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Emerging U.S. Hispanic Market Brimming with Opportunity

The rapid expansion of Hispanics into American suburbs presents sizable opportunities for marketers who understand the rich cultural diversity and purchasing attitudes of this segment, according to the latest Consumer Dynamics study from Acxiom® Corporation.

The study, titled “Getting Into the Market Share Race With the Emerging Hispburbanite Market,” taps into the explosive growth centered in 10 markets.

Emerging U.S. Hispanic Market:

  • Charlotte, NC
  • Nashville-Davidson, TN
  • Raleigh, NC
  • Memphis, TN
  • Greensboro, NC
  • Little Rock, AR
  • Indianapolis, IN
  • Birmingham, AL
  • Minneapolis, MN
  • Aurora, CO

The study reveals:

  • Hispanic suburban expansion is projected to continue.
  • The Hispanic market encompasses four distinct Hispburbanite groups.
  • Marketers have above average growth opportunities in areas with high concentrations of Hispanics.
  • Marketers should segment this culturally diverse group for maximum marketing impact.

The study shows Hispburbanites differ from Hispanics living in the main port-of-entry cities of New York, Los Angeles and Miami as they tend to be younger, more acculturated, single and wealthier. They tend to fall into four distinct groups:

  • Upstarts and Upbringing – Made up of some of the younger Hispanic households, this is the most acculturated of all groups. They primarily speak English away from home and are a mix of singles and recently married couples, some with young children.
  • Trendy Traditions – A somewhat younger mix, this group is mostly single and childless. Though slightly less acculturated than Upstarts and Upbringing, this group prefers American name brands and brand-name bargains.
  • Recent Arrivals –The least acculturated of all groups, these households more frequently comprise immigrants who have resided less than 10 years in the United States. They prefer to speak Spanish at home and away, and are primarily single renters with low to middle incomes.
  • White Picket Fences – A married and single mix of adults with above-average income makes up this group. Often owning their own homes, these households are more comfortable with financial institutions than other groups and are building net worth. This group is primarily English speaking and while they do save, their incomes allow for plentiful shopping, especially for jewelry and business clothing.

Overall, Hispburbanites tend to be mostly second- and third-generation Hispanics with increasing consumer buying power. “This market represents tremendous opportunity for companies across industries,” said the Acxiom’s senior manager for analytic, geospatial and segmentation products. “Segmentation allows marketers to target initiatives that encompass cultural preferences based on the characteristics of the defined consumer groups.

“Intelligent marketing decisions will maximize results, greatly improving return on marketing dollars spent,”  he added. “At a time when marketers are under intense scrutiny to produce measurable results, this study provides invaluable consumer insights.”

Source: Acxiom

Bilingual Hispanics Media Use

When Hispanics turn on their televisions over half of them are tuning into an English language show. Read how Bilingual Hispanics live with ease in both worlds.

According to a recent Ipsos U.S. Hispanic Omnibus study, U.S. Hispanics, regardless of whether their language preference at home is English (43%), or Spanish (52%), are turning to either language to meet their needs. When Hispanics turn on their televisions over half of them are tuning into an English language program.

Younger viewers are not the dominating presence in front of the English language small screen. Hispanics, aged 18-34, are actually less likely (54%) than older Hispanics, aged 55+, to prefer English language television (61%). And:

  • 52% of Hispanics aged 35-54  prefer English language television.
  • 45% percent of Hispanics with children in the household say that they prefer Spanish language television.
  • 63% of Hispanic households without children are highly likely to prefer English television
  • 80% of College educated Hispanics prefer English language television

Mixing languages does not complicate the lives of United States Bilingual Hispanics who are living with ease in both worlds – one that is in English and the other that is in Spanish, concludes the report.

The person playing that Spanish beats music on radio is most likely to be a Hispanic female (51%), as they are more likely than Hispanic males (38%) to tune into Spanish radio. Among radio preferences overall, Hispanics are practically split as 49% stated that they listen to English language radio while 45% percent listen to Spanish language radio.

