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Uncovered Facts About Online Hispanic Women and their Media Usage

Are you considering going after the online Hispanic women market? Here’s all your questions on their online media usage answered but to find out you must read every word of this comprehensive report.

Online Hispanic women are social networking butterflies

Online Hispanic women are social networking butterflies

One of the main factors that decisively affects business profitability and ROI is market share. The connection between market share and profitability has been recognized by scholars, business executives and consultants.

Hispanic women in the U.S will reach 51 million by 2050 and will make up 25% of the total U.S female population by 2050, according to Hispan Telligence.

If we add the fact that U.S. Hispanics are ahead of the curve when it comes to digital, they lead in adoption of new devices, are power users of mobile and over-index in video consumption, the conclusion is clear. It’s time to pay attention to the online Hispanic women market.

Hispanic women RULE in digital

Many brands believe that the only places to reach online Hispanic women are lifestyle magazines, celebrity gossip and mommy sites. While these sites are very effective in reaching them, Hispanic women trace their own path and can be found in other online properties in droves and we will cover these shortly. You just have to know where to look.

Check Out These Uncovered Facts About Online Hispanic Women and their Media Usage

Uncovered Facts About Online Hispanic Women and their Media Usage

Online Hispanic women are social networking butterflies

Hispanic women of all ages engage in a multitude of online activities, such as blogging, photo-sharing, gaming, video viewing and instant messaging. Mobile social networking is a habitual practice in the lives of today’s women.

Social retail, clearly demonstrated by the percentage of women that participate on Pinterest and because it combines two activities that are already firmly embedded in the daily activity of online women, is the next logical step in this evolution.

Women transact online more than men

In the U.S., currently the largest e-commerce market in the world, women are the key drivers of online buying. More women than men conduct business online and, collectively, they spend more. Women account for 85% of consumer purchases (She-conomy) and 58% of U.S. ecommerce spend but in spite of this, 91% of women say advertisers don’t understand them.

Differences between women and men on Social Networks

Even when their online behavior is similar, motivations can differ widely between the two genders. The adoption of Twitter is a great example – both genders adopted this technology at similar rates, but for different purposes. Men are far more likely to post their own Tweets than women. Meanwhile, a larger percentage of female Twitter users say they use the site to find deals and promotions. Women are also more likely to use the service as a conversation medium, to ask for help from other users and to follow celebrities. (comScore)

Online Hispanic Women Social Media and Other Web Media Use

Girls dominate visual platforms - Pew Internet 2015

Girls dominate visual platforms – Pew Internet 2015

Social Media Networks with the largest incidence of Hispanic demographics are Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest.

Facebook

73% of adult Latino internet users (18+ years old) say they have a Facebook account with a slightly higher Hispanic women presence in the social network. (Pew Research Center 2014)

Twitter

25% of Hispanics are on Twitter versus a 21% of non-Hispanic whites. The site’s reach is marginally higher among men than among women. Still, this is a great network to reach a college-educated, affluent, and urbanite demographic.

Instagram, Flickr, Other Photo Sharing Sites

Hispanic women surpass men in every age group in both reach and time spent on photo sites. They were also much faster to adopt photo sharing when it first reached the market.

SnapChat tends to be used by wealthier teenagers - Pew Internet 9-4-15

SnapChat tends to be used by wealthier teenagers – Pew Internet 9-4-15

Instagram has the largest percentage of Hispanics out of all other social networks. 34% of Instagram users are Hispanics, a much higher percentage than their white counterpart (21%). This demographic skews much younger, especially in the 18 to 29 years old segment. Besides young adults, women are particularly likely to be on Instagram, along with those who live in urban or suburban environments.

Pinterest

Pinterest does not fall behind on the Hispanic forefront. Definitely the Queendom of women, with 21% of Hispanic Pinterest users, looking for inspiration, this is “the” place to be. The first social commerce network (I really hate calling it a social network as Pinterest has always been so much more than that and by the way, don’t miss out on these outstanding Pinterest for Business statistics when you are done reading this article. If you are not active on it, you will want to be.)

To sum up: Women dominate Pinterest with 42% of online women using the platform, compared with 13% of online men.

SnapChat

Did you know that 70% of SnapChat users are women? And they are a very young demographic. Now, let’s do the math. There’s a much higher incidence of Hispanics on Gen Y and Gen Z than on any other generation. If you have not considered a SnapChat campaign for your Latina teens, you may be missing the mark.

Read What Everybody Ought To Know about the Latino market to discover even more

LinkedIn

LinkedIn seems to rank low on Hispanic demographics with just an 18 percent of adult Hispanics but if you are looking for online Hispanic women who are college-graduates and between the ages 30-64, then this is your site.

Remember that users are becoming more and more multiplatform and if you find them on Pinterest, it is highly likely you will also find them on Twitter and Facebook.

Source: September 2014, the Pew Research Center

Online Video Sites

59% of all Hispanics are on YouTube and 72% of Hispanic Americans using YouTube’s app. By the same token, YouTube has the higher share of viewed minutes for online women.

Universal has a Universal Latino YouTube channel dedicated channel to online Hispanics. You can read more about their success in driving this audience on this article.

Online Streaming

Latinos stream way more online TV than their white counterparts, according to Nielsen: “Latinos on average watch 6 hours and 22 minutes of online video per month, whereas white viewers clock 3 hours and 44 minutes on average.”

There are several players in this field.

Hulu Latino, has been developing its own original content. Hulu Original Latino Series ‘East Los High’ Receives Three Daytime Emmy Nominations. They are partners with Univision, Galavision and Telefutura. In 2012, Hulu Latino added shows from new partners Azteca America, Butaca, Caracol Televisión, Comarex, Estrella TV, Imagina US, Laguna Productions, Maya Entertainment, RCTV, Todobebe Inc and Venevision.

MiTu Latino is a multi-channel streaming network that receives over 100 million views per month and in just two years it amassed an audience of more than 36 million subscribers.

mun2, re-branded as NBC Universo on February 1, 2015, was the fastest growing Hispanic cable network with women 18-49 in total day Monday -Sunday 6a.m.- 2a.m., +8% year-over-year.  The network continued its double-digit growth with women. Source: Nielsen Media Research.

Radio

We cannot skip online radio, so we’ll take a look at the Pandora demographics. These are mostly Hispanics Males/Females younger than 24yrs old no college, some grad school, income range $0 – 55k, no kids. This is a very young demographic.

Hispanic Women and Online Search

Language used by Hispanic women to surf the web

Language used by Latinas to surf the web

“Latinas search in English for information in Spanish. Beyond language, a majority (62 percent) of Latinas wish for more lifestyle information about Latinas online, and over sixty percent want more lifestyle information written in Spanish. When Latinas search for Latino subject matter online, recipes top the list, followed by news, music, family health, beauty and celebrations.” Source: Comscore

Google is the most popular search engine among both genders but their behavior on Bing displays an interesting behavioral twist. In general, men perform a higher number of search queries than women (71.6 searches per searcher for men vs. 64.0 for women). When it comes down to Bing, Hispanic women perform a much higher number of searches than males that use this search engine do.

Google has seen the number of Google search queries that include common Spanish-language question words nearly double over the past 3 years. If you still think of “Hispanic Marketing” as “Spanish Marketing,” it’s time to re-evaluate your knowledge of this market. Looking for Spanish SEO or Spanish Inbound marketing will not help you capture a solid market share of the Hispanic market in the U.S., unless you only want to target this particular Hispanic market segment. But remember that even people who have recently immigrated to the U.S. will eventually be searching in English, Spanish and Spanglish.

Combine cultural relevance with language to get to the winning formula. – Havi Goffan

Why you need a Hispanic Inbound Marketing Agency

Hispanic Women market Opportunities & Challenges

I wouldn’t end this article without providing some tips and data regarding the Hispanic women market. Here are a few of the market’s opportunities and challenges.

Opportunities

  • Once a brand is identified as a trustworthy one, Hispanic women will share the news with family, friends, co-workers and this might lead these reference groups to continue the buzz about the brand around their own set of groups.
  • Customer relationship management is another important aspect to consider when marketing to Hispanics. Both from a cultural and language perspectives, this audience deserves careful consideration. The last thing a business should do is generate interest in their products or services to lose them once they form part of the customer-base.
  • Coupons have an influence on the Latino consumer’s decision.
  • Latina Bloggers have a strong influence in the purchasing decisions of many Hispanic moms.
  • 33% of Hispanic moms claim to have learned more about products and brands from online ads than from traditional media. Don’t forget internet ads!
  • Hispanic women are also more open to companies’ content: 57% said they read emails from brands while only 19% of U.S. moms do so.

