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Uncovered Facts About Online Hispanic Women and their Media Usage

Are you considering going after the online Hispanic women market? Here’s all your questions on their online media usage answered but to find out you must read every word of this comprehensive report.

Online Hispanic women are social networking butterflies

Online Hispanic women are social networking butterflies

One of the main factors that decisively affects business profitability and ROI is market share. The connection between market share and profitability has been recognized by scholars, business executives and consultants.

Hispanic women in the U.S will reach 51 million by 2050 and will make up 25% of the total U.S female population by 2050, according to Hispan Telligence.

If we add the fact that U.S. Hispanics are ahead of the curve when it comes to digital, they lead in adoption of new devices, are power users of mobile and over-index in video consumption, the conclusion is clear. It’s time to pay attention to the online Hispanic women market.

Hispanic women RULE in digital

Many brands believe that the only places to reach online Hispanic women are lifestyle magazines, celebrity gossip and mommy sites. While these sites are very effective in reaching them, Hispanic women trace their own path and can be found in other online properties in droves and we will cover these shortly. You just have to know where to look.

Check Out These Uncovered Facts About Online Hispanic Women and their Media Usage

Uncovered Facts About Online Hispanic Women and their Media Usage

Online Hispanic women are social networking butterflies

Hispanic women of all ages engage in a multitude of online activities, such as blogging, photo-sharing, gaming, video viewing and instant messaging. Mobile social networking is a habitual practice in the lives of today’s women.

Social retail, clearly demonstrated by the percentage of women that participate on Pinterest and because it combines two activities that are already firmly embedded in the daily activity of online women, is the next logical step in this evolution.

Women transact online more than men

In the U.S., currently the largest e-commerce market in the world, women are the key drivers of online buying. More women than men conduct business online and, collectively, they spend more. Women account for 85% of consumer purchases (She-conomy) and 58% of U.S. ecommerce spend but in spite of this, 91% of women say advertisers don’t understand them.

Differences between women and men on Social Networks

Even when their online behavior is similar, motivations can differ widely between the two genders. The adoption of Twitter is a great example – both genders adopted this technology at similar rates, but for different purposes. Men are far more likely to post their own Tweets than women. Meanwhile, a larger percentage of female Twitter users say they use the site to find deals and promotions. Women are also more likely to use the service as a conversation medium, to ask for help from other users and to follow celebrities. (comScore)

Online Hispanic Women Social Media and Other Web Media Use

Girls dominate visual platforms - Pew Internet 2015

Girls dominate visual platforms – Pew Internet 2015

Social Media Networks with the largest incidence of Hispanic demographics are Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest.

Facebook

73% of adult Latino internet users (18+ years old) say they have a Facebook account with a slightly higher Hispanic women presence in the social network. (Pew Research Center 2014)

Twitter

25% of Hispanics are on Twitter versus a 21% of non-Hispanic whites. The site’s reach is marginally higher among men than among women. Still, this is a great network to reach a college-educated, affluent, and urbanite demographic.

Instagram, Flickr, Other Photo Sharing Sites

Hispanic women surpass men in every age group in both reach and time spent on photo sites. They were also much faster to adopt photo sharing when it first reached the market.

SnapChat tends to be used by wealthier teenagers - Pew Internet 9-4-15

SnapChat tends to be used by wealthier teenagers – Pew Internet 9-4-15

Instagram has the largest percentage of Hispanics out of all other social networks. 34% of Instagram users are Hispanics, a much higher percentage than their white counterpart (21%). This demographic skews much younger, especially in the 18 to 29 years old segment. Besides young adults, women are particularly likely to be on Instagram, along with those who live in urban or suburban environments.

Pinterest

Pinterest does not fall behind on the Hispanic forefront. Definitely the Queendom of women, with 21% of Hispanic Pinterest users, looking for inspiration, this is “the” place to be. The first social commerce network (I really hate calling it a social network as Pinterest has always been so much more than that and by the way, don’t miss out on these outstanding Pinterest for Business statistics when you are done reading this article. If you are not active on it, you will want to be.)

To sum up: Women dominate Pinterest with 42% of online women using the platform, compared with 13% of online men.

SnapChat

Did you know that 70% of SnapChat users are women? And they are a very young demographic. Now, let’s do the math. There’s a much higher incidence of Hispanics on Gen Y and Gen Z than on any other generation. If you have not considered a SnapChat campaign for your Latina teens, you may be missing the mark.

