insecurity was reported by 49% of households.

Writing in the article, Nancy F. Butte, PhD, Professor, USDA/ARS Children’s Nutrition Research Center, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, states, “The diets of these low-SES Hispanic children were adequate in most essential nutrients, but suboptimal for the promotion of long-term health. Diet quality did not satisfy US dietary guidelines for fat, cholesterol, saturated fatty acids, fiber, added sugar, and sodium. Although energy intake was higher in overweight children, food sources, diet quality, and macro- and micronutrient composition were similar between non-overweight and overweight siblings…Knowledge of the dietary intake of children from low-SES Hispanic families at high risk for obesity will provide a basis on which to build nutritional interventions and policy that are appropriately tailored to population sub-groups.”

In a commentary published in the same issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Rafael Pérez-Escamilla, PhD, Professor of Nutritional Sciences & Public Health, Director, NIH EXPORT Center for Eliminating, Health Disparities among Latinos (CEHDL), University of Connecticut, Storrs, asks whether the process of acculturation into “mainstream” US society is having negative effects on Hispanics. Citing numerous studies, he explores many of the factors that both support and contradict the assimilation argument, and concludes that while acculturation is likely a negative influence, further study is warranted. He writes, “However, we still need to elucidate the mechanisms and the extent to which acculturation to the USA ‘mainstream’ culture per se explain deterioration in dietary quality, and increased risks for obesity and associated chronic diseases among Latinos. Filling in this gap in knowledge is essential for developing culturally appropriate and behavioral change based interventions targeting Latinos with different levels of acculturation.”

The article is “Nutrient adequacy and diet quality in non-overweight and overweight Hispanic children of low socioeconomic status – the VIVA LA FAMILIA Study” by Theresa A. Wilson, MS, RD, Anne L. Adolph, BS, and Nancy F. Butte, PhD. The commentary is “Dietary quality among Latinos: Is acculturation making us sick?” by Rafael Pérez-Escamilla, PhD. Both appear in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Volume 109, Issue 6 (June 2009) published by Elsevier.

Source: APA – Elsevier (2009, June 4). Hispanic Children In U.S. At Greater Risk For Obesity Than Other Ethnic/Racial Groups. ScienceDaily. Retrieved

Interactive Spanish Website for Celebrity Look-Alike Babies!

Leading Sperm Bank Now Offers Interactive Spanish Website

California Cryobank (CCB), an international sperm banking leader, announced today the release of their upgraded Spanish website www.criobanco.com. Criobanco.com offers all the features of CCB’s English website www.cryobank.com including online ordering, donor search capability, and extensive information on using donor sperm.

“California Cryobank has been servicing Latino communities all over the world for many years,” stated Cappy Rothman, MD, Co-founder. “Our goal is to make the process of selecting and using a sperm donor as easy as possible for our Spanish speaking clients.”

CCB offers Spanish speaking representatives available to assist clients over the phone at 866-927-9622 Mon-Fri from 6am-6pm (Pacific Time).

CCB is well known for their recently released celebrity Donor Look-a-Like website feature. “We have a wide selection of Latino donors who resemble celebrities such as Oscar De La Hoya, Javier Bardem, and Gael Garcia Bernal,” said Rothman.

California Cryobank also provides fertility preservation services to men who are faced with cancer treatments, vasectomies, or those in the military or other high-risk occupations.

Contact: Scott Brown of California Cryobank, +1-310-496-5681

Source: California Cryobank

10.05% of Hispanic Americans consider themselves lactose intolerant

Lactose Intolerant Hispanic Rates May Be Significantly Lower Than Previously Believed

New study sheds light on self-reported prevalence rates

Prevalence of lactose intolerance may be far lower than previously estimated, according to a study in the latest issue of Nutrition Today.(1)The study, which uses data from a national sample of three ethnic groups, reveals that the overall prevalence rate of self-reported lactose intolerance is 12 percent – with 7.72 percent of European Americans, 10.05 percent of Hispanic Americans and 19.5 percent of African Americans who consider themselves lactose intolerant.

