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Latinas with Lactose Intolerance Go The Natural Way

A recent study by the LACTAID® Brand found that 77 percent of Latinas with lactose intolerance reduce or limit the amount of dairy in their diet. This is concerning given that the calcium and vitamin D found in milk and dairy products play an important role in living a healthy lifestyle. With the holiday season fast approaching, it is likely that many favorite dishes will include dairy. Luckily, there is a way to manage your lactose intolerance and make milk and dairy products a daily, dietary habit – particularly during the holiday season.

Here are some tips for creating a healthy, calcium-rich diet:

  • Include dark leafy greens such as kale and mustard, collard, broccoli and turnip greens or beans into your favorite, traditional dishes. These foods are not only good sources of calcium, but also low in fat.
  • To boost your calcium intake, use canned fish such as salmon, in festive salads or pastas.
  • The same nutrients found in “regular” dairy products are also found in lactose-free products. Try lactose-free LACTAID® Milk, which is real milk, and rich in calcium and vitamin D when preparing favorite holiday desserts such as Christmas Custard or Flan de Leche.

Visit www.lactaidenespanol.com to learn more about lactose intolerance, access recipes for traditional, holiday dishes and get more information about LACTAID® Milk and Dairy Products. Also, to access a recent webinar presentation about the topic featuring comedian and actress Angelica Vale as well as Sylvia, visit http://www.videonewswire.com/event.asp?id=61635.

About Sylvia:

Sylvia Melendez-Klinger is a registered dietitian and certified personal trainer as well as founder of Hispanic Food Communications, a culinary consulting company. Mrs. Klinger has an extensive public health nutrition background having conducted research at Northwestern University Medical School in Chicago and the University of California Irvine Medical Center and serving as supervising nutritionist for the Women, Infants and Children (WIC) supplemental feeding program. Mrs. Klinger is a member of the American Dietetic Association, Illinois Dietetic Association and Latino Hispanic Dietetic Association network group (LAHIDAN).

Corona ‘Can Do’ With New 24-Ounce Cans

Demand for single-serve business drives Corona Extra and Corona Light brand offerings

Crown Imports today announced the launch of new Corona Extra and Corona Light 24-ounce can packages aimed at the $3.2 billion single-serve segment of the beer business.

Demand for single-serve business drives Corona Extra and Corona Light brand offerings

Demand for single-serve business drives Corona Extra and Corona Light brand offerings

“This occasion based business already represents nearly 13 percent of dollar share in the off-premise channel. Based on the growing demand from consumers and retailers for single-serve options, we see a great opportunity for Corona in this space,” said Jim Sabia, Executive Vice President of Marketing for Crown Imports, Corona’s exclusive U.S. importer.

According to IRI data, over the past four years import brands in the 24-ounce single-serve segment have averaged 13.3 percent case sales growth versus 4.7 percent for domestics, accelerating faster than the category case trend by nearly seven fold.

The Corona Extra 24-oz can will arrive at retail in 26 initial markets* this month with the Corona Light can to follow shortly thereafter. The Corona Extra and Corona Light 24-ounce cans are targeted to 21-44 year-old General Market and Hispanic drinkers from the service and manufacturing trades. “Our consumer research indicates these consumers see Corona as a reward. Our 24-ounce cans offer a new trade-up option for drinkers looking for a premium beer experience,” Sabia said. The previously introduced Corona Extra 24-ounce single-serve bottle is currently a top ten package amongst all 24-ounce packages according to IRI.

Primary channels of distribution for the new Corona Extra and Corona Light 24-ounce cans are convenience, drug, liquor and grocery stores. “Convenience stores especially may benefit from the incremental purchase occasions and additional traffic the Corona Extra and Corona Light 24-ounce cans would deliver,” reports Bruce Jacobson, Executive Vice President of Sales for Crown Imports. IRI reports indicate that single-serve 24-ounce packages represents close to 11 percent of the case volume sold in the convenience store channel, making it a key package in a channel designed around convenience and immediate consumption.

Crown continues to invest in new packages and options suitable for the off-premise channel and at-home consumption opportunities. According to the Beer Institute, the off-premise channel currently delivers 82 percent of beer industry volume and may lead category resurgence in the year ahead.

*Editor’s note: 26 initial markets include AZ, CA, CO, CT, D.C., FL, GA, IL, IN, LA, MA, MD, MI, MO, NC, NJ, NM, NV, NY, OH, OR, SC, TN, TX, VA, WA.

Source: IRI InfoScan, Total US Fs/Dg/Cv, 52 weeks ending 9/2/09

About Crown Imports

Crown Imports LLC is a joint venture that imports, distributes and markets the Modelo portfolio and other fine beer brands across the entire U.S. The Modelo portfolio includes Corona Extra, the #1 imported beer in the U.S. and #6 beer overall, Corona Light, Modelo Especial, Negra Modelo and Pacifico beer brands. For more information, visit www.crownimportsllc.com. Crown Imports is a 50-50 joint venture between Grupo Modelo, S.A. de C.V. (MX: GMODELOC), Mexico’s leading company in the brewing, distribution and sale of beer, and Constellation Brands, Inc. (NYSE: STZ, ASX: CBR), a leading international beverage alcohol producer, importer and marketer.