Read What Everybody Ought To Know about the Latino market to discover even more

LinkedIn

LinkedIn seems to rank low on Hispanic demographics with just an 18 percent of adult Hispanics but if you are looking for online Hispanic women who are college-graduates and between the ages 30-64, then this is your site.

Remember that users are becoming more and more multiplatform and if you find them on Pinterest, it is highly likely you will also find them on Twitter and Facebook.

Source: September 2014, the Pew Research Center

Online Video Sites

59% of all Hispanics are on YouTube and 72% of Hispanic Americans using YouTube’s app. By the same token, YouTube has the higher share of viewed minutes for online women.

Universal has a Universal Latino YouTube channel dedicated channel to online Hispanics. You can read more about their success in driving this audience on this article.

Online Streaming

Latinos stream way more online TV than their white counterparts, according to Nielsen: “Latinos on average watch 6 hours and 22 minutes of online video per month, whereas white viewers clock 3 hours and 44 minutes on average.”

There are several players in this field.

Hulu Latino, has been developing its own original content. Hulu Original Latino Series ‘East Los High’ Receives Three Daytime Emmy Nominations. They are partners with Univision, Galavision and Telefutura. In 2012, Hulu Latino added shows from new partners Azteca America, Butaca, Caracol Televisión, Comarex, Estrella TV, Imagina US, Laguna Productions, Maya Entertainment, RCTV, Todobebe Inc and Venevision.

MiTu Latino is a multi-channel streaming network that receives over 100 million views per month and in just two years it amassed an audience of more than 36 million subscribers.

mun2, re-branded as NBC Universo on February 1, 2015, was the fastest growing Hispanic cable network with women 18-49 in total day Monday -Sunday 6a.m.- 2a.m., +8% year-over-year.  The network continued its double-digit growth with women. Source: Nielsen Media Research.

Radio

We cannot skip online radio, so we’ll take a look at the Pandora demographics. These are mostly Hispanics Males/Females younger than 24yrs old no college, some grad school, income range $0 – 55k, no kids. This is a very young demographic.

Hispanic Women and Online Search

Language used by Hispanic women to surf the web

Language used by Latinas to surf the web

“Latinas search in English for information in Spanish. Beyond language, a majority (62 percent) of Latinas wish for more lifestyle information about Latinas online, and over sixty percent want more lifestyle information written in Spanish. When Latinas search for Latino subject matter online, recipes top the list, followed by news, music, family health, beauty and celebrations.” Source: Comscore

Google is the most popular search engine among both genders but their behavior on Bing displays an interesting behavioral twist. In general, men perform a higher number of search queries than women (71.6 searches per searcher for men vs. 64.0 for women). When it comes down to Bing, Hispanic women perform a much higher number of searches than males that use this search engine do.

Google has seen the number of Google search queries that include common Spanish-language question words nearly double over the past 3 years. If you still think of “Hispanic Marketing” as “Spanish Marketing,” it’s time to re-evaluate your knowledge of this market. Looking for Spanish SEO or Spanish Inbound marketing will not help you capture a solid market share of the Hispanic market in the U.S., unless you only want to target this particular Hispanic market segment. But remember that even people who have recently immigrated to the U.S. will eventually be searching in English, Spanish and Spanglish.

Combine cultural relevance with language to get to the winning formula. – Havi Goffan

Why you need a Hispanic Inbound Marketing Agency

Hispanic Women market Opportunities & Challenges

I wouldn’t end this article without providing some tips and data regarding the Hispanic women market. Here are a few of the market’s opportunities and challenges.

Opportunities

  • Once a brand is identified as a trustworthy one, Hispanic women will share the news with family, friends, co-workers and this might lead these reference groups to continue the buzz about the brand around their own set of groups.
  • Customer relationship management is another important aspect to consider when marketing to Hispanics. Both from a cultural and language perspectives, this audience deserves careful consideration. The last thing a business should do is generate interest in their products or services to lose them once they form part of the customer-base.
  • Coupons have an influence on the Latino consumer’s decision.
  • Latina Bloggers have a strong influence in the purchasing decisions of many Hispanic moms.
  • 33% of Hispanic moms claim to have learned more about products and brands from online ads than from traditional media. Don’t forget internet ads!
  • Hispanic women are also more open to companies’ content: 57% said they read emails from brands while only 19% of U.S. moms do so.