  • Hispanics aged 55+ are more likely to prefer radio in English than in Spanish (56% vs. 38%)
  • Among those 35-54, half (50%) prefer radio in English.
  • Hispanics, aged 18-34, are practically split among preference as 46% prefer English and 47% prefer Spanish radio.
  • 55% of all Hispanics said that their language preference for the Internet is English.
  • 39% of Hispanics age 18-34 prefer Spanish language internet sites
  • 42% of Hispanic females prefer Spanish when surfing the web compared to just twenty nine percent (29%) of Hispanic men

53% of Hispanics read the news and they are looking for information in both languages:

  • 53% in English to find out the current affairs in their local U.S. city
  • 33% in Spanish to follow up with the news in their home country
  • 44% read Spanish newspapers that cover news in their community in the United States. 57%, with an annual household income under $50,000, do so

Cynthia Pelayo, Ipsos senior research manager, says “… many US Hispanics continue to speak primarily Spanish, among their peers, family and friends, to watch television in Spanish and to be involved in cultural community events that are mostly conducted in Spanish.”

She goes on to note that their innate skill to utilize either language is an advantage in functioning in US institutions while preserving their Hispanic heritage.

Bilingual Advertising Campaign Pepsi Next
Hispanic Acculturation Process
I am a Wise Latina Too!
When it comes to a kid's television-viewing habits, the mom's language can matter.

With a sample of this size, notes the report, the results are considered accurate within ± 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20, of what they would have been had the entire population adult homeowners in the U.S. been polled. These data were weighted to ensure the sample’s regional and age/gender composition reflects that of the actual U.S. population according to data from the U.S. Census Bureau.

Source:Jack Loechner – http://www.mediapost.com/publications/index.cfm?fa=Articles.showArticle&art_aid=100359&passFuseAction=PublicationsSearch.showSearchReslts&art_searched=hispanic&page_number=0

Emerging U.S. Hispanic Market Brimming with Opportunity

The rapid expansion of Hispanics into American suburbs presents sizable opportunities for marketers who understand the rich cultural diversity and purchasing attitudes of this segment, according to the latest Consumer Dynamics study from Acxiom® Corporation.

The study, titled “Getting Into the Market Share Race With the Emerging Hispburbanite Market,” taps into the explosive growth centered in 10 markets.

Emerging U.S. Hispanic Market:

  • Charlotte, NC
  • Nashville-Davidson, TN
  • Raleigh, NC
  • Memphis, TN
  • Greensboro, NC
  • Little Rock, AR
  • Indianapolis, IN
  • Birmingham, AL
  • Minneapolis, MN
  • Aurora, CO

The study reveals:

  • Hispanic suburban expansion is projected to continue.
  • The Hispanic market encompasses four distinct Hispburbanite groups.
  • Marketers have above average growth opportunities in areas with high concentrations of Hispanics.
  • Marketers should segment this culturally diverse group for maximum marketing impact.

The study shows Hispburbanites differ from Hispanics living in the main port-of-entry cities of New York, Los Angeles and Miami as they tend to be younger, more acculturated, single and wealthier. They tend to fall into four distinct groups:

  • Upstarts and Upbringing – Made up of some of the younger Hispanic households, this is the most acculturated of all groups. They primarily speak English away from home and are a mix of singles and recently married couples, some with young children.
  • Trendy Traditions – A somewhat younger mix, this group is mostly single and childless. Though slightly less acculturated than Upstarts and Upbringing, this group prefers American name brands and brand-name bargains.
  • Recent Arrivals –The least acculturated of all groups, these households more frequently comprise immigrants who have resided less than 10 years in the United States. They prefer to speak Spanish at home and away, and are primarily single renters with low to middle incomes.
  • White Picket Fences – A married and single mix of adults with above-average income makes up this group. Often owning their own homes, these households are more comfortable with financial institutions than other groups and are building net worth. This group is primarily English speaking and while they do save, their incomes allow for plentiful shopping, especially for jewelry and business clothing.

Overall, Hispburbanites tend to be mostly second- and third-generation Hispanics with increasing consumer buying power. “This market represents tremendous opportunity for companies across industries,” said the Acxiom’s senior manager for analytic, geospatial and segmentation products. “Segmentation allows marketers to target initiatives that encompass cultural preferences based on the characteristics of the defined consumer groups.

“Intelligent marketing decisions will maximize results, greatly improving return on marketing dollars spent,”  he added. “At a time when marketers are under intense scrutiny to produce measurable results, this study provides invaluable consumer insights.”

Source: Acxiom

Bilingual Hispanics Media Use

When Hispanics turn on their televisions over half of them are tuning into an English language show. Read how Bilingual Hispanics live with ease in both worlds.