SOURCE Crown Imports LLC

10.05% of Hispanic Americans consider themselves lactose intolerant

Lactose Intolerant Hispanic Rates May Be Significantly Lower Than Previously Believed

New study sheds light on self-reported prevalence rates

Prevalence of lactose intolerance may be far lower than previously estimated, according to a study in the latest issue of Nutrition Today.(1)The study, which uses data from a national sample of three ethnic groups, reveals that the overall prevalence rate of self-reported lactose intolerance is 12 percent – with 7.72 percent of European Americans, 10.05 percent of Hispanic Americans and 19.5 percent of African Americans who consider themselves lactose intolerant.

10.05% of Hispanic Americans consider themselves lactose intolerant

10.05% of Hispanic Americans consider themselves lactose intolerant

These new findings indicate that previous estimates of lactose intolerance incidence – based on the incidence of lactose maldigestion – may be overestimated by wide margins. Previous studies have found lactose maldigestion, or low lactase activity in the gut, to occur in approximately 15 percent of European Americans, 50 percent of Mexican Americans and 80 percent of African Americans.(2,3,4) The new study shows that lactose intolerance, based on self-reported data, may actually occur far less frequently than presumed.

“There’s so much confusion surrounding lactose intolerance,” said Theresa Nicklas, DrPH, of the USDA/ARS Children’s Nutrition Research Center at Baylor College of Medicine and lead study author. “By getting a better handle on the true number of people who deal with this condition every day, the nutrition community can be better equipped to educate and provide dietary guidance for Americans, including strategies to help meet dairy food recommendations for those who self-report lactose intolerance.”

Since increasing daily consumption of dairy can be an effective strategy for ensuring adequate intake of shortfall nutrients (such as calcium, magnesium and potassium),(5) those who do experience symptoms of lactose intolerance should know there are several practical solutions that can allow for consumption of milk and milk products. In fact, according to a recent study in the Journal of Sensory Studies, adults who identified themselves as lactose intolerant reported a higher liking of lactose-free cow’s milk compared to non-dairy, soy-based substitute beverage.(6)

“Those with lactose intolerance are often relieved to know they can still enjoy the great taste and health benefits of dairy if they follow certain strategies,” said Orsolya Palacios, PhD, RD, and lead author of the study. “The symptoms of lactose intolerance vary greatly for each individual, and there are options in the dairy case that allow almost everyone to take advantage of the health benefits provided by the recommended three daily servings of dairy foods.”

Recommended Solutions for Incorporating Dairy

Several health authorities have addressed ways that those with lactose intolerance can benefit from dairy’s unique nutrient package of nine essential nutrients including calcium, potassium, magnesium and vitamin A, identified as “nutrients of concern” by the current Dietary Guidelines for Americans.(7) The Dietary Guidelines encourages people with lactose intolerance to try lower-lactose dairy food options to ensure they get the essential nutrients found in dairy. In a supplement to the October issue of the Journal of the National Medical Association (JNMA), the National Medical Association states that dairy milk alone provides a key package of essential nutrients, and that African Americans should use dietary strategies to increase the amount of dairy foods they consume. And in a 2006 report, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends children with lactose intolerance still consume dairy foods to help meet calcium, vitamin D, protein and other nutrient needs essential for bone health and overall growth. The report cautions that lactose intolerance should not require avoidance of dairy foods.(8)

The National Dairy Council has identified some strategies to help people with lactose intolerance enjoy the taste and nutrition of dairy:

  • The good news is lactose-free milk is regular milk, just without the lactose.
    • It provides the same unique package of nine essential nutrients as found in the equivalent form of regular milk (reduced-fat, fat-free etc.) – calcium, potassium, phosphorus, protein, vitamins A, D and B12, riboflavin and niacin (niacin equivalents).
  • Try drinking small amounts of milk with meals.
    • Consuming milk with other foods or a meal can make it easier to digest, so try milk on cereal, in smoothies or licuados, and enjoy a glass of milk with lunch or dinner.
  • Try cooking with milk.
    • Make oatmeal with milk instead of water and add milk to soups, sauces, casseroles, etc.
  • Try eating yogurt.
    • Yogurts that contain live and active cultures can make it easier for the digestive system to digest lactose.
  • Try aged cheeses.
    • Aged cheeses like Swiss, Parmesan, Gouda, Colby, provolone, Cheddar, Edam, Fontina, Gruyere, Muenster and Monterey Jack have very little lactose.

For more information, visit www.nationaldairycouncil.org, and get the latest dairy and nutrition news from NDC’s blog,www.thedairyreport.com.