Challenges

  • Brand loyalty towards one brand vs. another is very strong in some industries – e.g., the baby care industry. It may be based on brands used by previous generations or it built out of a product trial.
  • Hispanic women email lists need to be built in-house. Otherwise, be prepared to pay heftily for a solid list.
  • Trust generation is one of the most important achievements when targeting the Hispanic women market.

This audience IS the future. Play it smart and play it well. If you were doing business in China, you wouldn’t leave your marketing in the hands of people who knew nothing about the language and the culture, right? And there’s even more variations of Spanish than versions of Chinese. Don’t blame the market for not responding to your campaigns. The numbers are there and they are yours for the taking.

Words to live by

Words to live by

Next Quote? funny inspirational quotes on every post!

The story behind the Benetton WOM Campaign

The story behind the Benetton Word-of-Mouth (WOM) Campaign

Benetton, Italy’s largest clothing company, launched yesterday, November 16, 2011, a highly controversial Word-of-Mouth (WoM) campaign. They coupled this campaign with the launch of their newly founded advocacy group for tolerance, the Unhate Foundation.

The campaign content included a film promoting Unhate.org, love and tolerance; photo composite posters and wall video projections of Presidents Barack Obama and Hugo Chavez lovingly locking lips; and, social media activity including the Kiss Wall where users can upload images of themselves kissing and are randomly paired up with others thus mimicking the main campaign theme. Other featured kissing pairs include President Obama and Chinese President Hu Jintao; the Pope and Ahmed Mohamed el-Tayeb, the Imam of al-Azhar mosque in Egypt; the leaders of North and South Korea; German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Nicholas Sarkozy, president of France; Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

Benetton Unhate Campaign – CNN Interview (subtitled in English) – Claudia Havi Goffan

The campaign was inspired by a kiss between Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev and East German communist leader Erich Honecker in 1979. And this is just the first part of the three-part campaign. Benetton has a history of controversial advertising. Their campaigns that started on 1991, showed a black horse mating over a white one; a collage consisting of genitals of persons of various races; a priest and a nun about to engage in a romantic kiss; and the most famous of them all, a bloodied, unwashed newborn baby with umbilical cord still attached, which was featured in the reference book Guinness World Records 2000 as ‘Most Controversial Campaign.’

The White House stated that no advertising is allowed to use President Obama’s image while the Vatican condemned the campaign as well. The company’s deputy chairman, Alessandro Benetton, decided to remove it from all publications after complaints and an explanation that the campaign means not hating, and that embracing a loving attitude that can have a positive impact in the world.  The campaign is on every news site, blog, channel, all over the world. A true word-of-mouth marketing success.

The cost of such campaign via regular media purchasing methods would have meant an automatic dismissal amongst the management ranks of Benetton whose revenues had dwindled in the last quarter in Europe, where the company gets up to 80% of the total revenues. Their forecasted margins for the next few quarters look even bleaker with the expected increase in raw-material costs.

Shock tactics do work in advertising, and even though we haven’t heard much from the United Colors since their contentious ads and world take-over of their brand as one of the 90s’ most known and fashion forward, we know that Benetton has built their foundations on advertising equality and has come up with another genius concept here. We are sure there are already people reaching for their

Benetton WOM Campaign - Obama & Chavez Poster

Benetton WOM Campaign – Obama & Chavez Poster

phones to complain. This is a love it or hate it campaign. Their target market is very clear though. The urban young who wants to break with stereotypes and change the world into a better and more loving and accepting place.

We all know that the worst thing that can happen to a brand is not to be mentioned. Benetton got more than its share of mentions this time. All that we have left to see is their financials at the end of the next couple of quarters to see if it really paid off. And we believe it will.

 

By: Claudia “Havi” Goffan – President Target Latino – CNN en Español Interview – November 16th, 2011.

Watch the CNN Footage with Full Coverage of the Un-Hate Campaign

Interview with CNN Coverage of the Un-Hate Campaign in Spanish

speak the truth

speak the truth

Hispanic Market Trends Forecast

by Claudia “Havi” Goffan
Target Latino CEO

Claudia “Havi” Goffan had the honor of being appointed to the Innovaro Global Lifestyles Panel as their Hispanic Market Futurist. Following is a transcript of her presentation on The Future of the Hispanic Market.