According to a recent Ipsos U.S. Hispanic Omnibus study, U.S. Hispanics, regardless of whether their language preference at home is English (43%), or Spanish (52%), are turning to either language to meet their needs. When Hispanics turn on their televisions over half of them are tuning into an English language program.

Younger viewers are not the dominating presence in front of the English language small screen. Hispanics, aged 18-34, are actually less likely (54%) than older Hispanics, aged 55+, to prefer English language television (61%). And:

  • 52% of Hispanics aged 35-54  prefer English language television.
  • 45% percent of Hispanics with children in the household say that they prefer Spanish language television.
  • 63% of Hispanic households without children are highly likely to prefer English television
  • 80% of College educated Hispanics prefer English language television

Mixing languages does not complicate the lives of United States Bilingual Hispanics who are living with ease in both worlds – one that is in English and the other that is in Spanish, concludes the report.

The person playing that Spanish beats music on radio is most likely to be a Hispanic female (51%), as they are more likely than Hispanic males (38%) to tune into Spanish radio. Among radio preferences overall, Hispanics are practically split as 49% stated that they listen to English language radio while 45% percent listen to Spanish language radio.

  • Hispanics aged 55+ are more likely to prefer radio in English than in Spanish (56% vs. 38%)
  • Among those 35-54, half (50%) prefer radio in English.
  • Hispanics, aged 18-34, are practically split among preference as 46% prefer English and 47% prefer Spanish radio.
  • 55% of all Hispanics said that their language preference for the Internet is English.
  • 39% of Hispanics age 18-34 prefer Spanish language internet sites
  • 42% of Hispanic females prefer Spanish when surfing the web compared to just twenty nine percent (29%) of Hispanic men

53% of Hispanics read the news and they are looking for information in both languages:

  • 53% in English to find out the current affairs in their local U.S. city
  • 33% in Spanish to follow up with the news in their home country
  • 44% read Spanish newspapers that cover news in their community in the United States. 57%, with an annual household income under $50,000, do so

Cynthia Pelayo, Ipsos senior research manager, says “… many US Hispanics continue to speak primarily Spanish, among their peers, family and friends, to watch television in Spanish and to be involved in cultural community events that are mostly conducted in Spanish.”

She goes on to note that their innate skill to utilize either language is an advantage in functioning in US institutions while preserving their Hispanic heritage.

Bilingual Advertising Campaign Pepsi Next
Hispanic Acculturation Process
I am a Wise Latina Too!
When it comes to a kid's television-viewing habits, the mom's language can matter.

With a sample of this size, notes the report, the results are considered accurate within ± 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20, of what they would have been had the entire population adult homeowners in the U.S. been polled. These data were weighted to ensure the sample’s regional and age/gender composition reflects that of the actual U.S. population according to data from the U.S. Census Bureau.

Source:Jack Loechner – http://www.mediapost.com/publications/index.cfm?fa=Articles.showArticle&art_aid=100359&passFuseAction=PublicationsSearch.showSearchReslts&art_searched=hispanic&page_number=0

Salsarita’s Fresh Cantina Strong Growth in First Half of 2009

Rapidly Growing Fresh-Mex Franchise Opens Four New Restaurants; Signs Agreements for 28 New Locations with Goal of 200 Restaurants by 2012

Salsarita's Fresh Cantina, one of the nation's fastest growing, fast-casual Mexican restaurant chains

Salsarita’s Fresh Cantina, one of the nation’s fastest growing, fast-casual Mexican restaurant chains

CHARLOTTE, N.C., June 22 /PRNewswire/ –Salsarita’s Fresh Cantina, one of the nation’s fastest growing, fast-casual Mexican restaurant chains has experienced great success in 2009 with the opening of four new restaurants and signed agreements for 28 more locations in the U.S. and Puerto Rico. The company is currently closing in on its first hundred restaurants with the goal of opening 200 restaurants by 2012.

With new locations opening across the country, the company is quickly gaining brand recognition and a reputation for quality and legendary hospitality. Despite the economic downturn, Salsarita’s has announced that Minneapolis,Jacksonville, Detroit, Raleigh-Durham, Birmingham, Nashville, Upstate New York and Baltimore will be key markets for its 2009 expansion plans.

“We are very excited about the progress we’ve made in the first half of 2009 and are looking to expand our high-quality, Fresh-Mexican concept to new and existing markets across the country,” said Paul Mangiamele, president and CEO, Salsarita’s Fresh Cantina. “With successful penetration in select southern and northeastern markets, Salsarita’s is setting its sights on building a nationally competitive franchise brand.”