Challenges

  • Brand loyalty towards one brand vs. another is very strong in some industries – e.g., the baby care industry. It may be based on brands used by previous generations or it built out of a product trial.
  • Hispanic women email lists need to be built in-house. Otherwise, be prepared to pay heftily for a solid list.
  • Trust generation is one of the most important achievements when targeting the Hispanic women market.

This audience IS the future. Play it smart and play it well. If you were doing business in China, you wouldn’t leave your marketing in the hands of people who knew nothing about the language and the culture, right? And there’s even more variations of Spanish than versions of Chinese. Don’t blame the market for not responding to your campaigns. The numbers are there and they are yours for the taking.

Words to live by

Words to live by

Next Quote? funny inspirational quotes on every post!

Why Marketers Should Care About Reaching Latina Bloggers

Speaking about Latina Bloggers is Elianne Ramos is the principal and CEO of Speak Hispanic Communications and vice-chair of Communications and PR for LATISM.

Elianne Ramos is the principal and CEO of Speak Hispanic Communications and vice-chair of Communications and PR for LATISM.

The first gift of the season goes to my dear friend, Elianne Ramos.:)  Elianne is an incredibly talented, knowledgeable, and hard working human being, she is the Principal & CEO of Speak Hispanic communications and vice-chair of Communications and PR for Latinos in Social Media (LATISM.) She is constantly on the go, generating great ideas and positively impacting the U.S. community. As if this wasn’t enough, she was the vice president, creative director and founder of i3 Creative Group, managing production teams working concurrently in the United States, Mexico, Uruguay and Argentina. In over 15 years of  creative direction, copy writing, public speaking, public relations and TV commercial production experience, Elianne has developed broadcast, multimedia and social media campaigns for high-profile clients. Her writing has appeared in numerous books and publications including the Chicken Soup for the Soul series and now, for the first time-ever, on the Hispanic Marketing blog.

Please, enjoy Elianne’s article. Elianne, this one is with all of the Target Latino love.

Why Marketers Should Care About Reaching Latina Bloggers

Even with the well-documented explosion of the Hispanic market, Internet sources like Technorati, which by 2008 was indexing 112.8 million blogs, have never touched upon the topic of Latinas and blogging. With the release of the Latinos in Social Media’s Latina Blogger Survey, though, it is now official: Latina bloggers are increasing their numbers and spreading throughout the blogosphere.

The intrinsic characteristics of blogging, where the private becomes public and communities rally together around common interests, make it the perfect platform for Latinas to voice life from their viewpoint … in in two languages, no less!

Beyond the obviously good news that these bloggers now provide us with a new outlet for furthering our brands’ messages—what with ever-shrinking minority-outreach budgets—the implications of this Latina blogger explosion for PR and marketing professionals are many:

The Good

• In Latino culture, where word-of-mouth and group interaction are second-nature, the trustworthiness of a blog post wrapped in a culturally relevant package can certainly influence the value of a brand in the eyes of their thousands of followers.

• These bloggers provide us with micro-niche audiences and more targeted outlets for furthering our brands’ messages. Stories published and promoted online have the potential to reach a greater number of people in very little time. In this context, a Latina blogger outreach program puts us in an ideal position to secure widespread coverage for our clients.

• Most Latinas blog in English, followed closely by Spanish and peppered with Spanglish, which means that their potential reach is amplified. Their choice of language in this case may be more about connecting with their readership, not necessarily a reflection of the language they speak more fluently. The key is listening and doing your homework in order to find the perfect fit.

• Latina bloggers are actively engaged in social media, and they tend to belong to tight, supportive communities online. Besides the fact that your message will reach well beyond the scope of the blog, this also means that other influencers in their communities will help disseminate it.

• Their culture infuses their writing but does not rule it.  Contrary to expectations, Latinas blog about numerous subjects, which opens up possibilities for different types of brand engagement.

• These Latinas are at the epicenter of merging worlds: between traditional and modern roles, between English and Spanish, between American and Latino cultures. They will bring a fresh perspective to your message, one that most closely reflects the Latina experience in the US.

The Bad

• Brand credibility: With consumers now doing research online and even generating their own content, consumers are less likely to believe a product review that blatantly comes from a sponsorship.

• Relative lack of control over the message: Know that consumers will be getting and act on impressions about your brand from less than perfect sources. Bloggers are not necessarily a self-regulating bunch, at least not yet. The fact that they can and will write whatever they want in their blog might create public relations issues. Just be sure to monitor their blogs, so you can address any issues or comments and give your official brand perspective, if need be.

• Saturation: With the fast growth rate of this segment, the Latina blogger market is likely to become saturated fast, which means their individual reach will, at some point and with few exceptions, start to diminish. This being a relatively young blogging community also means that the time to reach out to them is now.

The Ugly

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is cracking down on so-called “Blogola” by regulating blogger/advertiser relationships. The rules were updated December 2009.

The new rules include the fact that now bloggers must disclose material connections with a brand: whether they are receiving payment or free products and the kind of relationship they have with the company. What’s more, now both the brand and the blogger are subject to liability for misleading or unsubstantiated representations made. This means that the potential of a company being held responsible for approving unfounded claims—not rare in this realm—is a very real one. While the FTC regulations are beginning to be applied, the blogger outreach game is still an evolving one. The main things to keep in mind seem to be transparency, clear objectives and open ears: a willingness to listen and adjust, if need be.

Though a blogging campaign may be a godsend of great, relatively inexpensive publicity, remember that it is also —or should be—part of a larger communications/PR plan. Make sure all other elements of the campaign support your Latina blogging outreach and vice versa. If you do it right, Latina blogueras will rally behind your efforts with the same pasión they pour into their Web writing every day.

What has been your experience in reaching out to Latina bloggers? Please share in the comments below.

inspirational quote

inspirational quote

Cell Phone Is Single Females’ New Best Friend

Some 12% of females surveyed said that they would be less likely to date someone if they had a big and bulky cell phone | Single mobile females all you Wanted to Know

Some 12% of females surveyed said that they would be less likely to date someone if they had a big and bulky cell phone

Single mobile females (SMFs) – young single women who have cell phones – assign to their mobile devices an important role in relationships and dating, organizing their lives, and in fashion, according to a recent study commissioned by Samsung Telecommunications America.

“The cell phone is an integral part of the SMF’s life, serving as a pocket-size detective, matchmaker, wing-woman and beyond. It is now officially a girl’s best friend,” said Randy Smith, VP of channel marketing for Samsung.

Single mobile females all you Wanted to Know

Among the survey findings:

Single mobile females all you Wanted to Know

Single mobile females all you Wanted to Know

  • More than two-thirds of women (73%) of women have ditched traditional, paper address books for their cell phones to keep track of contacts.
  • The average number of cell phone contacts is 63.
  • Almost one-third of respondents said they can tell a good amount about a person by the type of cell phone they have (32%).
  • Some 12% of females surveyed said that they would be less likely to date someone if they had a big and bulky cell phone.
  • Nearly three-quarters of females surveyed look at their cell phone, rather than their watch, to get the time (74%).
  • More than one out of three SMFs have had a friend call them to interrupt a date (34%).
  • A whopping 70% said they have snooped on their significant other’s cell phone – for example, by looking through text messages or picking up their phone to see who is calling.
  • Single mobile females use cell phones to avoid calls: 40% have faked technical difficulties to avoid someone they were not interested in dating.
  • Nearly four out of ten (39%) single women have suffered from “text shame:” sending a text message and then waking up the next morning realizing that they said something they shouldn’t have.
  • Nearly half of survey respondents prefer to flirt with someone they are interested in via text message when they are away from them (48%).
  • More than 10% of females surveyed say the “three day rule” – waiting to call someone until three days after a first date – only applies to calling, and one can send a text message to someone before day three (13%).
  • 78% of females surveyed prefer to give their cell phone number to someone they are attracted to.

About the study: The survey, commissioned by Samsung, was conducted by Kelton Research and included more than 500 US unmarried females ages 18 to 35 who have a cell phone.

word

word

Hispanics Create More than Half of Food Growth

Hispanics accounted for 57.7% of sales growth in the food, beverage and restaurant sector.

Hispanics accounted for 57.7% of sales growth in the food, beverage and restaurant sector.

In addition to being the largest driver of college enrollment growth, Hispanics have also become the most important U.S. demographic growth driver in the food, beverage and restaurant sectors, according to data from a Hispanic market research study.

The U.S. Hispanic segment made up more than 50% of real U.S. food, beverage and restaurant growth between 2005 and 2008, generating $52 billion of new inflation-adjusted spending. In contrast, non-Hispanics generated $40 billion of new inflation adjusted spending during the same period. This means that between 2005 and 2008, Hispanics accounted for 57.7% of sales growth in the food, beverage and restaurant sector.