Summary:Brief overview of the current Hispanic market situation, analysis of its past, and predictions for its future. A closer view of Latinos and Technology.

We’re living in a time when our world is being redefined. Even as you hear this, America continues to change. When you go to bed tonight, it will have changed even more. And, within the past 20 years, the Hispanic market projections have become a reality, our reality.

Find out what the Hispanic Market Trends Forecast are. Discover what four aspects count heavily towards adoption of Technology by Latinos. To continue reading click on the Hispanic Market Trends Forecast link.

Steve Jobs #innovation

Steve Jobs #innovator

Body language meaning in Colombia

Today we will discover the body language meaning in Colombia

  • Colombian women will often substitute the gesture of holding forearms for a handshake.
  • Men shake hands with direct eye contact.
  • Once a friendship has developed, greetings become warmer and a lot more hands on –  men will embrace and pat each other on the shoulder (known as an “abrazo”) and women kiss once on the right cheek.
  • If you are visiting on business and happen to tour a factory, it is polite to shake hands with those workers nearest you.
  • Etiquette and propriety are important that is why these Colombian girls sit up very straight! - Body language meaning in Colombia

    Etiquette and propriety are important that is why these Colombian girls sit up very straight! – Body language meaning in Colombia

    Etiquette and propriety are important in Colombia, therefore, avoid placing your feet on a table or other piece of furniture, and avoid yawning in public and eating on the streets.

  • Tapping the underside of the elbow with the fingers of the other hand suggests that someone is ‘stingy.’
  • To indicate that you have finished eating, place the knife and fork horizontally across the plate.
  • Hands should be kept visible when eating.
  • Resting elbows on the table is considered bad manners.
  • Women visitors should be especially sensitive about making any glance or gesture that might be considered flirtatious.
  • Colombians are termed as ‘indirect communicators’ – this means there is more information within body language and context rather than the words, i.e. if you ask someone to do something and they reply ‘I will have to see’, it would be up to you to read their body language and realize that they can not do it.
do your thing

do your thing

The meaning of gestures Puerto Rico

The meaning of gestures Puerto Rico

The meaning of gestures Puerto Rico

The next country and second on the series of understanding body language and Hispanic culture.

The meaning of gestures Puerto Rico

  • As in most Latin countries, people tend to stand close to one another in any social or even business setting. This relates to a different perspective on ‘personal space,’ with North Americans and many Europeans believing that people should stand about an arm’s length from one another. If you tend to move away from a Latin first, it could be considered as offensive or insulting.
  • Men tend to smile and stare at women, which is considered acceptable, but the reverse is not.
  • Puerto Ricans tend to interrupt each other frequently and are not upset when this occurs.
  • If someone wiggles their nose, it probably means he or she is saying ‘What’s going on here?’
  • You will hear restaurant patrons signal for waiters by making a ‘psssst’ sound.

We hope you enjoyed from the meaning of gestures Puerto Rico and feel free to send us a comment if you know more of these gestures that belong only to Puerto Rico. 🙂

confidence

confidence quote

Photo courtesy: Ballet Majestad Negra of Piñones at the city of Loíza, Puerto Rico

Body language: the meaning of gestures in Mexico

Gestures in Mexico

Gestures in Mexico

Body language is an important part of the communication process. Noticing the signals that people send out with their body language is a very useful social skill. All who specialize in research, grassroots marketing, community outreach, event marketing understand that body language is a key body of knowledge to have.

This is the first of a Hispanic culture series on body language and gestures in Latin American countries.

The meaning of gestures in Mexico

  • A warm, somewhat soft handshake is the customary greeting among both men and women. Men should let the woman make the first move toward handshaking. After the second or third meeting, Mexican men may begin with or add the abrazo, the embrace along with a few pats on the back. Women friends will embrace lightly and pretend to kiss a cheek.
  • In some areas of Mexico, you may encounter an unusual addition to the handshake where, after gripping the palm, the two people slide their hands upward to grasp each other’s thumbs.
  • Many Mexicans are ‘touch oriented.’ This means they may linger over a handshake, they may touch the forearm or elbow, or they may even casually finger the lapel of the other person’s suit. All these touches merely signify a willingness to be friendly nothing more.
  • If a man stands with his hands on his hips, it suggests hostility.
  • Deference is shown to the elderly, so give way to them in public and don’t object if they are waited on first.
  • Never visit churches or religious sites while wearing shorts, tank tops, or cut-off shirts or shorts.
  • The national drink in Mexico is tequila. To drink it properly, here is the procedure: place a pinch of salt in the depression of your left hand between thumb and forefinger; then lick the salt and quickly take a drink of tequila; follow this by sucking on a lime wedge.
  • You can call attention to yourself or call a waiter by lifting your hand above your head or maybe a bit lower with the index finger extended upwards and adding a “Pssst!” or “Pshhh!” sound. This is not considered rude and it also applies to other cultures such as Haiti, Argentina, and Spain.
  • Patience is important; avoid showing anger if and when you encounter delays or interruptions.
people may not tell you how they feel about you but they always show you