National Dairy Council® (NDC) is the nutrition research, education and communications arm of Dairy Management Inc(TM). On behalf of U.S. dairy farmers, NDC provides science-based nutrition information to, and in collaboration with, a variety of stakeholders committed to fostering a healthier society, including health professionals, educators, school nutrition directors, academia, industry, consumers and media. Established in 1915, NDC comprises a staff of nutrition science researchers, registered dietitians and communications experts dedicated to educating the public on the health benefits of consuming milk and milk products throughout a person’s lifespan.

In addition, NDC funds independent research to aid in the ongoing discovery of information about dairy foods’ important role in a healthy lifestyle. This research provides insights to industry for new dairy product innovation. In partnership with its network of state and regional dairy councils, NDC disseminates nutrition programs, materials and research to support government recommendations for improved nutrition for Americans, including consumption of at least three servings of nutrient-rich low-fat or fat-free milk and milk products a day.

(1) Nicklas TA, Qu H, Hughes SO. Prevalence of self-reported lactose intolerance in a multi-ethnic sample of adults. Nutrition Today 2009; 44(5):186-187

(2) Jarvis JK, Miller GD. Overcoming the barrier of lactose intolerance to reduce health disparities. J Natl Med Assoc 2002; 94:55-56

(3) Sabi T. Hypolactasia and lactase persistence; historical review and terminology. Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology. Supplement 1994; 202:1-6

(4) Scrimshaw NS, Murray ED. Prevalence of lactose maldigestion. Am J Clin Nutr 1988; 48:1086-1098

(5) Nicklas TA, O’Neil CE, Fulgoni III VL. The role of dairy in meeting the recommendations for shortfall nutrients in the American diet. J Am Coll Nutr 2009; 28:1S-9S

(6) Palacios OM, Badran J, Drake MA, Reisner M, Moskowitz HR. Consumer acceptance of cow’s milk versus soy beverages; impact of ethnicity, lactose tolerance and sensory performance segmentation. Journal of Sensory Studies 2009; 24 (5): 731-748(18)

(7) U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture. Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2005. 6th Edition, Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, January 2005.

(8) American Academy of Pediatrics, Lactose intolerance in infants, children, and adolescents. Pediatrics. 2006; 118 (3):1279-1286

    For more information:
    NDC Media Hotline
    312-240-2880
    ndc@dairyinfo.com

SOURCE National Dairy Council

Latinas with Lactose Intolerance Go The Natural Way

A recent study by the LACTAID® Brand found that 77 percent of Latinas with lactose intolerance reduce or limit the amount of dairy in their diet. This is concerning given that the calcium and vitamin D found in milk and dairy products play an important role in living a healthy lifestyle. With the holiday season fast approaching, it is likely that many favorite dishes will include dairy. Luckily, there is a way to manage your lactose intolerance and make milk and dairy products a daily, dietary habit – particularly during the holiday season.

Here are some tips for creating a healthy, calcium-rich diet:

  • Include dark leafy greens such as kale and mustard, collard, broccoli and turnip greens or beans into your favorite, traditional dishes. These foods are not only good sources of calcium, but also low in fat.
  • To boost your calcium intake, use canned fish such as salmon, in festive salads or pastas.
  • The same nutrients found in “regular” dairy products are also found in lactose-free products. Try lactose-free LACTAID® Milk, which is real milk, and rich in calcium and vitamin D when preparing favorite holiday desserts such as Christmas Custard or Flan de Leche.

Visit www.lactaidenespanol.com to learn more about lactose intolerance, access recipes for traditional, holiday dishes and get more information about LACTAID® Milk and Dairy Products. Also, to access a recent webinar presentation about the topic featuring comedian and actress Angelica Vale as well as Sylvia, visit http://www.videonewswire.com/event.asp?id=61635.

About Sylvia:

Sylvia Melendez-Klinger is a registered dietitian and certified personal trainer as well as founder of Hispanic Food Communications, a culinary consulting company. Mrs. Klinger has an extensive public health nutrition background having conducted research at Northwestern University Medical School in Chicago and the University of California Irvine Medical Center and serving as supervising nutritionist for the Women, Infants and Children (WIC) supplemental feeding program. Mrs. Klinger is a member of the American Dietetic Association, Illinois Dietetic Association and Latino Hispanic Dietetic Association network group (LAHIDAN).

Corona ‘Can Do’ With New 24-Ounce Cans

Demand for single-serve business drives Corona Extra and Corona Light brand offerings

Crown Imports today announced the launch of new Corona Extra and Corona Light 24-ounce can packages aimed at the $3.2 billion single-serve segment of the beer business.

Demand for single-serve business drives Corona Extra and Corona Light brand offerings

Demand for single-serve business drives Corona Extra and Corona Light brand offerings

“This occasion based business already represents nearly 13 percent of dollar share in the off-premise channel. Based on the growing demand from consumers and retailers for single-serve options, we see a great opportunity for Corona in this space,” said Jim Sabia, Executive Vice President of Marketing for Crown Imports, Corona’s exclusive U.S. importer.