The analysis indicates this growth can be attributed primarily to an increase in the number of U.S. Hispanic households, and secondly to an increase in consumer spending among U.S. Hispanics (which should likely continue rising as more Hispanics obtain college degrees and increase their earning potential).

Source: Latinum

Yoda wisdom

Yoda wisdom

U.S. Illegal Immigrant Population Down

The number of illegal immigrants in the U.S. declined by one million since its peak in 2007

The number of illegal immigrants living in the U.S. dropped by one million people in two years, according to new estimates by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Government officials believe 10.8 million illegal immigrants lived in the country in Jan. 2009, down from a peak of nearly 12 million in 2007. If the official estimates are correct, not since 2005 has the population of illegal immigrants been as low as it was last year. The report, produced annually since 2005, is the government’s official tabulation of immigrants living here illegally.
Source: Poder360

Inside Hispanic America

by Claudia “Havi” Goffan

Winner of the Publisher’s Multicultural Award Category: Best Multicultural Awareness Article

What is life like in America for Hispanic Americans?  What are their thoughts and concerns about family, employment, education, religion, opportunities, and healthcare?  We asked Claudia Goffan, founder of Target Latino, an Atlanta based marketing and consulting firm specializing in the Hispanic market, to provide “The College World Reporter” readers with her own views from inside Hispanic America. Here is our interview:

Claudia "Havi" Goffan - Hispanic Marketing Expert and CEO of Target Latino

Claudia “Havi” Goffan – Hispanic Marketing Expert and CEO of Target Latino

Q.Could you give us an inside look at Hispanic or Latino life?

A. To fully understand the Hispanic market, you need to analyze it by country of origin, level of acculturation, age, sex, marital status and educational level. Although some generalizations can be made, they have to be understood as such and not as an answer to comprehending the culture.

Let’s talk about some of the generalizations about the Hispanic culture. The very first one that comes to mind is about family being the first priority, the children are celebrated and sheltered and the wife usually fulfills a domestic role. Hispanics have a long Roman Catholic tradition and this usually implies quite a fatalistic outlook where destiny is in the hands of God. Latin American educational system is based on emphasis on the theoretical, memorization and a rigid and very broad curriculum. It follows the French schooling system and it translates into people who are generalists and look at the big picture as opposed to specialists, like in the U.S. Hispanics are highly nationalistic, very proud of long history and traditions.

Hispanics have difficulty separating work and personal relationships and are sensitive to differences of opinion. Hispanics fear loss of face, especially publicly and shun confrontation, where truth is tempered by the need for diplomacy. Title and position are more important than money in the eyes of Hispanic society. Etiquette and manners are seen as a measure of breeding and it follows an “old world” formality. Dress and grooming are status symbols whereas in the U.S. appearance is secondary to performance. The aesthetic side of life is important even at work.

Q. Tell us about the purchasing power of the U.S. Hispanics?

A. According to the University of Georgia’s Selig Center for Economic Growth in 2004 the nation’s largest minority group controlled $686 billion in spending. The community’s purchasing power comprises the world’s ninth biggest economy and it’s larger than the GNP of Brazil, Spain or Mexico. Hispanic purchasing power is projected to reach as much as $1 trillion by next year (2010) being the main drivers of the surge in Hispanic consumer influence the increasing education levels, labor force composition, household characteristics and accumulation of wealth. The fastest-growing occupational categories for Hispanics are higher paying managerial and professional jobs.

Q. What about Hispanics’ Healthcare Access?

A. I will quote a new analysis by the Pew Hispanic Center that indicates that six-in-ten Hispanic adults living in the United States who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents lack health insurance. According to this same study, the share of uninsured among this group (60%) is much higher than the share of uninsured among Latino adults who are legal permanent residents or citizens (28%), or among the adult population of the United States (17%). Hispanic adults who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents tend to be younger and healthier than the adult U.S. population and are less likely than other groups to have a regular health care provider. Just 57% say there is a place they usually go when they are sick or need advice about their health, compared with 76% of Latino adults who are citizens or legal permanent residents and 83% of the adult U.S. population.

Overall, four-in-ten (41%) non-citizen, non-legal permanent resident Hispanics state that their usual provider is a community clinic or health center. These centers are designed primarily as “safety nets” for vulnerable populations and are funded by a variety of sources, including the federal government, state governments and private foundations, as well as reimbursements from patients, based upon a sliding scale (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2008).

Six out of 10 Hispanics are U.S.-born - Inside Hispanic America

Six out of 10 Hispanics are U.S.-born – Inside Hispanic America

The study also reports that some 37% of Latino adults who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents have no usual health care provider. More than one-fourth (28%) of the people in this group indicate that financial limitations prevent them from having a usual provider – 17% report that their lack of insurance is the primary reason, while 12% cite high medical costs in general. However, a majority (56%) say they do not have a usual provider because they simply do not need one. An additional 5% state that difficulty in navigating the U.S. health care system prevents them from having a usual provider. According to Pew Hispanic Center estimates, 11.9 million undocumented immigrants were living in the U.S. in 2008. Three-quarters (76%) of these undocumented immigrants were Latinos.

Regarding health status, the study reports that the Latino population in the U.S. is relatively young, and Latino adults who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents are younger still. Some 43% of adult Latinos who are not citizens or legal permanent residents are younger than age 30, compared with 27% of Hispanic adults who are citizens or legal permanent residents and 22% of the adult U.S. population.  The youthfulness of this population contributes to its relative healthiness.

About the Hispanic experiences in the Health Care System, the Pew reports that three-fourths (76%) of Latino adults who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents report that the quality of medical care they received in the past year was excellent or good. This is similar to the proportion of adult Latino citizens and legal permanent residents (78%) who express satisfaction with their recent health care. However, when asked a separate question – whether they had received any poor medical treatment in the past five years – adult Latinos who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents are less likely (16%) to report any problems than are Latinos who are citizens or legal permanent residents (24%).

Among those Latinos who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents who report receiving poor medical treatment in the past five years, a plurality (46%) state that they believed their accent or the way they spoke English contributed to that poor care. A similar share (43%) believed that their inability to pay for care contributed to their poor treatment. More than one-third (37%) felt that their race or ethnicity played a part in their poor care, and one-fourth (25%) attributed the unsatisfactory treatment to something in their medical history.

Q. What is the difference in viewpoint between young Hispanics or Latinos born and raised in the United States, and their older parents or grandparents who migrated to the U.S. from other countries?

A. The one difference that applies to all Latinos existent between non and semi-acculturated Hispanics and fully-acculturated or U.S. born Hispanics (young or old) is that whereas the non and semi-acculturated Latinos are trying to learn how to navigate the American culture, the U.S. born Hispanics or fully-acculturated know how to navigate the American culture and “learn” to navigate the Hispanic one from their family.

Q. Who are people on the rise in the Hispanic or Latino community that may become corporate leaders, or the next Sonia Sotomayor?

A. There are many Hispanics on the rise in every walk of life in the United States. Some people may not even notice of their Hispanic background because it usually comes to light when there are political issues at stake. For example, a currently retired doctor that was the Director of Cardiology of the St. Joseph’s Hospital in Atlanta was originally from Argentina. The creative that many years ago came up with the successful campaign for a drug that put the country to sleep is a Nuyorican (Puerto Rican born in New York).

Regarding known Latinos on the rise, you may want to keep an eye on Christine Arguello, Judge, U.S. District Court, Colorado; Emiliano Calemzuk, President, Fox Television Studios; Ignacia Moreno, Counsel, Corporate Environmental Programs, General Electric Company; Esther Salas, U.S. Magistrate Judge, District of New Jersey; Thomas Saenz, President and General Counsel, Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund (MALDEF); Hilda Solis, Secretary of Labor; Rosa Gumatatotao Rios, United States Treasurer; Elena Rios, President & CEO, National Hispanic Medical Foundation; Enrique Conterno; President, Eli Lilly, USA and Edward Chavez, Justice, the State of New Mexico Supreme Court, among many others.

Q. What should everyone know about Hispanics or Latinos?

A. The first thing that comes to mind is the very little known fact that 6 out of 10 Latinos are U.S. born.  The second one is that the younger the generation, the higher the percentage of Hispanics in it. It is imperative to understand the new U.S. demographics when developing business strategies, city planning, new products, etc.

About Claudia Goffan: Recognized as an expert in Latino Marketing by CNN en Español, Claudia has been featured in Adweek, Hispanic Business, Univision, Telemundo and other national and international media.