people may not tell you how they feel about you but they always show you

The Latino Vote

When comparing the Press Releases the Pew Hispanic sent out on October 5, 2010 and on November 3, 2010, one cannot but wonder. What is exactly the Latino vote? And do people really understand this Latino vote?

The Pew announced prior to the Congressional Elections that their research indicated that “65% of Latino registered voters say they plan to support the Democratic candidate in their local congressional district.” The findings pointed towards the prediction that in a year when support for Democratic candidates has eroded, the party’s standing among one key voting group—Latinos—appeared as strong as ever.

The latino vote and immigration reform principles. Photo Credit: www.truthdig.com

The latino vote and immigration reform principles. Photo Credit: www.truthdig.com

One month later, for Tuesday’s midterm elections, Hispanic vote makes history. For the first time ever, three Latino  candidates – all of them Republicans – won top statewide offices. In New Mexico, voters elected the nation’s first Latina governor, Republican Susana Martinez. In Nevada, Republican Brian Sandoval won the governor’s race and became Nevada’s first Hispanic governor. And in Florida, Republican Marco Rubio won the U.S. Senate race.

How much does this research predict what Latinos think in politics or who they will support? Everybody seems to believe that immigration is at the forefront in the Hispanic agenda. This survey shows that immigration does not rank as a top voting issue for Hispanics. Rather, they rank education, jobs and health care as their top three issues of concern for this year’s congressional campaign. Immigration ranks as the fifth most important issue for Latino registered voters and as the fourth most important issue for all Latinos.

Among the report’s other findings:

-Majorities of almost all demographic groups of Latino registered voters say they will vote for the Democratic Party candidate in their local congressional election Nov. 2. Only among Republican Latino registered voters does a majority (74%) say they will support the Republican congressional candidate.

-Some groups of Latino registered voters are more motivated than others to vote this year. More than six-in-ten (62%) of those who are ages 50 to 64 are absolutely certain they will vote, as are 61% of those who have at least some college education, 58% of those who are English dominant and 58% of Latino registered voters ages 65 or older.

-Fewer than four-in-ten (38%) of Latino registered voters who are Spanish dominant say they are absolutely certain to vote this year. This is lower than any other demographic group of Latino registered voters.

-Some six-in-ten (59%) Latino registered voters are dissatisfied with the direction the country is headed, down from 70% in July 2008 (Lopez and Minushkin, 2008a).

-Two-thirds (66%) of Latino registered voters say they talked about the immigration policy debate in the past year with someone they know.The report, based on a national survey of 1,375 Hispanic adults, including 618 registered voters, looks at Latinos’ partisan preferences in the congressional elections; their party identification; their level of voter motivation; and the issues they identify as important in the upcoming elections.

I believe that people should stop looking at Hispanics as one whole block where they all vote the same. Latinos are as varied as they come and their political preferences match their upbringing, the current situation, their education level, their country of origin’s political history and how it affected them and their acculturation levels.

by Claudia “Havi” Goffan

leadership

leadership


Hispanics social media marketing strategy – a must

Any company that comes in contact with online Hispanic consumers would be negligent not to include them on its social media marketing strategy. The focal point should be the identification of the technologies and social media channels that are a strategic fit.

By Havi Goffan

Any company that comes in contact with online Hispanic consumers would be negligent not to include them in its social media marketing strategy.

Any company that comes in contact with online Hispanic consumers would be negligent not to include them in its social media marketing strategy.

U.S.-based Hispanic consumers are significantly more likely to participate in online social media than their non-Hispanic counterparts, making a social media strategy a must for any marketer wanting to reach this group online, according to a new report from Forrester Research Inc.