10.05% of Hispanic Americans consider themselves lactose intolerant

10.05% of Hispanic Americans consider themselves lactose intolerant

These new findings indicate that previous estimates of lactose intolerance incidence – based on the incidence of lactose maldigestion – may be overestimated by wide margins. Previous studies have found lactose maldigestion, or low lactase activity in the gut, to occur in approximately 15 percent of European Americans, 50 percent of Mexican Americans and 80 percent of African Americans.(2,3,4) The new study shows that lactose intolerance, based on self-reported data, may actually occur far less frequently than presumed.

“There’s so much confusion surrounding lactose intolerance,” said Theresa Nicklas, DrPH, of the USDA/ARS Children’s Nutrition Research Center at Baylor College of Medicine and lead study author. “By getting a better handle on the true number of people who deal with this condition every day, the nutrition community can be better equipped to educate and provide dietary guidance for Americans, including strategies to help meet dairy food recommendations for those who self-report lactose intolerance.”

Since increasing daily consumption of dairy can be an effective strategy for ensuring adequate intake of shortfall nutrients (such as calcium, magnesium and potassium),(5) those who do experience symptoms of lactose intolerance should know there are several practical solutions that can allow for consumption of milk and milk products. In fact, according to a recent study in the Journal of Sensory Studies, adults who identified themselves as lactose intolerant reported a higher liking of lactose-free cow’s milk compared to non-dairy, soy-based substitute beverage.(6)

“Those with lactose intolerance are often relieved to know they can still enjoy the great taste and health benefits of dairy if they follow certain strategies,” said Orsolya Palacios, PhD, RD, and lead author of the study. “The symptoms of lactose intolerance vary greatly for each individual, and there are options in the dairy case that allow almost everyone to take advantage of the health benefits provided by the recommended three daily servings of dairy foods.”

Recommended Solutions for Incorporating Dairy

Several health authorities have addressed ways that those with lactose intolerance can benefit from dairy’s unique nutrient package of nine essential nutrients including calcium, potassium, magnesium and vitamin A, identified as “nutrients of concern” by the current Dietary Guidelines for Americans.(7) The Dietary Guidelines encourages people with lactose intolerance to try lower-lactose dairy food options to ensure they get the essential nutrients found in dairy. In a supplement to the October issue of the Journal of the National Medical Association (JNMA), the National Medical Association states that dairy milk alone provides a key package of essential nutrients, and that African Americans should use dietary strategies to increase the amount of dairy foods they consume. And in a 2006 report, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends children with lactose intolerance still consume dairy foods to help meet calcium, vitamin D, protein and other nutrient needs essential for bone health and overall growth. The report cautions that lactose intolerance should not require avoidance of dairy foods.(8)

The National Dairy Council has identified some strategies to help people with lactose intolerance enjoy the taste and nutrition of dairy:

  • The good news is lactose-free milk is regular milk, just without the lactose.
    • It provides the same unique package of nine essential nutrients as found in the equivalent form of regular milk (reduced-fat, fat-free etc.) – calcium, potassium, phosphorus, protein, vitamins A, D and B12, riboflavin and niacin (niacin equivalents).
  • Try drinking small amounts of milk with meals.
    • Consuming milk with other foods or a meal can make it easier to digest, so try milk on cereal, in smoothies or licuados, and enjoy a glass of milk with lunch or dinner.
  • Try cooking with milk.
    • Make oatmeal with milk instead of water and add milk to soups, sauces, casseroles, etc.
  • Try eating yogurt.
    • Yogurts that contain live and active cultures can make it easier for the digestive system to digest lactose.
  • Try aged cheeses.
    • Aged cheeses like Swiss, Parmesan, Gouda, Colby, provolone, Cheddar, Edam, Fontina, Gruyere, Muenster and Monterey Jack have very little lactose.

For more information, visit www.nationaldairycouncil.org, and get the latest dairy and nutrition news from NDC’s blog,www.thedairyreport.com.