A native from Buenos Aires, Argentina, Claudia has been very influential in the Hispanic markets in the U.S. and Latin America – both from a business and a community standpoint – always with outstanding results. Claudia has contributed to companies such as, The Occasions Group, The Taylor Corporation, El Banco de Nuestra Comunidad (A division of SunTrust Bank), XEROX, AT&T, BellSouth, Citibank, Papa John’s, Liberty Mutual, British Telecom, Gold’s Gym, Sherwin Williams, and Verizon, among others.

A motivator, strategic and hands-on, innovative, creative and resourceful. It has been said that her humor and presence immediately captivate audiences. She has an MBA from the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina and from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), and more than 20 years specializing in Marketing and Strategic Planning both internationally and domestically. She is bilingual and bicultural in English and Spanish and fluent in Portuguese, French, and Italian.

About Target Latino: Target Latino was founded in 2003, with a vision unparalleled at the time – to show American companies the importance of the U.S. Hispanic market – not by preaching but by acting. Target Latino is a marketing consulting firm specializing in the Hispanic market and inbound strategies.  Target Latino has a long standing experience of driving results in tough economic times.  Target Latino is minority owned, and a percentage of its proceeds go to different charity causes.

So true. Great Quotes

Great quote

Understanding Latino Boomers

Understanding Latino Boomers

Understanding Latino Boomers

Focalyst, a reseach firm specialized in seniors and boomers, presented the results of a new study that provides valuable insights on one of the most complex segments of the U.S. Hispanic population: seniors

Latino Boomers (those born between 1946 and 1964) represent approximately 10% of the U.S. Boomer segment – over 7 million consumers – but cannot be segmented by language alone, a Focalyst study concludes.

“Marketers need to look beyond language and understand the demographic, attitudinal and behavioral differences within the Latino Boomer market in order to reach this target,” said Jack Lett, executive director of Focalyst.

Two in three Hispanic Boomers are “more acculturated,” considered either “Bicultural” or “Acculturated” :

•Bicultural Hispanics – 24% of Latino Boomers – are US-born or foreign-born and have lived many years in the US; they are bilingual and consume both English and Spanish media; they identify with aspects of both cultures.

•Acculturated Hispanics – 41% – are US-born and English-dominant; they consume English media; and they identify strongly with American culture, but still keep ties with their Hispanic culture.

•Unacculturated Hispanics – 35% – are foreign-born and speak Spanish in the home; they consume more Spanish than non-Spanish media; and they identify strongly with their native culture.

Understanding Latino Boomers: Demographic Profile

The study found that Bicultural Hispanic Boomers…

•Earn 23% less income on average than General Market Boomers ($56,607 compared with $73,921) – though they are equally likely to be employed (77%).

•Are slightly more likely to be married or partnered (75%) than both Acculturated (64%) and General Market Boomers (69%).

•Are less likely to be college educated – 55% of them have a college education, compared with 69% of Acculturated Boomers and 73% of General Market Boomers.

Understanding Latino Boomers: Family

Hispanic Boomers live in larger households (3.3 people per household vs. 2.9 for the General Market), often made up of younger children, adult children, or older relatives. Bicultural households have the largest household composition (3.6 people):

In addition…

•Acculturated Boomers are the most likely to be a caregiver for a family member, with 14% recently taking on this role.

•Besides supporting larger households, one in four Latino Boomers are providing substantial financial support to someone outside of their homes.

Understanding Latino Boomers: Future Plans

Acculturated Latino Boomers are more likely to aspire to continue their education (28%), whereas Bicultural Hispanics have more entrepreneurial desires – 32% said they want to start a new business, compared with 17% of General Market Boomers:

More findings:

•More than half (51%) of Bicultural Latino Boomers said it is important that their family think they are doing well

•86% of Bicultural Hispanic Boomers agreed that they have been fortunate in life, and 80% said they have accomplished a great deal – more so than General Market (77%) and Acculturated (76%) Boomers.

Source: Marketing Charts

Uncovered Facts About Online Hispanic Women and their Media Usage

Are you considering going after the online Hispanic women market? Here’s all your questions on their online media usage answered but to find out you must read every word of this comprehensive report.

Online Hispanic women are social networking butterflies

Online Hispanic women are social networking butterflies

One of the main factors that decisively affects business profitability and ROI is market share. The connection between market share and profitability has been recognized by scholars, business executives and consultants.

Hispanic women in the U.S will reach 51 million by 2050 and will make up 25% of the total U.S female population by 2050, according to Hispan Telligence.

If we add the fact that U.S. Hispanics are ahead of the curve when it comes to digital, they lead in adoption of new devices, are power users of mobile and over-index in video consumption, the conclusion is clear. It’s time to pay attention to the online Hispanic women market.

Hispanic women RULE in digital

Many brands believe that the only places to reach online Hispanic women are lifestyle magazines, celebrity gossip and mommy sites. While these sites are very effective in reaching them, Hispanic women trace their own path and can be found in other online properties in droves and we will cover these shortly. You just have to know where to look.

Check Out These Uncovered Facts About Online Hispanic Women and their Media Usage

Uncovered Facts About Online Hispanic Women and their Media Usage

Online Hispanic women are social networking butterflies

Hispanic women of all ages engage in a multitude of online activities, such as blogging, photo-sharing, gaming, video viewing and instant messaging. Mobile social networking is a habitual practice in the lives of today’s women.

Social retail, clearly demonstrated by the percentage of women that participate on Pinterest and because it combines two activities that are already firmly embedded in the daily activity of online women, is the next logical step in this evolution.

Women transact online more than men

In the U.S., currently the largest e-commerce market in the world, women are the key drivers of online buying. More women than men conduct business online and, collectively, they spend more. Women account for 85% of consumer purchases (She-conomy) and 58% of U.S. ecommerce spend but in spite of this, 91% of women say advertisers don’t understand them.

Differences between women and men on Social Networks

Even when their online behavior is similar, motivations can differ widely between the two genders. The adoption of Twitter is a great example – both genders adopted this technology at similar rates, but for different purposes. Men are far more likely to post their own Tweets than women. Meanwhile, a larger percentage of female Twitter users say they use the site to find deals and promotions. Women are also more likely to use the service as a conversation medium, to ask for help from other users and to follow celebrities. (comScore)

Online Hispanic Women Social Media and Other Web Media Use

Girls dominate visual platforms - Pew Internet 2015

Girls dominate visual platforms – Pew Internet 2015

Social Media Networks with the largest incidence of Hispanic demographics are Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest.

Facebook

73% of adult Latino internet users (18+ years old) say they have a Facebook account with a slightly higher Hispanic women presence in the social network. (Pew Research Center 2014)

Twitter

25% of Hispanics are on Twitter versus a 21% of non-Hispanic whites. The site’s reach is marginally higher among men than among women. Still, this is a great network to reach a college-educated, affluent, and urbanite demographic.

Instagram, Flickr, Other Photo Sharing Sites

Hispanic women surpass men in every age group in both reach and time spent on photo sites. They were also much faster to adopt photo sharing when it first reached the market.

SnapChat tends to be used by wealthier teenagers - Pew Internet 9-4-15

SnapChat tends to be used by wealthier teenagers – Pew Internet 9-4-15

Instagram has the largest percentage of Hispanics out of all other social networks. 34% of Instagram users are Hispanics, a much higher percentage than their white counterpart (21%). This demographic skews much younger, especially in the 18 to 29 years old segment. Besides young adults, women are particularly likely to be on Instagram, along with those who live in urban or suburban environments.

Pinterest

Pinterest does not fall behind on the Hispanic forefront. Definitely the Queendom of women, with 21% of Hispanic Pinterest users, looking for inspiration, this is “the” place to be. The first social commerce network (I really hate calling it a social network as Pinterest has always been so much more than that and by the way, don’t miss out on these outstanding Pinterest for Business statistics when you are done reading this article. If you are not active on it, you will want to be.)

To sum up: Women dominate Pinterest with 42% of online women using the platform, compared with 13% of online men.

SnapChat

Did you know that 70% of SnapChat users are women? And they are a very young demographic. Now, let’s do the math. There’s a much higher incidence of Hispanics on Gen Y and Gen Z than on any other generation. If you have not considered a SnapChat campaign for your Latina teens, you may be missing the mark.

Read What Everybody Ought To Know about the Latino market to discover even more

LinkedIn

LinkedIn seems to rank low on Hispanic demographics with just an 18 percent of adult Hispanics but if you are looking for online Hispanic women who are college-graduates and between the ages 30-64, then this is your site.

Remember that users are becoming more and more multiplatform and if you find them on Pinterest, it is highly likely you will also find them on Twitter and Facebook.

Source: September 2014, the Pew Research Center

Online Video Sites

59% of all Hispanics are on YouTube and 72% of Hispanic Americans using YouTube’s app. By the same token, YouTube has the higher share of viewed minutes for online women.