According to IRI data, over the past four years import brands in the 24-ounce single-serve segment have averaged 13.3 percent case sales growth versus 4.7 percent for domestics, accelerating faster than the category case trend by nearly seven fold.

The Corona Extra 24-oz can will arrive at retail in 26 initial markets* this month with the Corona Light can to follow shortly thereafter. The Corona Extra and Corona Light 24-ounce cans are targeted to 21-44 year-old General Market and Hispanic drinkers from the service and manufacturing trades. “Our consumer research indicates these consumers see Corona as a reward. Our 24-ounce cans offer a new trade-up option for drinkers looking for a premium beer experience,” Sabia said. The previously introduced Corona Extra 24-ounce single-serve bottle is currently a top ten package amongst all 24-ounce packages according to IRI.

Primary channels of distribution for the new Corona Extra and Corona Light 24-ounce cans are convenience, drug, liquor and grocery stores. “Convenience stores especially may benefit from the incremental purchase occasions and additional traffic the Corona Extra and Corona Light 24-ounce cans would deliver,” reports Bruce Jacobson, Executive Vice President of Sales for Crown Imports. IRI reports indicate that single-serve 24-ounce packages represents close to 11 percent of the case volume sold in the convenience store channel, making it a key package in a channel designed around convenience and immediate consumption.

Crown continues to invest in new packages and options suitable for the off-premise channel and at-home consumption opportunities. According to the Beer Institute, the off-premise channel currently delivers 82 percent of beer industry volume and may lead category resurgence in the year ahead.

*Editor’s note: 26 initial markets include AZ, CA, CO, CT, D.C., FL, GA, IL, IN, LA, MA, MD, MI, MO, NC, NJ, NM, NV, NY, OH, OR, SC, TN, TX, VA, WA.

Source: IRI InfoScan, Total US Fs/Dg/Cv, 52 weeks ending 9/2/09

About Crown Imports

Crown Imports LLC is a joint venture that imports, distributes and markets the Modelo portfolio and other fine beer brands across the entire U.S. The Modelo portfolio includes Corona Extra, the #1 imported beer in the U.S. and #6 beer overall, Corona Light, Modelo Especial, Negra Modelo and Pacifico beer brands. For more information, visit www.crownimportsllc.com. Crown Imports is a 50-50 joint venture between Grupo Modelo, S.A. de C.V. (MX: GMODELOC), Mexico’s leading company in the brewing, distribution and sale of beer, and Constellation Brands, Inc. (NYSE: STZ, ASX: CBR), a leading international beverage alcohol producer, importer and marketer.

SOURCE Crown Imports LLC

10.05% of Hispanic Americans consider themselves lactose intolerant

Lactose Intolerant Hispanic Rates May Be Significantly Lower Than Previously Believed

New study sheds light on self-reported prevalence rates

Prevalence of lactose intolerance may be far lower than previously estimated, according to a study in the latest issue of Nutrition Today.(1)The study, which uses data from a national sample of three ethnic groups, reveals that the overall prevalence rate of self-reported lactose intolerance is 12 percent – with 7.72 percent of European Americans, 10.05 percent of Hispanic Americans and 19.5 percent of African Americans who consider themselves lactose intolerant.

10.05% of Hispanic Americans consider themselves lactose intolerant

10.05% of Hispanic Americans consider themselves lactose intolerant

These new findings indicate that previous estimates of lactose intolerance incidence – based on the incidence of lactose maldigestion – may be overestimated by wide margins. Previous studies have found lactose maldigestion, or low lactase activity in the gut, to occur in approximately 15 percent of European Americans, 50 percent of Mexican Americans and 80 percent of African Americans.(2,3,4) The new study shows that lactose intolerance, based on self-reported data, may actually occur far less frequently than presumed.

“There’s so much confusion surrounding lactose intolerance,” said Theresa Nicklas, DrPH, of the USDA/ARS Children’s Nutrition Research Center at Baylor College of Medicine and lead study author. “By getting a better handle on the true number of people who deal with this condition every day, the nutrition community can be better equipped to educate and provide dietary guidance for Americans, including strategies to help meet dairy food recommendations for those who self-report lactose intolerance.”

Since increasing daily consumption of dairy can be an effective strategy for ensuring adequate intake of shortfall nutrients (such as calcium, magnesium and potassium),(5) those who do experience symptoms of lactose intolerance should know there are several practical solutions that can allow for consumption of milk and milk products. In fact, according to a recent study in the Journal of Sensory Studies, adults who identified themselves as lactose intolerant reported a higher liking of lactose-free cow’s milk compared to non-dairy, soy-based substitute beverage.(6)

“Those with lactose intolerance are often relieved to know they can still enjoy the great taste and health benefits of dairy if they follow certain strategies,” said Orsolya Palacios, PhD, RD, and lead author of the study. “The symptoms of lactose intolerance vary greatly for each individual, and there are options in the dairy case that allow almost everyone to take advantage of the health benefits provided by the recommended three daily servings of dairy foods.”