10.05% of Hispanic Americans consider themselves lactose intolerant
Hispanic Children In U.S. At Greater Risk For Obesity Than Other Ethnic/Racial Groups
Latino Nutrition Month
Study highlights snacking differences between Hispanics, general population

National Dairy Council® (NDC) is the nutrition research, education and communications arm of Dairy Management Inc(TM). On behalf of U.S. dairy farmers, NDC provides science-based nutrition information to, and in collaboration with, a variety of stakeholders committed to fostering a healthier society, including health professionals, educators, school nutrition directors, academia, industry, consumers and media. Established in 1915, NDC comprises a staff of nutrition science researchers, registered dietitians and communications experts dedicated to educating the public on the health benefits of consuming milk and milk products throughout a person’s lifespan.

In addition, NDC funds independent research to aid in the ongoing discovery of information about dairy foods’ important role in a healthy lifestyle. This research provides insights to industry for new dairy product innovation. In partnership with its network of state and regional dairy councils, NDC disseminates nutrition programs, materials and research to support government recommendations for improved nutrition for Americans, including consumption of at least three servings of nutrient-rich low-fat or fat-free milk and milk products a day.

(1) Nicklas TA, Qu H, Hughes SO. Prevalence of self-reported lactose intolerance in a multi-ethnic sample of adults. Nutrition Today 2009; 44(5):186-187

(2) Jarvis JK, Miller GD. Overcoming the barrier of lactose intolerance to reduce health disparities. J Natl Med Assoc 2002; 94:55-56

(3) Sabi T. Hypolactasia and lactase persistence; historical review and terminology. Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology. Supplement 1994; 202:1-6

(4) Scrimshaw NS, Murray ED. Prevalence of lactose maldigestion. Am J Clin Nutr 1988; 48:1086-1098

(5) Nicklas TA, O’Neil CE, Fulgoni III VL. The role of dairy in meeting the recommendations for shortfall nutrients in the American diet. J Am Coll Nutr 2009; 28:1S-9S

(6) Palacios OM, Badran J, Drake MA, Reisner M, Moskowitz HR. Consumer acceptance of cow’s milk versus soy beverages; impact of ethnicity, lactose tolerance and sensory performance segmentation. Journal of Sensory Studies 2009; 24 (5): 731-748(18)

(7) U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture. Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2005. 6th Edition, Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, January 2005.

(8) American Academy of Pediatrics, Lactose intolerance in infants, children, and adolescents. Pediatrics. 2006; 118 (3):1279-1286

    For more information:
    NDC Media Hotline
    312-240-2880
    ndc@dairyinfo.com

SOURCE National Dairy Council

More Than 851,000 Members Join the Aflac Cancer Center Facebook Cause

Aflac ‘Causes Campaign on Facebook’ Raises $1.16 Million for Fight Against Pediatric Cancer

Aflac (NYSE: AFL) announced that it has raised more than $1.16 million for the Aflac Cancer Center through a matching grant campaign with Causes on Facebook, making it the largest sponsored campaign in the history of Causes. The effort also resulted in 851,215 new members joining the Aflac Cancer Center Cause, helping to generate awareness and financial support during Childhood Cancer Awareness Month.

The Causes application on Facebook has more than 85 million users who have created over 300,000 charitable causes that have benefited 60,000 nonprofits in the United States and Canada. Donors have used the Causes application on Facebook to give more than $14 million to these organizations. Prior to the launch of Aflac’s pediatric cancer Cause, the largest matching grant on a Facebook Cause was $100,000.

“Thanks to Aflac’s campaign to raise money for childhood cancer and blood disorders on Causes on Facebook, children at the Aflac Cancer Center will be assured cutting edge treatment and clinical research to get them back to being kids,” said Dr. William G. Woods, Director of the Aflac Cancer Center. “With every dollar raised we offer new hope for our kids and their families.”

“Our goal is to find a cure,” said Aflac chairman and CEO Dan Amos. “We want to thank the more than 851,000 people who rose to the challenge and joined Aflac’s fight against pediatric cancer. With their help we can continue the progress that has seen survival rates soar from 20 percent in the 1980’s to 80 percent today.”