Universal has a Universal Latino YouTube channel dedicated channel to online Hispanics. You can read more about their success in driving this audience on this article.

Online Streaming

Latinos stream way more online TV than their white counterparts, according to Nielsen: “Latinos on average watch 6 hours and 22 minutes of online video per month, whereas white viewers clock 3 hours and 44 minutes on average.”

There are several players in this field.

Hulu Latino, has been developing its own original content. Hulu Original Latino Series ‘East Los High’ Receives Three Daytime Emmy Nominations. They are partners with Univision, Galavision and Telefutura. In 2012, Hulu Latino added shows from new partners Azteca America, Butaca, Caracol Televisión, Comarex, Estrella TV, Imagina US, Laguna Productions, Maya Entertainment, RCTV, Todobebe Inc and Venevision.

MiTu Latino is a multi-channel streaming network that receives over 100 million views per month and in just two years it amassed an audience of more than 36 million subscribers.

mun2, re-branded as NBC Universo on February 1, 2015, was the fastest growing Hispanic cable network with women 18-49 in total day Monday -Sunday 6a.m.- 2a.m., +8% year-over-year.  The network continued its double-digit growth with women. Source: Nielsen Media Research.

Radio

We cannot skip online radio, so we’ll take a look at the Pandora demographics. These are mostly Hispanics Males/Females younger than 24yrs old no college, some grad school, income range $0 – 55k, no kids. This is a very young demographic.

Hispanic Women and Online Search

Language used by Hispanic women to surf the web

Language used by Latinas to surf the web

“Latinas search in English for information in Spanish. Beyond language, a majority (62 percent) of Latinas wish for more lifestyle information about Latinas online, and over sixty percent want more lifestyle information written in Spanish. When Latinas search for Latino subject matter online, recipes top the list, followed by news, music, family health, beauty and celebrations.” Source: Comscore

Google is the most popular search engine among both genders but their behavior on Bing displays an interesting behavioral twist. In general, men perform a higher number of search queries than women (71.6 searches per searcher for men vs. 64.0 for women). When it comes down to Bing, Hispanic women perform a much higher number of searches than males that use this search engine do.

Google has seen the number of Google search queries that include common Spanish-language question words nearly double over the past 3 years. If you still think of “Hispanic Marketing” as “Spanish Marketing,” it’s time to re-evaluate your knowledge of this market. Looking for Spanish SEO or Spanish Inbound marketing will not help you capture a solid market share of the Hispanic market in the U.S., unless you only want to target this particular Hispanic market segment. But remember that even people who have recently immigrated to the U.S. will eventually be searching in English, Spanish and Spanglish.

Combine cultural relevance with language to get to the winning formula. – Havi Goffan

Why you need a Hispanic Inbound Marketing Agency

Hispanic Women market Opportunities & Challenges

I wouldn’t end this article without providing some tips and data regarding the Hispanic women market. Here are a few of the market’s opportunities and challenges.

Opportunities

  • Once a brand is identified as a trustworthy one, Hispanic women will share the news with family, friends, co-workers and this might lead these reference groups to continue the buzz about the brand around their own set of groups.
  • Customer relationship management is another important aspect to consider when marketing to Hispanics. Both from a cultural and language perspectives, this audience deserves careful consideration. The last thing a business should do is generate interest in their products or services to lose them once they form part of the customer-base.
  • Coupons have an influence on the Latino consumer’s decision.
  • Latina Bloggers have a strong influence in the purchasing decisions of many Hispanic moms.
  • 33% of Hispanic moms claim to have learned more about products and brands from online ads than from traditional media. Don’t forget internet ads!
  • Hispanic women are also more open to companies’ content: 57% said they read emails from brands while only 19% of U.S. moms do so.

Challenges

  • Brand loyalty towards one brand vs. another is very strong in some industries – e.g., the baby care industry. It may be based on brands used by previous generations or it built out of a product trial.
  • Hispanic women email lists need to be built in-house. Otherwise, be prepared to pay heftily for a solid list.
  • Trust generation is one of the most important achievements when targeting the Hispanic women market.

This audience IS the future. Play it smart and play it well. If you were doing business in China, you wouldn’t leave your marketing in the hands of people who knew nothing about the language and the culture, right? And there’s even more variations of Spanish than versions of Chinese. Don’t blame the market for not responding to your campaigns. The numbers are there and they are yours for the taking.

Words to live by

Words to live by

Next Quote? funny inspirational quotes on every post!

Why Marketers Should Care About Reaching Latina Bloggers

Speaking about Latina Bloggers is Elianne Ramos is the principal and CEO of Speak Hispanic Communications and vice-chair of Communications and PR for LATISM.

Elianne Ramos is the principal and CEO of Speak Hispanic Communications and vice-chair of Communications and PR for LATISM.

The first gift of the season goes to my dear friend, Elianne Ramos.:)  Elianne is an incredibly talented, knowledgeable, and hard working human being, she is the Principal & CEO of Speak Hispanic communications and vice-chair of Communications and PR for Latinos in Social Media (LATISM.) She is constantly on the go, generating great ideas and positively impacting the U.S. community. As if this wasn’t enough, she was the vice president, creative director and founder of i3 Creative Group, managing production teams working concurrently in the United States, Mexico, Uruguay and Argentina. In over 15 years of  creative direction, copy writing, public speaking, public relations and TV commercial production experience, Elianne has developed broadcast, multimedia and social media campaigns for high-profile clients. Her writing has appeared in numerous books and publications including the Chicken Soup for the Soul series and now, for the first time-ever, on the Hispanic Marketing blog.

Please, enjoy Elianne’s article. Elianne, this one is with all of the Target Latino love.

Why Marketers Should Care About Reaching Latina Bloggers

Even with the well-documented explosion of the Hispanic market, Internet sources like Technorati, which by 2008 was indexing 112.8 million blogs, have never touched upon the topic of Latinas and blogging. With the release of the Latinos in Social Media’s Latina Blogger Survey, though, it is now official: Latina bloggers are increasing their numbers and spreading throughout the blogosphere.

The intrinsic characteristics of blogging, where the private becomes public and communities rally together around common interests, make it the perfect platform for Latinas to voice life from their viewpoint … in in two languages, no less!

Beyond the obviously good news that these bloggers now provide us with a new outlet for furthering our brands’ messages—what with ever-shrinking minority-outreach budgets—the implications of this Latina blogger explosion for PR and marketing professionals are many:

The Good

• In Latino culture, where word-of-mouth and group interaction are second-nature, the trustworthiness of a blog post wrapped in a culturally relevant package can certainly influence the value of a brand in the eyes of their thousands of followers.

• These bloggers provide us with micro-niche audiences and more targeted outlets for furthering our brands’ messages. Stories published and promoted online have the potential to reach a greater number of people in very little time. In this context, a Latina blogger outreach program puts us in an ideal position to secure widespread coverage for our clients.

• Most Latinas blog in English, followed closely by Spanish and peppered with Spanglish, which means that their potential reach is amplified. Their choice of language in this case may be more about connecting with their readership, not necessarily a reflection of the language they speak more fluently. The key is listening and doing your homework in order to find the perfect fit.

• Latina bloggers are actively engaged in social media, and they tend to belong to tight, supportive communities online. Besides the fact that your message will reach well beyond the scope of the blog, this also means that other influencers in their communities will help disseminate it.

• Their culture infuses their writing but does not rule it.  Contrary to expectations, Latinas blog about numerous subjects, which opens up possibilities for different types of brand engagement.

• These Latinas are at the epicenter of merging worlds: between traditional and modern roles, between English and Spanish, between American and Latino cultures. They will bring a fresh perspective to your message, one that most closely reflects the Latina experience in the US.

The Bad

• Brand credibility: With consumers now doing research online and even generating their own content, consumers are less likely to believe a product review that blatantly comes from a sponsorship.

• Relative lack of control over the message: Know that consumers will be getting and act on impressions about your brand from less than perfect sources. Bloggers are not necessarily a self-regulating bunch, at least not yet. The fact that they can and will write whatever they want in their blog might create public relations issues. Just be sure to monitor their blogs, so you can address any issues or comments and give your official brand perspective, if need be.

• Saturation: With the fast growth rate of this segment, the Latina blogger market is likely to become saturated fast, which means their individual reach will, at some point and with few exceptions, start to diminish. This being a relatively young blogging community also means that the time to reach out to them is now.

The Ugly

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is cracking down on so-called “Blogola” by regulating blogger/advertiser relationships. The rules were updated December 2009.