Recommended Solutions for Incorporating Dairy

Several health authorities have addressed ways that those with lactose intolerance can benefit from dairy’s unique nutrient package of nine essential nutrients including calcium, potassium, magnesium and vitamin A, identified as “nutrients of concern” by the current Dietary Guidelines for Americans.(7) The Dietary Guidelines encourages people with lactose intolerance to try lower-lactose dairy food options to ensure they get the essential nutrients found in dairy. In a supplement to the October issue of the Journal of the National Medical Association (JNMA), the National Medical Association states that dairy milk alone provides a key package of essential nutrients, and that African Americans should use dietary strategies to increase the amount of dairy foods they consume. And in a 2006 report, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends children with lactose intolerance still consume dairy foods to help meet calcium, vitamin D, protein and other nutrient needs essential for bone health and overall growth. The report cautions that lactose intolerance should not require avoidance of dairy foods.(8)

The National Dairy Council has identified some strategies to help people with lactose intolerance enjoy the taste and nutrition of dairy:

  • The good news is lactose-free milk is regular milk, just without the lactose.
    • It provides the same unique package of nine essential nutrients as found in the equivalent form of regular milk (reduced-fat, fat-free etc.) – calcium, potassium, phosphorus, protein, vitamins A, D and B12, riboflavin and niacin (niacin equivalents).
  • Try drinking small amounts of milk with meals.
    • Consuming milk with other foods or a meal can make it easier to digest, so try milk on cereal, in smoothies or licuados, and enjoy a glass of milk with lunch or dinner.
  • Try cooking with milk.
    • Make oatmeal with milk instead of water and add milk to soups, sauces, casseroles, etc.
  • Try eating yogurt.
    • Yogurts that contain live and active cultures can make it easier for the digestive system to digest lactose.
  • Try aged cheeses.
    • Aged cheeses like Swiss, Parmesan, Gouda, Colby, provolone, Cheddar, Edam, Fontina, Gruyere, Muenster and Monterey Jack have very little lactose.

For more information, visit www.nationaldairycouncil.org, and get the latest dairy and nutrition news from NDC’s blog,www.thedairyreport.com.

National Dairy Council® (NDC) is the nutrition research, education and communications arm of Dairy Management Inc(TM). On behalf of U.S. dairy farmers, NDC provides science-based nutrition information to, and in collaboration with, a variety of stakeholders committed to fostering a healthier society, including health professionals, educators, school nutrition directors, academia, industry, consumers and media. Established in 1915, NDC comprises a staff of nutrition science researchers, registered dietitians and communications experts dedicated to educating the public on the health benefits of consuming milk and milk products throughout a person’s lifespan.

In addition, NDC funds independent research to aid in the ongoing discovery of information about dairy foods’ important role in a healthy lifestyle. This research provides insights to industry for new dairy product innovation. In partnership with its network of state and regional dairy councils, NDC disseminates nutrition programs, materials and research to support government recommendations for improved nutrition for Americans, including consumption of at least three servings of nutrient-rich low-fat or fat-free milk and milk products a day.

(1) Nicklas TA, Qu H, Hughes SO. Prevalence of self-reported lactose intolerance in a multi-ethnic sample of adults. Nutrition Today 2009; 44(5):186-187

(2) Jarvis JK, Miller GD. Overcoming the barrier of lactose intolerance to reduce health disparities. J Natl Med Assoc 2002; 94:55-56

(3) Sabi T. Hypolactasia and lactase persistence; historical review and terminology. Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology. Supplement 1994; 202:1-6

(4) Scrimshaw NS, Murray ED. Prevalence of lactose maldigestion. Am J Clin Nutr 1988; 48:1086-1098

(5) Nicklas TA, O’Neil CE, Fulgoni III VL. The role of dairy in meeting the recommendations for shortfall nutrients in the American diet. J Am Coll Nutr 2009; 28:1S-9S

(6) Palacios OM, Badran J, Drake MA, Reisner M, Moskowitz HR. Consumer acceptance of cow’s milk versus soy beverages; impact of ethnicity, lactose tolerance and sensory performance segmentation. Journal of Sensory Studies 2009; 24 (5): 731-748(18)

(7) U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture. Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2005. 6th Edition, Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, January 2005.

(8) American Academy of Pediatrics, Lactose intolerance in infants, children, and adolescents. Pediatrics. 2006; 118 (3):1279-1286

    For more information:
    NDC Media Hotline
    312-240-2880
    ndc@dairyinfo.com

SOURCE National Dairy Council

GOT MILK? Summer Milkshake Recipes

GOT MILK? Partners with Acclaimed BLD Pastry Chef to Share Summer Milkshake Recipes

Personality in a cup - New Hispanic flavors

Personality in a cup – New Hispanic flavors

There’s a saying that you could tell people’s personalities based on the types of drink they enjoy. A person who likes a chocolaty beverage, for example, could be described as sweet and indulgent, while someone who likes fruity drinks could be described as carefree and fun. Pastry Chef Mariah Swan of Los Angeles-based BLD & Grace Restaurants says the same could be said for those who enjoy milkshakes. Just in time for summer parties and socials, Swan and BLD have partnered with the California Milk Processor Board (CMPB), the creator of GOT MILK? to share delicious, decadent and whimsical milkshake recipes for treat-lovers to enjoy during the hot days of the season.