The research findings are as follows:

Online Hispanics are more involved and likely to listen to word-of-mouth

  • 69% of 3,000 online Hispanics are Spectators, meaning that they watch, read or listen to what others have created online.
  • Only 42% of non-Hispanics online are Spectators

Online Hispanics are more active

  • 40% of online Hispanics have the highest level of online activity and are characterized as Creators, meaning that they take part in such online activities as blogging, publishing web pages and uploading audio and video.
  • Only 12% of non-Hispanics online consumers participate in these activities.

Online Hispanics have a higher level of “Influentials”

  • 77% of online Hispanic adults take part in some sort of online social activity: Forrester characterized this group as influential, reporting that on average 60% tell friends and family about products that interest them.
  • more than 70% of all Hispanics surveyed said they stay with brands they like, suggesting that marketers who successfully build relationships with them now will have advocates for the long term.

Why are Hispanics more predisposed toward online social networking?

  • First, Hispanics are customarily early adopters of entertainment technologies, and this corresponds online to the use of video, audio and other related social media technologies such as blogging.
  • Second, Hispanic culture emphasizes the group over the individual, therefore Hispanic consumers tend to look to others for advice or agreement on product choices.
  • Third, according to research, “even though many U.S.-born Hispanic consumers prefer to use the Spanish language, many media publishers and marketers in the U.S. don’t offer this option. Social networking provides Hispanics with opportunities to fill that online gap by contributing their own Spanish-language content”, Forrester says.

Hispanics social media marketing strategy – a must

Any company that comes in contact with online Hispanic consumers would be negligent not to include them on its social media marketing strategy. The focal point should be the identification of the technologies and social media channels that are a strategic fit.

25 social interaction metrics or how to measure your social media marketing campaign

by Claudia “Havi” Goffan

How do we measure the effectiveness of your brand's social media marketing campaigns?

How do we measure the effectiveness of your brand’s social media marketing campaigns?

Social media has evolved into an every day way of interaction and communication for a large part of the population. And this evolution started in the last century when social media commenced amidst the original chats in chatrooms and blogs. The first blog was created in the late 1980’s: http://www.netfunny.com/rhf/ and it is still alive and well today. Online dating sites, also a part of social media, started with online chats and became famous in 1988 with the movie “You’ve Got Mail”. In 2008, one out of nine couples that got married that year, actually met online. It is expected that the U.S. online dating market will reach $932 million in 2011.

Companies are starting 2010 with sparkling new social media campaigns and everybody knows it’s about the engagement, right? So, how do we measure the effectiveness of your brand’s social media marketing campaigns?

The ultimate approach to social media marketing campaign measurement will look at the things that really matter: sales, profits, customer satisfaction and loyalty. But that may take some time and you need to know how to gage the effectiveness of your social media marketing campaign to see if you are headed in the right direction in order to meet those objectives. Therefore, I wanted to share with you 25 social interaction metrics of key performance indicators to use with your social media marketing campaign. This is not an exhaustive list neither it is listed by order of importance and each social media marketer needs to identify the ones that are most suited for them.

I hope you find them useful and that you feel free to share additional ones with us and with our readers.

  1. CTR
  2. Re-Tweets/Mash-ups/Re-posting
  3. Bookmarks
  4. Comments
  5. Downloads
  6. Email / newsletter subscriptions
  7. Number of Fans/Followers
  8. Feedback
  9. Forward to a friend/Invite / Refer
  10. Amount of Group activity/interaction
  11. Number of downloads or widget installations
  12. Key page post-activity
  13. Ratings
  14. Onsite Messaging
  15. Posts
  16. Number of Registered users (new / total / active / dormant / churn)
  17. Report spam / abuse
  18. Reviews/ Testimonials
  19. Social media sharing / participation (activity on key social media sites, e.g. Facebook, Twitter, Digg, etc)
  20. Tagging (user-generated metadata)
  21. Time spent on key pages
  22. Time spent on site (by source / by entry page)
  23. Total contributors (and % active contributors)
  24. Uploads (add an item, e.g. articles, links, images, videos)
  25. Views (videos, ads, rich images)

Inside Hispanic America

by Claudia “Havi” Goffan

Winner of the Publisher’s Multicultural Award Category: Best Multicultural Awareness Article

What is life like in America for Hispanic Americans?  What are their thoughts and concerns about family, employment, education, religion, opportunities, and healthcare?  We asked Claudia Goffan, founder of Target Latino, an Atlanta based marketing and consulting firm specializing in the Hispanic market, to provide “The College World Reporter” readers with her own views from inside Hispanic America. Here is our interview:

Claudia "Havi" Goffan - Hispanic Marketing Expert and CEO of Target Latino

Claudia “Havi” Goffan – Hispanic Marketing Expert and CEO of Target Latino

Q.Could you give us an inside look at Hispanic or Latino life?