The new rules include the fact that now bloggers must disclose material connections with a brand: whether they are receiving payment or free products and the kind of relationship they have with the company. What’s more, now both the brand and the blogger are subject to liability for misleading or unsubstantiated representations made. This means that the potential of a company being held responsible for approving unfounded claims—not rare in this realm—is a very real one. While the FTC regulations are beginning to be applied, the blogger outreach game is still an evolving one. The main things to keep in mind seem to be transparency, clear objectives and open ears: a willingness to listen and adjust, if need be.

Though a blogging campaign may be a godsend of great, relatively inexpensive publicity, remember that it is also —or should be—part of a larger communications/PR plan. Make sure all other elements of the campaign support your Latina blogging outreach and vice versa. If you do it right, Latina blogueras will rally behind your efforts with the same pasión they pour into their Web writing every day.

What has been your experience in reaching out to Latina bloggers? Please share in the comments below.

inspirational quote

inspirational quote

Cell Phone Is Single Females’ New Best Friend

Some 12% of females surveyed said that they would be less likely to date someone if they had a big and bulky cell phone | Single mobile females all you Wanted to Know

Some 12% of females surveyed said that they would be less likely to date someone if they had a big and bulky cell phone

Single mobile females (SMFs) – young single women who have cell phones – assign to their mobile devices an important role in relationships and dating, organizing their lives, and in fashion, according to a recent study commissioned by Samsung Telecommunications America.

“The cell phone is an integral part of the SMF’s life, serving as a pocket-size detective, matchmaker, wing-woman and beyond. It is now officially a girl’s best friend,” said Randy Smith, VP of channel marketing for Samsung.

Single mobile females all you Wanted to Know

Among the survey findings:

Single mobile females all you Wanted to Know

Single mobile females all you Wanted to Know

  • More than two-thirds of women (73%) of women have ditched traditional, paper address books for their cell phones to keep track of contacts.
  • The average number of cell phone contacts is 63.
  • Almost one-third of respondents said they can tell a good amount about a person by the type of cell phone they have (32%).
  • Some 12% of females surveyed said that they would be less likely to date someone if they had a big and bulky cell phone.
  • Nearly three-quarters of females surveyed look at their cell phone, rather than their watch, to get the time (74%).
  • More than one out of three SMFs have had a friend call them to interrupt a date (34%).
  • A whopping 70% said they have snooped on their significant other’s cell phone – for example, by looking through text messages or picking up their phone to see who is calling.
  • Single mobile females use cell phones to avoid calls: 40% have faked technical difficulties to avoid someone they were not interested in dating.
  • Nearly four out of ten (39%) single women have suffered from “text shame:” sending a text message and then waking up the next morning realizing that they said something they shouldn’t have.
  • Nearly half of survey respondents prefer to flirt with someone they are interested in via text message when they are away from them (48%).
  • More than 10% of females surveyed say the “three day rule” – waiting to call someone until three days after a first date – only applies to calling, and one can send a text message to someone before day three (13%).
  • 78% of females surveyed prefer to give their cell phone number to someone they are attracted to.

About the study: The survey, commissioned by Samsung, was conducted by Kelton Research and included more than 500 US unmarried females ages 18 to 35 who have a cell phone.

word

word

Hispanics Create More than Half of Food Growth

Hispanics accounted for 57.7% of sales growth in the food, beverage and restaurant sector.

Hispanics accounted for 57.7% of sales growth in the food, beverage and restaurant sector.

In addition to being the largest driver of college enrollment growth, Hispanics have also become the most important U.S. demographic growth driver in the food, beverage and restaurant sectors, according to data from a Hispanic market research study.

The U.S. Hispanic segment made up more than 50% of real U.S. food, beverage and restaurant growth between 2005 and 2008, generating $52 billion of new inflation-adjusted spending. In contrast, non-Hispanics generated $40 billion of new inflation adjusted spending during the same period. This means that between 2005 and 2008, Hispanics accounted for 57.7% of sales growth in the food, beverage and restaurant sector.

The analysis indicates this growth can be attributed primarily to an increase in the number of U.S. Hispanic households, and secondly to an increase in consumer spending among U.S. Hispanics (which should likely continue rising as more Hispanics obtain college degrees and increase their earning potential).

Source: Latinum

Yoda wisdom

Yoda wisdom

U.S. Illegal Immigrant Population Down

The number of illegal immigrants in the U.S. declined by one million since its peak in 2007

The number of illegal immigrants living in the U.S. dropped by one million people in two years, according to new estimates by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Government officials believe 10.8 million illegal immigrants lived in the country in Jan. 2009, down from a peak of nearly 12 million in 2007. If the official estimates are correct, not since 2005 has the population of illegal immigrants been as low as it was last year. The report, produced annually since 2005, is the government’s official tabulation of immigrants living here illegally.
Source: Poder360

Inside Hispanic America

by Claudia “Havi” Goffan

Winner of the Publisher’s Multicultural Award Category: Best Multicultural Awareness Article

What is life like in America for Hispanic Americans?  What are their thoughts and concerns about family, employment, education, religion, opportunities, and healthcare?  We asked Claudia Goffan, founder of Target Latino, an Atlanta based marketing and consulting firm specializing in the Hispanic market, to provide “The College World Reporter” readers with her own views from inside Hispanic America. Here is our interview:

Claudia "Havi" Goffan - Hispanic Marketing Expert and CEO of Target Latino

Claudia “Havi” Goffan – Hispanic Marketing Expert and CEO of Target Latino

Q.Could you give us an inside look at Hispanic or Latino life?

A. To fully understand the Hispanic market, you need to analyze it by country of origin, level of acculturation, age, sex, marital status and educational level. Although some generalizations can be made, they have to be understood as such and not as an answer to comprehending the culture.

Let’s talk about some of the generalizations about the Hispanic culture. The very first one that comes to mind is about family being the first priority, the children are celebrated and sheltered and the wife usually fulfills a domestic role. Hispanics have a long Roman Catholic tradition and this usually implies quite a fatalistic outlook where destiny is in the hands of God. Latin American educational system is based on emphasis on the theoretical, memorization and a rigid and very broad curriculum. It follows the French schooling system and it translates into people who are generalists and look at the big picture as opposed to specialists, like in the U.S. Hispanics are highly nationalistic, very proud of long history and traditions.

Hispanics have difficulty separating work and personal relationships and are sensitive to differences of opinion. Hispanics fear loss of face, especially publicly and shun confrontation, where truth is tempered by the need for diplomacy. Title and position are more important than money in the eyes of Hispanic society. Etiquette and manners are seen as a measure of breeding and it follows an “old world” formality. Dress and grooming are status symbols whereas in the U.S. appearance is secondary to performance. The aesthetic side of life is important even at work.

Q. Tell us about the purchasing power of the U.S. Hispanics?

A. According to the University of Georgia’s Selig Center for Economic Growth in 2004 the nation’s largest minority group controlled $686 billion in spending. The community’s purchasing power comprises the world’s ninth biggest economy and it’s larger than the GNP of Brazil, Spain or Mexico. Hispanic purchasing power is projected to reach as much as $1 trillion by next year (2010) being the main drivers of the surge in Hispanic consumer influence the increasing education levels, labor force composition, household characteristics and accumulation of wealth. The fastest-growing occupational categories for Hispanics are higher paying managerial and professional jobs.

Q. What about Hispanics’ Healthcare Access?

A. I will quote a new analysis by the Pew Hispanic Center that indicates that six-in-ten Hispanic adults living in the United States who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents lack health insurance. According to this same study, the share of uninsured among this group (60%) is much higher than the share of uninsured among Latino adults who are legal permanent residents or citizens (28%), or among the adult population of the United States (17%). Hispanic adults who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents tend to be younger and healthier than the adult U.S. population and are less likely than other groups to have a regular health care provider. Just 57% say there is a place they usually go when they are sick or need advice about their health, compared with 76% of Latino adults who are citizens or legal permanent residents and 83% of the adult U.S. population.

Overall, four-in-ten (41%) non-citizen, non-legal permanent resident Hispanics state that their usual provider is a community clinic or health center. These centers are designed primarily as “safety nets” for vulnerable populations and are funded by a variety of sources, including the federal government, state governments and private foundations, as well as reimbursements from patients, based upon a sliding scale (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2008).

Six out of 10 Hispanics are U.S.-born - Inside Hispanic America

Six out of 10 Hispanics are U.S.-born – Inside Hispanic America

The study also reports that some 37% of Latino adults who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents have no usual health care provider. More than one-fourth (28%) of the people in this group indicate that financial limitations prevent them from having a usual provider – 17% report that their lack of insurance is the primary reason, while 12% cite high medical costs in general. However, a majority (56%) say they do not have a usual provider because they simply do not need one. An additional 5% state that difficulty in navigating the U.S. health care system prevents them from having a usual provider. According to Pew Hispanic Center estimates, 11.9 million undocumented immigrants were living in the U.S. in 2008. Three-quarters (76%) of these undocumented immigrants were Latinos.