Most recently, Salsarita’s opened two restaurants in Charlotte, NC and single units in Murfreesboro and Knoxville, TN.A 20 unit store development agreement was signed in the Upstate New York region and agreements with franchisees have been signed in Clarence, NY, Overland Park, KS, Greenville, NC and Puerto Rico.

Salsarita’s is currently looking for qualified candidates with food service, operations or real estate experience to join its team as area representatives, area developers or single-unit franchisees. The estimated initial investment is between$296,700 and $577,100 depending on the real estate selection ranging from 2,200 to 2,700 square-feet, which is inclusive of the $25,000 franchise fee. The company’s comprehensive training and support program includes a three-week Burrito Boot Camp at the corporate headquarters, pre- and post-grand opening on-site support and ongoing business coaching.

“With more customers visiting fast-casual concepts instead of traditional full-service, sit-down restaurants, Salsarita’s is well positioned to succeed during this time of economic uncertainty,” said Mangiamele. “Fresh-Mexican is an up and coming concept and Salsarita’s fills this growing niche in the franchise industry.”

Salsarita’s specializes in serving made-to-order burritos, tacos, tortilla, pizza’s and taco salads. Prepared fresh-daily in each restaurant, guests can enjoy high-quality dishes featuring ground beef, grilled chicken, grilled steak, or pork, grilled shrimp and fresh vegetables. Salsarita’s also offers a choice of 13 delicious fillings and four homemade salsas. Every order is prepared in full view of customers in a 700-square-foot display kitchen with a contemporary Hispanic motif.

Source: Salsarita’s Fresh Cantina

More Grocery Chains Say Bienvenidos to the Hispanic Market

Arroz con leche. Comfort food Latin style. #youeatwithyoureyesfirst

Arroz con leche. Comfort food Latin style. #youeatwithyoureyesfirst

With the popularity of cooking Mexican cuisine at home on the rise, and the fast-growing Hispanic-American population, it’s no surprise that retailers, specifically grocers, are paying more attention to the Hispanic markets. More and more stores are bringing the Hispanic foods out of the ethnic aisle and into the mainstream sections of the stores.

Supermarket chains, like Publix, now offer Mexican spices among the parsley and thyme, and queso fresco and chorizo can be found next to the Parmigiano-Regianno and Roquefort in the refrigerator cases. National chain Walmart is also aiming to appeal to Hispanic shoppers with two test Supermercados debuting in Houston and Phoenix. Likewise, Sam’s Club is opening a Hispanic-oriented store called Mas this Summer in Houston.
Although the recession might not be a good time to develop new cultural marketing strategies, according to a report by the Food Marketing Institute, Hispanic consumers shop for groceries more often than the average American. They also cook from scratch more and purchase more fresh ingredients. Since I’m a huge fan of embracing all types of cuisine, I’m happy to hear that Mexican food items will be easier to find. How do you feel about the news?

With the popularity of cooking Mexican cuisine at home on the rise, and the fast-growing Hispanic-American population, it’s no surprise that retailers, specifically grocery chains, are paying more attention to the Hispanic markets. More and more stores are bringing the Hispanic foods out of the ethnic aisle and into the mainstream sections of the stores.

Supermarket and grocery chains, like Publix, now offer Mexican spices among the parsley and thyme, and queso fresco and chorizo can be found next to the Parmigiano-Regianno and Roquefort in the refrigerator cases. National chain Walmart is also aiming to appeal to Hispanic shoppers with two test Supermercados debuting in Houston and Phoenix. Likewise, Sam’s Club is opening a Hispanic-oriented store called Mas this Summer in Houston.

According to a report by the Food Marketing Institute, Hispanic consumers shop for groceries more often than the average American. They also cook from scratch more and purchase more fresh ingredients. Since I’m a huge fan of embracing all types of cuisine, I’m happy to hear that Mexican food items will be easier to find. How do you feel about the news?