“Milk is not only a healthy beverage, it’s also the base for many fun drinks like milkshakes,” says Swan, a graduate of the California School of Culinary Arts and a pastry chef at BLD for two-and-a-half years. “Drinking a milkshake brings out the kid in everyone, but each flavor highlights a person’s personality.”

GOT MILK? Summer Milkshake Recipes

Available exclusively on www.gotmilk.com/recipes, Swan has created summer milkshake recipes for those who cannot resist this good old-fashioned treat. She features one-of-a-kind milkshakes in her menu, each carefully created to bring out a unique personality. They include:

1) Blueberry Malt Milkshake – blueberry, a typical summertime fruit combined with milk and vanilla ice cream for people who are jovial and who like an unexpected twist in their drink

2) Frozen Mexican Chocolate – a decadent drink blending cocoa powder, milk, cinnamon and brownies on ice for those who do not know the word “compromise”

3) Salted Caramel Milkshake – a treat consisting of milk, vanilla ice cream, caramel sauce and salt topped with whipped cream for people who consider themselves sassy and sweet

“These milkshakes are more than a treat,” says CMPB Executive Director Steve James. “They’re an absolute delight for kids of all ages. This milkshake program is one of the ways the CMPB hopes to educate consumers about the many creative ways they can incorporate milk in their diets.”

To also catch the favorite milkshake recipes of various political, entertainment and sports personalities that include San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom, Sacramento Mayor Kevin Johnson, Los Angeles City Council President Eric Garcetti, High School Musical and Dancing with the Stars Personality Monique Coleman and San Diego Padre slugger Adrian Gonzalez, please log on to www.gotmilk.com/recipes.

Source: California Milk Processor Board

Mundet, the Wonderful Apple Soft Drink Centenario Promotion

Mundet announces the first winner of its national Centenario promotion — Julissa from Calexico, California. This contest commemorates the 100+- year heritage of Mundet, offering exciting prizes under special gold bottlecaps that can be found on Mundet Manzana Verde (Green Apple) and Sidral (Original Red Apple) Mundet bottles.

Mundet, the delicious apple-based soft drink which has been a part of the Mexican heritage since the early 20th century, is celebrating its 100+-year heritage with an exciting Centenario promotion. Consumers have the opportunity to win exciting instant-win prizes located under special gold bottlecaps found on Mundet Green Apple and Sidral Mundet glass bottles. The grand prizes are Centenarios, Mexican bullion coins created in 1921 to honor the 100-year anniversary of Mexico’s independence from Spain, with an approximate value of $1,500 each. Additional prizes include T-shirts and teddy bears.

The first Centenario prize winner was Julissa from Calexico, CA. The Centenario promotion is national in scope. Consumers still have a chance to win prizes, including more Centenario coins, because the promotion is scheduled to run through May, 2010, or until all prizes are awarded.

Mundet soft drinks are known for their unique and delicious real-apple flavor. Sidral Mundet does not contain any flavoring (natural or artificial), since its unique flavor comes from real apples. Mundet is popular with adults and children, and is considered by many to have health benefits due to its pasteurization process and since it does not contain caffeine. Many Mexican mothers use Mundet as a hydration fluid for their children.

Since 1988, Mundet soft drinks have been distributed in the United States exclusively by Novamex (www.novamex.com). Mundet is currently one of the best-selling Mexican soft drinks in the US. Novamex is a leader in the marketing and distribution of authentic Mexican products in the United States, including Jarritos, Mineragua and Mundet, delicious soft drinks with the great authentic flavor of Mexico. In additional to product sales, marketing and distribution, Novamex provides educational and sports opportunities to children and youth in high-Hispanic markets throughout the United States, and assists hundreds of churches and non-profit organizations through the donation of soft drinks that can be sold for fundraising purposes.

Source: Mundet

The Hispanic got milk? Campaign

The Hispanic got milk? Drink Well. Live Well. Tour Promotes the Milk Looks Good on You Sweepstakes During its Stop in Chicago

The Hispanic got milk? Campaign - la leche te queda bien

The Hispanic got milk? Campaign – la leche te queda bien

The Hispanic got milk? Milk Mustache Mobile Tour visited Chicago as part of its 75 city tour, including the top 10 Hispanic cities, to reintroduce Hispanics to this nutrient powerhouse and its array of benefits. The tour recently cruised through Chicago hosting free events to encourage local residents to not only live well, but to drink well with nature’s wellness drink: milk.