A. To fully understand the Hispanic market, you need to analyze it by country of origin, level of acculturation, age, sex, marital status and educational level. Although some generalizations can be made, they have to be understood as such and not as an answer to comprehending the culture.

Let’s talk about some of the generalizations about the Hispanic culture. The very first one that comes to mind is about family being the first priority, the children are celebrated and sheltered and the wife usually fulfills a domestic role. Hispanics have a long Roman Catholic tradition and this usually implies quite a fatalistic outlook where destiny is in the hands of God. Latin American educational system is based on emphasis on the theoretical, memorization and a rigid and very broad curriculum. It follows the French schooling system and it translates into people who are generalists and look at the big picture as opposed to specialists, like in the U.S. Hispanics are highly nationalistic, very proud of long history and traditions.

Hispanics have difficulty separating work and personal relationships and are sensitive to differences of opinion. Hispanics fear loss of face, especially publicly and shun confrontation, where truth is tempered by the need for diplomacy. Title and position are more important than money in the eyes of Hispanic society. Etiquette and manners are seen as a measure of breeding and it follows an “old world” formality. Dress and grooming are status symbols whereas in the U.S. appearance is secondary to performance. The aesthetic side of life is important even at work.

Q. Tell us about the purchasing power of the U.S. Hispanics?

A. According to the University of Georgia’s Selig Center for Economic Growth in 2004 the nation’s largest minority group controlled $686 billion in spending. The community’s purchasing power comprises the world’s ninth biggest economy and it’s larger than the GNP of Brazil, Spain or Mexico. Hispanic purchasing power is projected to reach as much as $1 trillion by next year (2010) being the main drivers of the surge in Hispanic consumer influence the increasing education levels, labor force composition, household characteristics and accumulation of wealth. The fastest-growing occupational categories for Hispanics are higher paying managerial and professional jobs.

Q. What about Hispanics’ Healthcare Access?

A. I will quote a new analysis by the Pew Hispanic Center that indicates that six-in-ten Hispanic adults living in the United States who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents lack health insurance. According to this same study, the share of uninsured among this group (60%) is much higher than the share of uninsured among Latino adults who are legal permanent residents or citizens (28%), or among the adult population of the United States (17%). Hispanic adults who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents tend to be younger and healthier than the adult U.S. population and are less likely than other groups to have a regular health care provider. Just 57% say there is a place they usually go when they are sick or need advice about their health, compared with 76% of Latino adults who are citizens or legal permanent residents and 83% of the adult U.S. population.

Overall, four-in-ten (41%) non-citizen, non-legal permanent resident Hispanics state that their usual provider is a community clinic or health center. These centers are designed primarily as “safety nets” for vulnerable populations and are funded by a variety of sources, including the federal government, state governments and private foundations, as well as reimbursements from patients, based upon a sliding scale (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2008).

Six out of 10 Hispanics are U.S.-born - Inside Hispanic America

Six out of 10 Hispanics are U.S.-born – Inside Hispanic America

The study also reports that some 37% of Latino adults who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents have no usual health care provider. More than one-fourth (28%) of the people in this group indicate that financial limitations prevent them from having a usual provider – 17% report that their lack of insurance is the primary reason, while 12% cite high medical costs in general. However, a majority (56%) say they do not have a usual provider because they simply do not need one. An additional 5% state that difficulty in navigating the U.S. health care system prevents them from having a usual provider. According to Pew Hispanic Center estimates, 11.9 million undocumented immigrants were living in the U.S. in 2008. Three-quarters (76%) of these undocumented immigrants were Latinos.

Regarding health status, the study reports that the Latino population in the U.S. is relatively young, and Latino adults who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents are younger still. Some 43% of adult Latinos who are not citizens or legal permanent residents are younger than age 30, compared with 27% of Hispanic adults who are citizens or legal permanent residents and 22% of the adult U.S. population.  The youthfulness of this population contributes to its relative healthiness.