Regarding health status, the study reports that the Latino population in the U.S. is relatively young, and Latino adults who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents are younger still. Some 43% of adult Latinos who are not citizens or legal permanent residents are younger than age 30, compared with 27% of Hispanic adults who are citizens or legal permanent residents and 22% of the adult U.S. population.  The youthfulness of this population contributes to its relative healthiness.

About the Hispanic experiences in the Health Care System, the Pew reports that three-fourths (76%) of Latino adults who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents report that the quality of medical care they received in the past year was excellent or good. This is similar to the proportion of adult Latino citizens and legal permanent residents (78%) who express satisfaction with their recent health care. However, when asked a separate question – whether they had received any poor medical treatment in the past five years – adult Latinos who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents are less likely (16%) to report any problems than are Latinos who are citizens or legal permanent residents (24%).

Among those Latinos who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents who report receiving poor medical treatment in the past five years, a plurality (46%) state that they believed their accent or the way they spoke English contributed to that poor care. A similar share (43%) believed that their inability to pay for care contributed to their poor treatment. More than one-third (37%) felt that their race or ethnicity played a part in their poor care, and one-fourth (25%) attributed the unsatisfactory treatment to something in their medical history.

Q. What is the difference in viewpoint between young Hispanics or Latinos born and raised in the United States, and their older parents or grandparents who migrated to the U.S. from other countries?

A. The one difference that applies to all Latinos existent between non and semi-acculturated Hispanics and fully-acculturated or U.S. born Hispanics (young or old) is that whereas the non and semi-acculturated Latinos are trying to learn how to navigate the American culture, the U.S. born Hispanics or fully-acculturated know how to navigate the American culture and “learn” to navigate the Hispanic one from their family.

Q. Who are people on the rise in the Hispanic or Latino community that may become corporate leaders, or the next Sonia Sotomayor?

A. There are many Hispanics on the rise in every walk of life in the United States. Some people may not even notice of their Hispanic background because it usually comes to light when there are political issues at stake. For example, a currently retired doctor that was the Director of Cardiology of the St. Joseph’s Hospital in Atlanta was originally from Argentina. The creative that many years ago came up with the successful campaign for a drug that put the country to sleep is a Nuyorican (Puerto Rican born in New York).

Regarding known Latinos on the rise, you may want to keep an eye on Christine Arguello, Judge, U.S. District Court, Colorado; Emiliano Calemzuk, President, Fox Television Studios; Ignacia Moreno, Counsel, Corporate Environmental Programs, General Electric Company; Esther Salas, U.S. Magistrate Judge, District of New Jersey; Thomas Saenz, President and General Counsel, Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund (MALDEF); Hilda Solis, Secretary of Labor; Rosa Gumatatotao Rios, United States Treasurer; Elena Rios, President & CEO, National Hispanic Medical Foundation; Enrique Conterno; President, Eli Lilly, USA and Edward Chavez, Justice, the State of New Mexico Supreme Court, among many others.

Q. What should everyone know about Hispanics or Latinos?

A. The first thing that comes to mind is the very little known fact that 6 out of 10 Latinos are U.S. born.  The second one is that the younger the generation, the higher the percentage of Hispanics in it. It is imperative to understand the new U.S. demographics when developing business strategies, city planning, new products, etc.

About Claudia Goffan: Recognized as an expert in Latino Marketing by CNN en Español, Claudia has been featured in Adweek, Hispanic Business, Univision, Telemundo and other national and international media.

A native from Buenos Aires, Argentina, Claudia has been very influential in the Hispanic markets in the U.S. and Latin America – both from a business and a community standpoint – always with outstanding results. Claudia has contributed to companies such as, The Occasions Group, The Taylor Corporation, El Banco de Nuestra Comunidad (A division of SunTrust Bank), XEROX, AT&T, BellSouth, Citibank, Papa John’s, Liberty Mutual, British Telecom, Gold’s Gym, Sherwin Williams, and Verizon, among others.

A motivator, strategic and hands-on, innovative, creative and resourceful. It has been said that her humor and presence immediately captivate audiences. She has an MBA from the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina and from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), and more than 20 years specializing in Marketing and Strategic Planning both internationally and domestically. She is bilingual and bicultural in English and Spanish and fluent in Portuguese, French, and Italian.

About Target Latino: Target Latino was founded in 2003, with a vision unparalleled at the time – to show American companies the importance of the U.S. Hispanic market – not by preaching but by acting. Target Latino is a marketing consulting firm specializing in the Hispanic market and inbound strategies.  Target Latino has a long standing experience of driving results in tough economic times.  Target Latino is minority owned, and a percentage of its proceeds go to different charity causes.

So true. Great Quotes

Great quote

Understanding Latino Boomers

Understanding Latino Boomers

Understanding Latino Boomers

Focalyst, a reseach firm specialized in seniors and boomers, presented the results of a new study that provides valuable insights on one of the most complex segments of the U.S. Hispanic population: seniors

Latino Boomers (those born between 1946 and 1964) represent approximately 10% of the U.S. Boomer segment – over 7 million consumers – but cannot be segmented by language alone, a Focalyst study concludes.

“Marketers need to look beyond language and understand the demographic, attitudinal and behavioral differences within the Latino Boomer market in order to reach this target,” said Jack Lett, executive director of Focalyst.

Two in three Hispanic Boomers are “more acculturated,” considered either “Bicultural” or “Acculturated” :

•Bicultural Hispanics – 24% of Latino Boomers – are US-born or foreign-born and have lived many years in the US; they are bilingual and consume both English and Spanish media; they identify with aspects of both cultures.

•Acculturated Hispanics – 41% – are US-born and English-dominant; they consume English media; and they identify strongly with American culture, but still keep ties with their Hispanic culture.

•Unacculturated Hispanics – 35% – are foreign-born and speak Spanish in the home; they consume more Spanish than non-Spanish media; and they identify strongly with their native culture.

Understanding Latino Boomers: Demographic Profile

The study found that Bicultural Hispanic Boomers…

•Earn 23% less income on average than General Market Boomers ($56,607 compared with $73,921) – though they are equally likely to be employed (77%).

•Are slightly more likely to be married or partnered (75%) than both Acculturated (64%) and General Market Boomers (69%).

•Are less likely to be college educated – 55% of them have a college education, compared with 69% of Acculturated Boomers and 73% of General Market Boomers.

Understanding Latino Boomers: Family

Hispanic Boomers live in larger households (3.3 people per household vs. 2.9 for the General Market), often made up of younger children, adult children, or older relatives. Bicultural households have the largest household composition (3.6 people):

In addition…

•Acculturated Boomers are the most likely to be a caregiver for a family member, with 14% recently taking on this role.

•Besides supporting larger households, one in four Latino Boomers are providing substantial financial support to someone outside of their homes.

Understanding Latino Boomers: Future Plans

Acculturated Latino Boomers are more likely to aspire to continue their education (28%), whereas Bicultural Hispanics have more entrepreneurial desires – 32% said they want to start a new business, compared with 17% of General Market Boomers:

More findings:

•More than half (51%) of Bicultural Latino Boomers said it is important that their family think they are doing well

•86% of Bicultural Hispanic Boomers agreed that they have been fortunate in life, and 80% said they have accomplished a great deal – more so than General Market (77%) and Acculturated (76%) Boomers.

Source: Marketing Charts

First Bilingual Educational Toy Brand, Ingenio(TM), Hits the U.S. Market

Alpharetta, Ga.-based Smart Play, LLC has launched Ingenio(TM), the first entirely bilingual educational toy brand and games in the United States. The product line features 10 portable, affordable toys and games that teach a comprehensive range of early learning skills in English and Spanish – fine motor, reading, writing, math, vocabulary, geography and problem solving.

First Bilingual Educational Toy Brand, Ingenio(TM), Hits the U.S. Market

First Bilingual Educational Toy Brand, Ingenio(TM), Hits the U.S. Market

Ingenio’s bilingual product line ranges from electronic learning toys and puzzles to educational games. All products emphasize English and Spanish equally to enable the child to learn a second language easily. The light-weight, travel-friendly products offer children dynamic, “unplugged” playtime, free from the chain-and-drain of a computer or television.

Unlocking a world of opportunities, Ingenio helps preschool and grade school children (ages 3-8 years) learn both languages in the context of fun. Smart Play’s products are bilingual by design(TM) to facilitate learning at an early age, which research indicates is the prime time for language acquisition.