Learning with Milk... Blanca Jara learns the importance of incorporating milk into her daily diet at the got milk? Drink Well. Live Well. tour event in the Thompson Center. This initiative reinforces that milk, at about 25 cents a glass, provides you with 9 essential nutrients like calcium and Vitamin D -- plus it is one of the most economical sources of protein.

Learning with Milk… Blanca Jara learns the importance of incorporating milk into her daily diet at the got milk? Drink Well. Live Well. tour event in the Thompson Center. This initiative reinforces that milk, at about 25 cents a glass, provides you with 9 essential nutrients like calcium and Vitamin D — plus it is one of the most economical sources of protein.

At the events, Hispanic mothers were given the opportunity to enter the Milk Looks Good on You sweepstakes and win an original dress by Carolina Herrera, a free paid vacation for two to New York City for 3 nights and $500 for expenses.

Check us out at http://www.eligeleche.com to learn more about the Drink Well. Live Well. campaign and the Milk Looks Good on You sweepstakes.

 

The Hispanic got milk? Campaign - New faces of Wellness... The Ugarte sisters rock milk mustaches after tasting delicious milk from local processors. Older sister, Katherine, sets the example for her younger sister, Stephanie, to drink 3 glasses of low fat or fat free milk a day, as it helps build strong bones and achieve overall wellness.

The Hispanic got milk? Campaign – New faces of Wellness… The Ugarte sisters rock milk mustaches after tasting delicious milk from local processors. Older sister, Katherine, sets the example for her younger sister, Stephanie, to drink 3 glasses of low fat or fat free milk a day, as it helps build strong bones and achieve overall wellness.

The Milk Processor Education Program (MilkPEP), Washington, D.C., is funded by the nation’s milk processors, who are committed to increasing fluid milk consumption. The MilkPEP Board runs the national Milk Mustache “got milk?” Campaign, a multi-faceted campaign designed to educate consumers about the health benefits of milk. For more information, go to http://www.whymilk.com. The tagline “got milk?”(R) was created for the California Milk Processor Board by Goodby Silverstein & Partners and is licensed by the national milk processor and dairy producer groups.

Source: HispanicPR Wire

MillerCoors pact to serve Hispanics

MillerCoors pledged Friday to increase economic opportunities for Hispanics through an agreement with the Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility.
Through the joint agreement, MillerCoors and the Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility promise to increase and enhance economic opportunities for Hispanics through increased participation in key corporate initiatives such as leadership and work force development, procurement and supplier diversity, marketing and advertising, and community contributions.
“Growing and leveraging diversity will provide MillerCoors with a competitive advantage that will not only strengthen our business, but also strengthen the Hispanic community,” said Leo Kiely, MillerCoors CEO. “Through this agreement we will be able to use our collective power to achieve an important goal for both our organizations, to have Hispanics participating at greater levels in our business.”
The new five-year agreement is the first since MillerCoors was created in July 2008. Coors was a founding corporate member of HACR and has maintained an agreement since 1986.
“It is gratifying to see that MillerCoors recognizes the growing influence of Latinos in the marketplace, workplace and social mainstream, said HACR president and CEO Carlos Orta.
MillerCoors is a joint venture of Denver-based Molson Coors Brewing Co. and SABMiller PLC that combines the two international beer companies’ U.S. brewing operations.

MillerCoors pledged Friday to increase economic opportunities for Hispanics through an agreement with the Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility.

Through the joint agreement, MillerCoors and the Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility promise to increase and enhance economic opportunities for Hispanics through increased participation in key corporate initiatives such as leadership and work force development, procurement and supplier diversity, marketing and advertising, and community contributions.

“Growing and leveraging diversity will provide MillerCoors with a competitive advantage that will not only strengthen our business, but also strengthen the Hispanic community,” said Leo Kiely, MillerCoors CEO. “Through this agreement we will be able to use our collective power to achieve an important goal for both our organizations, to have Hispanics participating at greater levels in our business.”

The new five-year agreement is the first since MillerCoors was created in July 2008. Coors was a founding corporate member of HACR and has maintained an agreement since 1986.

“It is gratifying to see that MillerCoors recognizes the growing influence of Latinos in the marketplace, workplace and social mainstream, said HACR president and CEO Carlos Orta.

MillerCoors is a joint venture of Denver-based Molson Coors Brewing Co. and SABMiller PLC that combines the two international beer companies’ U.S. brewing operations.

Source: Denver Business Journal

An Aloe Vera Juice Site for the Hispanic Market?

Aloe Vera is a Hispanic folk remedy that has found its way into other cultures and into many skin creams. It has a strong soothing effect when applied directly from cut leaves. A bit gooey at first but oh so refreshing.

Aloe Vera is used to treat cuts and burns on the skin, it is believed to have skin rejuvenation powers and when in liquid form, it helps boost the immune system.

I still remember the words of one american surgeon that advised me to drink Aloe Vera juice during the 10 days before a surgery. How’s that for culture penetration?

Now US Farms, Inc., announced the launch of its new Hispanic focused web site  http://www.jugodealoevera.com, which will operate as a division of US Farms Inc.