Aflac Chairman and CEO Dan Amos personally contributed $100,000 to the cause, and his donation, like all the others, was matched dollar-for-dollar by Aflac. NASCAR driver Carl Edwards, who is sponsored by Aflac, responded to Amos’s gesture by contributing his portion of his team’s earnings from the September 6th race at the Atlanta Motor Speedway.

“Aflac’s $1 million initiative is the largest sponsored cause that we have ever seen on Facebook and it demonstrates the growing philanthropic power of Causes,” said Joe Green, founder of Causes. “This matching grant is a success not only because of the money raised, but also because 851,215 individuals were empowered to make a difference through peer to peer activism. We’re delighted that Aflac chose our application to generate awareness and that together, we were so successful in producing potentially life-saving results for children with cancer.”

Each year the Aflac Cancer Center treats more than 350 new cancer patients. It also provides the largest sickle cell disease program in America, with 1,635 active cases and has cured more children of sickle cell disease than any treatment center in the nation. In addition to funding research and treatment, Aflac contributions serve other critical needs, including new facilities, a new state-of-the-art pediatric research building, and endowments for the Family Support Team and Fellowship Program. In August, the Aflac Cancer Center announced that Aflac had surpassed $50 million in donations to this cause.

About Aflac:

For more than 50 years, Aflac products have given policyholders the opportunity to direct cash where it is needed most when a life-interrupting medical event causes financial challenges. As the number one provider of guaranteed-renewable insurance in the United States and the number one insurance company in terms of individual insurance policies in force in Japan, Aflac insurance products provide protection to more than 40 million people worldwide. In 2009, Aflac was recognized by Ethisphere magazine as one of the World’s Most Ethical Companies for the third consecutive year and was also named by the Reputation Institute as the Most Reputable Company in the Global Insurance Industry for the second consecutive year. In 2009 Fortune magazine recognized Aflac as one of the 100 Best Companies to Work For in America for the eleventh consecutive year. Fortune magazine also ranked Aflac No. 1 on its global list of America’s Most Admired Companies in the Life and Health Insurance category. Aflac appears on Hispanic Enterprise magazine’s list of the 50 Best Companies for Supplier Diversity and on Black Enterprise magazine’s list of the 40 Best Companies for Diversity. Aflac was also named by Forbes magazine as America’s Best-Managed Company in the Insurance category. Aflac Incorporated is a Fortune 500 company listed on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol AFL. To find out more about Aflac, visit aflac.com.

About Aflac Cancer Center and Blood Disorders Service of Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta:

The Aflac Cancer Center and Blood Disorders Service of Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta is a national leader among childhood cancer, hematology, and blood and marrow transplant programs, serving infants to young adults. Recognized as one of the top childhood cancer centers in the country by U.S.News & World Report, the Aflac Cancer Center treats more than 350 new cancer patients each year and follows more than 2,500 patients with sickle cell disease, hemophilia and other blood disorders. Visit www.aflaccancercenter.org or call 404-785-1112 or 888-785-1112 for more information.

SOURCE Aflac

Hispanics, Health Insurance and Health Care Access

Six-in-ten Hispanic adults living in the United States who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents lack health insurance, according to a new analysis by the Pew Hispanic Center of a survey it conducted in 2007.1The nationwide survey offers a detailed look at the health insurance and health care access of an immigrant subgroup that has become a focus of attention in the current debate over health care reform.

Hispanics, Health Insurance and Health Care Access

Hispanics, Health Insurance and Health Care Access

The share of uninsured among this group (60%) is much higher than the share of uninsured among Latino adults who are legal permanent residents or citizens (28%), or among the adult population of the United States (17%).

Hispanic adults who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents tend to be younger and healthier than the adult U.S. population and are less likely than other groups to have a regular health care provider. Just 57% say there is a place they usually go when they are sick or need advice about their health, compared with 76% of Latino adults who are citizens or legal permanent residents and 83% of the adult U.S. population.