The proven benefits of bilingualism include greater cognitive flexibility, improved powers of concept formation and enhanced creativity. Spanish is the second-most prominent language in the country, and nearly 25 percent of all U.S. children between the ages of 3 and 6 are of Hispanic origin (a number that is quickly on the rise). This makes Ingenio an ingenious tool to form future leaders.

“Finally, a foreign-language educational toy company!” said Liza Sanchez, founder of Escuela Bilingüe Internacional, in response to Ingenio. “As a parent, I am thrilled to finally be able to provide toys that represent our home language. As a teacher, I have been looking for years for products that can help my young students advance their Spanish education both in and outside of the classroom. The cognitive and social benefits of becoming bilingual have made many parents realize the importance of learning a second language.”

In addition to recognition from educational leaders, Ingenio has already garnered accolades from the toy industry. Ingenio recently received the 2009 Dr. Toy’s Best Vacation Product and Creative Child Magazine 2009 Top Toy of the Year.

Not only is Ingenio innovative and educational but also budget-friendly. Eight of the 10 products are less than $ 15 and all products are available at Amazon.com and will soon be available at Toys “R” Us.com.

About Smart Play

Smart Play provides safe, affordable, innovative and educational products to enrich your child’s mind. Play is the perfect way to reinforce and extend the skills children learn at home and at school. Many of our products are designed to grow with your child by offering age-appropriate activities with progressive levels of difficulty.

For more information about Ingenio products, please visit our bilingual site: www.smartplay.us.

Source: Smart Play, LLC

Hispanic Immigrants’ Children Fall Behind Peers Early, Study Finds

A great example of a study (or its interpretation) that misleads readers. This is a problem that stems from poverty and parents with a low educational level. This is definitely not related to the parent’s immigration status. Children from Hispanic immigrants whose parents have a very high level of education do even better than their American counterpart. Feel free to comment.

Claudia Goffan

Here is the article:

The children of Hispanic immigrants tend to be born healthy and start life on an intellectual par with other American children, but by the age of 2 they begin to lag in linguistic and cognitive skills, a new study by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, shows.

Hispanic Immigrants’ Children Fall Behind Peers Early, Study Finds

Hispanic Immigrants’ Children Fall Behind Peers Early, Study Finds

The study highlights a paradox that has bedeviled educators and Hispanic families for some time. By and large, mothers from Latin American countries take care of their health during their pregnancies and give birth to robust children, but those children fall behind their peers in mental development by the time they reach grade school, and the gap tends to widen as they get older.

The new Berkeley study suggests the shortfall may start even before the children enter preschool, supporting calls in Washington to spend more on programs that coach parents to stimulate their children with books, drills and games earlier in their lives.

“Our results show a very significant gap even at age 3,” said Bruce Fuller, one of the study’s authors and a professor of education at Berkeley. “If we don’t attack this disparity early on, these kids are headed quickly for a pretty dismal future in elementary school.”

Professor Fuller said blacks and poor whites also lagged behind the curve, suggesting that poverty remained a factor in predicting how well a young mind develops. But the drop-off in the cognitive scores of Hispanic toddlers, especially those from Mexican backgrounds, was steeper than for other groups and could not be explained by economic status alone, he said.

One possible explanation is that a high percentage of Mexican and Latin American immigrant mothers have less formal schooling than the average American mother, white or black, the study’s authors said. These mothers also tend to have more children than middle-class American families, which means the toddlers get less one-on-one attention from their parents.

“The reading activities, educational games and performing the ABCs for Grandma — so often witnessed in middle-class homes — are less consistently seen in poor Latino households,” Professor Fuller said.

The study is based on data collected on 8,114 infants born in 2001 and tracked through the first two years of life by the National Center for Education Statistics. The findings will be published this week in Maternal and Child Health Journal, and a companion report will appear this fall in the medical journal Pediatrics.

The analysis showed that at 9 to 15 months, Hispanic and white children performed equally on tests of basic cognitive skills, like understanding their mother’s speech and using words and gestures. But from 24 to 36 months, the Hispanic children fell about six months behind their white peers on measures like word comprehension, more complex speech and working with their mothers on simple tasks.

The study comes as the Obama administration has been pushing for more money to help prepare infants and toddlers for school. In September, the House passed an initiative that would channel $8 billion over eight years to states with plans to improve programs serving young children.

In addition, the economic stimulus package included $3 billion for Head Start preschools and for the Early Head Start program, which helps young parents stimulate their children’s mental development.

Eugene Garcia, an education professor at Arizona State University, said the Berkeley-led study confirmed findings by others that the children of Hispanic immigrants, for reasons that remain unclear, tend to fall behind white students by as much as a grade level by the third grade.

“It seems like what might be the most helpful with Latino kids is early intervention,” Dr. Garcia said.

Carmen Rodriguez, the director of the Columbia University Head Start in New York City, said there was a waiting list of parents, most of them Hispanic, who want to take Early Head Start classes with their children.

Dr. Rodriguez said the study’s findings might reflect a surge in interest in early childhood education on the part of middle-class Americans, rather than any deficiency in the immigrant homes.

“Any low-income toddler is disadvantaged if they don’t get this kind of stimulation,” she said.

Source: The New York Times – By James McKinley Jr.

Hispanics Preparing for Retirement Face Significant Challenges

New Study Reveals Significant Challenges Hispanic Americans Face in Preparing for Retirement

New Study Reveals Significant Challenges Hispanic Americans Face in Preparing for Retirement

A new report released today demonstrates that Hispanic Americans face greater challenges in obtaining a secure retirement than the average population. The paper, prepared by the Hispanic Institute think-tank and the Americans for Secure Retirement (ASR) coalition, finds that the unique challenges include a general lack of retirement preparation, less access to employer-sponsored retirement plans, lower levels of personal savings and inadequate financial literacy.

The report concludes that Hispanic Americans need to consider multiple retirement vehicles to supplement Social Security and to bridge the gap in access to employer plans. Options such as lifetime annuities can minimize financial risks and provide the means to both build retirement savings and secure guaranteed income that will last as long as they live. Access to such a source of guaranteed lifetime income to supplement Social Security is a critical part of planning for a secure retirement.

“While our research found that Hispanics face greater challenges in preparing for retirement than the average population, with the right tools to properly prepare for retirement, these obstacles can be overcome,” said Gus West, Board of Directors Chair for Hispanic Institute.

Significant findings of the study include:

  • Only 41 percent of Hispanic workers say they have saved money for retirement.
  • Only 25.6 percent of Hispanics are covered by employer-sponsored retirement plans, compared to 42.5 percent of whites and 40 percent of African-Americans.
  • Of the Hispanics receiving Social Security benefits, almost 80 percent rely on these benefits for at least 50 percent of their retirement earnings.
  • Among people 65 and older receiving Social Security, on average Hispanics receive about $2,124 less in earnings than non-Hispanics.

Between 1979 and 1999, middle-class Hispanics households increased nearly 80 percent. In the same period, the group of Hispanic households earnings between $40,000 to $140,000 grew to include about one-third of the total Hispanic households nationwide.

Today, the U.S. Hispanic population makes up about 48 million people; by 2050 that number will increase to 132 million, accounting for nearly 30 percent of the total U.S. population. Due to the growing Hispanic population, an average longer life expectancy, and because only 16 percent of the population is in their pre-retirement years, Hispanics will make up a significant number of those entering retirement in the future.

“Since two-thirds of Hispanics are employed in the service-related field, which generally does not offer employer-sponsored retirement plans, many hard working Hispanic Americans may not have the proper nest egg to retire. It is imperative that their savings are managed and invested in a secure plan that assures income for life,” said Brent Wilkes, Executive Director of League of United Latin American Citizens.

Legislation currently being considered in Congress would create tax advantages for the purchase of an annuity and the conversion of a portion of an individual’s savings into a lifetime retirement income stream. The Retirement Security Needs Lifetime Pay Act, H.R. 2748, in the U.S. House and the Retirement Security for Life Act, S. 1297, in the U.S. Senate, would create a tax exclude from taxes a portion of the annual income received through an annuity, increasing accessibility to lifetime annuities as a retirement option and creating significant tax savings for middle-income Americans.

“Congress needs to pass this legislation to encourage the greatest accessibility possibility to multiple retirement savings vehicles that tackle the income side of the retirement problem,” said Bill Waldie, Chairman of ASR.

The Hispanic Institute nonprofit organization formed in 2005 to provide an effective education forum for an informed and empowered Hispanic America. Americans for Secure Retirement is a broad-based coalition of more than 50 organizations who are united in their commitment to raise awareness of the retirement challenge facing all Americans.

To view the complete Hispanic and Retirement: Challenges and Opportunities report, please visit www.paycheckforlife.org.

SOURCE Americans for Secure Retirement