Aloe Vera Plant

US Farms Aloe Vera Juice retails for $14.95 per bottle or wholesales for $89.95 per case (12 bottles). US Farms Aloe Vera Juice can be ordered online with Visa, Master Card, Discover, or American Express or by calling their customer service.

US Farms Aloe Vera Juice is an exclusive proprietary formulation which includes: Aloe Vera Juice (Barbadensis Miller), White Grape, Cranberry, Concord Grape and Black Cherry juice concentrate which are potent anti-oxidants and phyto-nutrients.

If you are interested in sampling their new and exciting Aloe Vera Juice will be offered for a limited time, a free 32 oz. bottle of US Farms Aloe Vera juice. Visit their website at http://jugodealoevera.com/sample.html

About US Farms Aloe Vera Juice

What sets US Farms Aloe Vera Juice apart from others is our farm fresh crop. Our Aloe Vera is hand harvested and cultivated using the best farming practices to ensure the highest quality. We blend our high-grade Aloe Vera with just the right amount of all-natural fruit juices to give it a great taste.

Aloe Vera has been known for centuries and used by people thought out the world. Aloe Barbadensis Miller (leaf inner gel) contains a wide variety of nutrients, including vitamins, minerals, and amino acids. These nutrients, along with the phyto-nutrients in the fruit juices, as well as the anti-oxidants they contain, they say makes their Aloe Vera juice the perfect complement to an active lifestyle.

We know all of us can enjoy the rewards of adding Aloe Vera Juice to our diets. Will we?

Source: US Farms, Inc.

Clear your mind here

Clear your mind here

Jones Soda Co. celebrates Hispanic heritage with new flavors

SEATTLE, Wash. – Jones Soda Co. is excited to introduce a new collection of Spanish labels and soda flavors honoring the culture and spirit of Hispanics living in America. This collection stems from numerous requests from Jones Soda fans, and features Spanish labels and images that celebrate the community and Hispanic artwork.
“Jones Soda is thrilled that fans from the Hispanic community have reached out to us, and we are very excited about our fun new flavors,” said Joth Ricci, COO of Jones Soda. “Jones Soda’s ability to customize our labels allows us to participate in the celebration of this amazing community in a unique and special way.”
Jones Soda is known for their ability to make personal connections with consumers through their patented labeling system that enables them to select submitted photos from fans to showcase on bottles, as well as allows people to create customized bottles at http://www.myjones.com .
The specialty sodas will be available in the following new flavors: Naranja Mandarina, Limón, Tutti Frutti and Crema de Piña. It will debut in the single-serve sections of select retailers in Los Angeles, San Diego and Arizona.
For more information visit http://www.jonessoda.com .
About Jones Soda Co.:
Headquartered in Seattle, Washington, Jones Soda Co. markets and distributes premium beverages under the Jones Soda, Jones Pure Cane Soda, Jones 24C, Jones GABA, Jones Organics, Jones Naturals and Whoopass brands and sells through its distribution network in markets across North America. A leader in the premium soda category, Jones is known for its variety of flavors and innovative labeling technique that incorporates always-changing photos sent in from its consumers. For more information visit http://www.jonessoda.com and http://www.myjones.com .
Source: Richmond Public Relations

SEATTLE, Wash. – Jones Soda Co. is excited to introduce a new collection of Spanish labels and soda flavors honoring the culture and spirit of Hispanics living in America. This collection stems from numerous requests from Jones Soda fans, and features Spanish labels and images that celebrate the community and Hispanic artwork.

New Hispanic Jones Soda flavors

New Hispanic Jones Soda flavors

“Jones Soda is thrilled that fans from the Hispanic community have reached out to us, and we are very excited about our fun new flavors,” said Joth Ricci, COO of Jones Soda. “Jones Soda’s ability to customize our labels allows us to participate in the celebration of this amazing community in a unique and special way.”

Jones Soda is known for their ability to make personal connections with consumers through their patented labeling system that enables them to select submitted photos from fans to showcase on bottles, as well as allows people to create customized bottles at http://www.myjones.com .

The specialty sodas will be available in the following new flavors: Naranja Mandarina, Limón, Tutti Frutti and Crema de Piña. It will debut in the single-serve sections of select retailers in Los Angeles, San Diego and Arizona.

For more information visit http://www.jonessoda.com .

About Jones Soda Co.:

Headquartered in Seattle, Washington, Jones Soda Co. markets and distributes premium beverages under the Jones Soda, Jones Pure Cane Soda, Jones 24C, Jones GABA, Jones Organics, Jones Naturals and Whoopass brands and sells through its distribution network in markets across North America. A leader in the premium soda category, Jones is known for its variety of flavors and innovative labeling technique that incorporates always-changing photos sent in from its consumers. For more information visit http://www.jonessoda.com and http://www.myjones.com .

Meet the Colombians!!!
A little about Dominicans
be mindful when it comes to words

be mindful when it comes to words

Source: Richmond Public Relations