Overall, four-in-ten (41%) non-citizen, non-legal permanent resident Hispanics state that their usual provider is a community clinic or health center. These centers are designed primarily as “safety nets” for vulnerable populations and are funded by a variety of sources, including the federal government, state governments and private foundations, as well as reimbursements from patients, based upon a sliding scale (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2008).

Some 15% of Latino adults who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents report that they use private doctors, hospital outpatient facilities or health maintenance organizations when they are sick or need advice about their health. Traditionally, patients in these settings are required to pay for their care, either via insurance or out of pocket.

An additional 6% of Latino adults who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents report that they usually go to an emergency room when they are sick or need advice about their health. Most emergency rooms are required by law to provide care to all patients. Patients are responsible for payment for emergency room services, but in some instances the Federal government partially reimburses hospitals for expenses the patients cannot afford.

Some 37% of Latino adults who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents have no usual health care provider. More than one-fourth (28%) of the people in this group indicate that financial limitations prevent them from having a usual provider — 17% report that their lack of insurance is the primary reason, while 12% cite high medical costs in general. However, a majority (56%) say they do not have a usual provider because they simply do not need one. An additional 5% state that difficulty in navigating the U.S. health care system prevents them from having a usual provider.

Undocumented immigrants and their children comprise 17% of the estimated 46 million Americanswho lack health insurance.2 According to Pew Hispanic Center estimates, 11.9 million undocumented immigrants were living in the U.S. in 2008. Three-quarters (76%) of these undocumented immigrants were Latinos.

Overall, about one-quarter of all adult Latinos are undocumented. Pew Hispanic Center analyses of Current Population Survey data indicate that approximately 98% of Hispanic immigrants who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents are undocumented. So, while the survey classification used in this report does not line up exactly with the Latino undocumented population, the two groups are nearly identical.

Health Status

The Latino population in the U.S. is relatively young, and Latino adults who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents are younger still. Some 43% of adult Latinos who are not citizens or legal permanent residents are younger than age 30, compared with 27% of Hispanic adults who are citizens or legal permanent residents and 22% of the adult U.S. population. The youthfulness of this population contributes to its relative healthiness. Among adult Latinos who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents, about one-third (34%) report that they either missed work, or spent at least half a day in bed over the past year, because of illness or injury. The rate rises to 42% among adult Latinos who are citizens or legal permanent residents and to 52% among the U.S. adult population.

Experiences in the Health Care System

Three-fourths (76%) of Latino adults who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents report that the quality of medical care they received in the past year was excellent or good. This is similar to the proportion of adult Latino citizens and legal permanent residents (78%) who express satisfaction with their recent health care.

However, when asked a separate question — whether they had received any poor medical treatment in the past five years — adult Latinos who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents are less likely (16%) to report any problems than are Latinos who are citizens or legal permanent residents (24%).

Among those Latinos who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents who report receiving poor medical treatment in the past five years, a plurality (46%) state that they believed their accent or the way they spoke English contributed to that poor care. A similar share (43%) believed that their inability to pay for care contributed to their poor treatment. More than one-third (37%) felt that their race or ethnicity played a part in their poor care, and one-fourth (25%) attributed the unsatisfactory treatment to something in their medical history.

When asked about their most recent medical appointment, three-fourths (76%) of Latino adults who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents report that they felt comforted or relieved by the visit, and 69% report feeling reassured. Much smaller proportions left their most recent medical visit feeling frustrated (31%) or confused (27%).


1. Except where noted, results are based on the 2007 Pew Hispanic Center/Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Latino Health Survey, in which a nationally representative sample of 4,013 Latinos were surveyed from July 16 to Sept. 23, 2007 (see Livingston, Minushkin and Cohn, 2008).
2. March 2009 Current Population Survey data show that 15% of American adults and children lack health insurance.

By Gretchen Livingston, Senior Researcher, Pew Hispanic Center

Latino Nutrition Month Oldways Releases Latino Health Tool Kit

Target Latino thanks the Latino Nutrition Coalition and Oldways for allowing us to publish this important information for dissemination within our community. Let’s hope that we all work together for the betterment of our nutrition and that of our children.