About the Hispanic experiences in the Health Care System, the Pew reports that three-fourths (76%) of Latino adults who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents report that the quality of medical care they received in the past year was excellent or good. This is similar to the proportion of adult Latino citizens and legal permanent residents (78%) who express satisfaction with their recent health care. However, when asked a separate question – whether they had received any poor medical treatment in the past five years – adult Latinos who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents are less likely (16%) to report any problems than are Latinos who are citizens or legal permanent residents (24%).

Among those Latinos who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents who report receiving poor medical treatment in the past five years, a plurality (46%) state that they believed their accent or the way they spoke English contributed to that poor care. A similar share (43%) believed that their inability to pay for care contributed to their poor treatment. More than one-third (37%) felt that their race or ethnicity played a part in their poor care, and one-fourth (25%) attributed the unsatisfactory treatment to something in their medical history.

Q. What is the difference in viewpoint between young Hispanics or Latinos born and raised in the United States, and their older parents or grandparents who migrated to the U.S. from other countries?

A. The one difference that applies to all Latinos existent between non and semi-acculturated Hispanics and fully-acculturated or U.S. born Hispanics (young or old) is that whereas the non and semi-acculturated Latinos are trying to learn how to navigate the American culture, the U.S. born Hispanics or fully-acculturated know how to navigate the American culture and “learn” to navigate the Hispanic one from their family.

Q. Who are people on the rise in the Hispanic or Latino community that may become corporate leaders, or the next Sonia Sotomayor?

A. There are many Hispanics on the rise in every walk of life in the United States. Some people may not even notice of their Hispanic background because it usually comes to light when there are political issues at stake. For example, a currently retired doctor that was the Director of Cardiology of the St. Joseph’s Hospital in Atlanta was originally from Argentina. The creative that many years ago came up with the successful campaign for a drug that put the country to sleep is a Nuyorican (Puerto Rican born in New York).

Regarding known Latinos on the rise, you may want to keep an eye on Christine Arguello, Judge, U.S. District Court, Colorado; Emiliano Calemzuk, President, Fox Television Studios; Ignacia Moreno, Counsel, Corporate Environmental Programs, General Electric Company; Esther Salas, U.S. Magistrate Judge, District of New Jersey; Thomas Saenz, President and General Counsel, Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund (MALDEF); Hilda Solis, Secretary of Labor; Rosa Gumatatotao Rios, United States Treasurer; Elena Rios, President & CEO, National Hispanic Medical Foundation; Enrique Conterno; President, Eli Lilly, USA and Edward Chavez, Justice, the State of New Mexico Supreme Court, among many others.

Q. What should everyone know about Hispanics or Latinos?

A. The first thing that comes to mind is the very little known fact that 6 out of 10 Latinos are U.S. born.  The second one is that the younger the generation, the higher the percentage of Hispanics in it. It is imperative to understand the new U.S. demographics when developing business strategies, city planning, new products, etc.

About Claudia Goffan: Recognized as an expert in Latino Marketing by CNN en Español, Claudia has been featured in Adweek, Hispanic Business, Univision, Telemundo and other national and international media.

A native from Buenos Aires, Argentina, Claudia has been very influential in the Hispanic markets in the U.S. and Latin America – both from a business and a community standpoint – always with outstanding results. Claudia has contributed to companies such as, The Occasions Group, The Taylor Corporation, El Banco de Nuestra Comunidad (A division of SunTrust Bank), XEROX, AT&T, BellSouth, Citibank, Papa John’s, Liberty Mutual, British Telecom, Gold’s Gym, Sherwin Williams, and Verizon, among others.

A motivator, strategic and hands-on, innovative, creative and resourceful. It has been said that her humor and presence immediately captivate audiences. She has an MBA from the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina and from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), and more than 20 years specializing in Marketing and Strategic Planning both internationally and domestically. She is bilingual and bicultural in English and Spanish and fluent in Portuguese, French, and Italian.

About Target Latino: Target Latino was founded in 2003, with a vision unparalleled at the time – to show American companies the importance of the U.S. Hispanic market – not by preaching but by acting. Target Latino is a marketing consulting firm specializing in the Hispanic market and inbound strategies.  Target Latino has a long standing experience of driving results in tough economic times.  Target Latino is minority owned, and a percentage of its proceeds go to different charity causes.

So true. Great Quotes

Great quote