—————-

BOSTON, September 15, 2009 – In celebration of Latino Nutrition Month from September 15 through October 15, Oldways and the Latino Nutrition Coalition (LNC) have released Latino Living – A Guide to Better Health Through Traditional Food and Active Lifestyles – for both consumers and health professionals.

“Latino Living was originally designed for health professionals and dietitians, but it is so user friendly and simple that it’s perfect for consumers from coast to coast,” said Sara Baer-Sinnott, Executive Vice President of Oldways.

Latin Diet Pyramid - Copyright 2009 Oldways Preservation & Exchange Trust - http://www.oldwayspt.org/

Latin Diet Pyramid – Copyright 2009 Oldways Preservation & Exchange Trust – http://www.oldwayspt.org/

For Consumers, the kit offers:

  • A 7-day Healthy Latino Meal Plan, with recipes and grocery list.
  • A bilingual Latino Lifestyle Calendar, featuring a tip-a-day for following the healthy Latin American diet.
  • New, illustrated, bilingual Latin American Diet Pyramid, with basic guidelines to help plan daily meals.

The following in both English and Spanish:

  • A list of Latin American super foods
  • Kitchen Strategies: time savers and smart swaps
  • Tip for Kids: cooking, lunches and snacks
  • Tips on how to exercise with your family

For Health Professionals and RDs, the kit offers:

  • All of the above, PLUS
  • Statistics concerning obesity, nutrition, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer rates occurring in the Latino American population.
  • A detailed explanation of the Latin American Diet Pyramid, along with basic guidelines that help plan daily meals.
  • Weekly Goal Tracking and 24-Hour Recall Sheets.

Consumers, health professionals and RDs can request this free resource (on CD-Rom or online) by emailing or calling Adriene Worthington (aworthington@oldwayspt.org, 617-896-4876.

Coinciding with National Hispanic Heritage Month, Latino Nutrition Month will introduce consumers to a variety of ways to cook, eat and enjoy the Latino diet pattern. The introduction of an updated Latin American Diet Pyramid will stress the importance of putting plant foods such as fruits, veggies, grains (mostly whole), nuts and peanuts, beans and spices at the core of one’s diet. Additionally, consumers can enter Oldways/LNC’s Latin American Diet Recipe Contest (see below) to win a variety of prizes.

See what else is happening during Latino Nutrition Month on the Oldways and LNC websites. These programs include:

1. An updated Camino Mágico, a downloadable, bi-lingual supermarket shopping guide to help Latino shoppers make healthy choices among the endless food options available at supermarkets today.

2. Latin American Diet Recipe Contest featured on the Oldways and LNC websites and on the Official Oldways Table Blog. Consumers should submit a recipe that uses at least two Latin American Diet products (list is featured on the Oldways Table Blog).  Winners will be drawn at the end of the month, and announced on our websites.  Prizes include wonderful Latino food products, autographed copies of our widely-praised book, The Oldways Table, chock-full of wonderful recipes and short essays about food and wine experiences, and the new poster of the Latin American Diet Pyramid.

3. A 2′ X 3′ poster with an updated illustration of the Latin American Diet Pyramid will be available at The Oldways Store on September 21, 2009.

Links:

Find Oldways on Twitter – OldwaysPT

Find the LNC on Twitter – LatinoNutrition

Oldways on Facebook – Become a Fan!

The Official Oldways Blog – The Oldways Table

About Oldways and the Latino Nutrition Coalition

Oldways is an internationally-respected non-profit, changing the way people eat through practical and positive programs grounded in science, traditions, and delicious foods and drinks.  The Latino Nutrition Coalition is an Oldways program inspiring Latinos to improve and maintain their health through traditional foods and active lifestyles. LNC members include: General Mills; Herdez; Splenda; La Moderna; Mission Foods; National Watermelon Promotion Board; The Peanut Institute; Soyfoods Association of North America; Splenda  Sweetener Products; United States Potato Board; and Wisconsin Milk  Marketing Board.  You can learn more at www.oldwayspt.org and www.latinonutrition.org.

Header photography credit: IStockPhoto