Source: Partysugar – More Grocery Chains Say Bienvenidos to the Hispanic Market
Arroz con leche. Comfort food Latin style. #youeatwithyoureyesfirst

Arroz con leche. Comfort food Latin style. #youeatwithyoureyesfirst

Jones Soda Co. celebrates Hispanic heritage with new flavors

SEATTLE, Wash. – Jones Soda Co. is excited to introduce a new collection of Spanish labels and soda flavors honoring the culture and spirit of Hispanics living in America. This collection stems from numerous requests from Jones Soda fans, and features Spanish labels and images that celebrate the community and Hispanic artwork.
“Jones Soda is thrilled that fans from the Hispanic community have reached out to us, and we are very excited about our fun new flavors,” said Joth Ricci, COO of Jones Soda. “Jones Soda’s ability to customize our labels allows us to participate in the celebration of this amazing community in a unique and special way.”
Jones Soda is known for their ability to make personal connections with consumers through their patented labeling system that enables them to select submitted photos from fans to showcase on bottles, as well as allows people to create customized bottles at http://www.myjones.com .
The specialty sodas will be available in the following new flavors: Naranja Mandarina, Limón, Tutti Frutti and Crema de Piña. It will debut in the single-serve sections of select retailers in Los Angeles, San Diego and Arizona.
For more information visit http://www.jonessoda.com .
About Jones Soda Co.:
Headquartered in Seattle, Washington, Jones Soda Co. markets and distributes premium beverages under the Jones Soda, Jones Pure Cane Soda, Jones 24C, Jones GABA, Jones Organics, Jones Naturals and Whoopass brands and sells through its distribution network in markets across North America. A leader in the premium soda category, Jones is known for its variety of flavors and innovative labeling technique that incorporates always-changing photos sent in from its consumers. For more information visit http://www.jonessoda.com and http://www.myjones.com .
Source: Richmond Public Relations

SEATTLE, Wash. – Jones Soda Co. is excited to introduce a new collection of Spanish labels and soda flavors honoring the culture and spirit of Hispanics living in America. This collection stems from numerous requests from Jones Soda fans, and features Spanish labels and images that celebrate the community and Hispanic artwork.

New Hispanic Jones Soda flavors

New Hispanic Jones Soda flavors

“Jones Soda is thrilled that fans from the Hispanic community have reached out to us, and we are very excited about our fun new flavors,” said Joth Ricci, COO of Jones Soda. “Jones Soda’s ability to customize our labels allows us to participate in the celebration of this amazing community in a unique and special way.”

Jones Soda is known for their ability to make personal connections with consumers through their patented labeling system that enables them to select submitted photos from fans to showcase on bottles, as well as allows people to create customized bottles at http://www.myjones.com .

The specialty sodas will be available in the following new flavors: Naranja Mandarina, Limón, Tutti Frutti and Crema de Piña. It will debut in the single-serve sections of select retailers in Los Angeles, San Diego and Arizona.

For more information visit http://www.jonessoda.com .

About Jones Soda Co.:

Headquartered in Seattle, Washington, Jones Soda Co. markets and distributes premium beverages under the Jones Soda, Jones Pure Cane Soda, Jones 24C, Jones GABA, Jones Organics, Jones Naturals and Whoopass brands and sells through its distribution network in markets across North America. A leader in the premium soda category, Jones is known for its variety of flavors and innovative labeling technique that incorporates always-changing photos sent in from its consumers. For more information visit http://www.jonessoda.com and http://www.myjones.com .

Latin Diet Pyramid - Copyright 2009 Oldways Preservation & Exchange Trust - http://www.oldwayspt.org/
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be mindful when it comes to words

be mindful when it comes to words

Source: Richmond Public Relations

Will we have a National Museum of the American Latino?

VARCom President Named to Commission to Study the Creation of a National Museum of the American Latino

VARCom Solutions announces that its President, Raul Danny Vargas, a recognized Northern Virginia business leader, was nominated to serve on a commission to study the creation of a National Museum of the American Latino.

Signed into law by President Bush on May 8, 2008 as part of the Consolidated Natural Resources Act of 2008, the 23-member Commission will study the potential creation of a National Museum of American Latino Heritage inWashington, D.C. and will provide a report back to Congress detailing its recommendations (including a fund-raising plan).

House Minority Leader John Boehner recently appointed Mr. Vargas at the urging of Congressman Wolf, who emphasized Vargas’ contributions to the business community and his service to the region and the country.

“I was very proud to nominate Danny for this important commission,” said Wolf. He added, “I have no doubt that he will serve with distinction and will continue to be a positive role model not only for Hispanics but for all Americans who aspire to overcome adversity, achieve success and give back to their communities.”

“It is truly an honor to serve as a commissioner on this important initiative, and I so appreciate the support from Congressman Wolf and Leader Boehner,” stated Vargas. “Hispanics have played a pivotal role in America’s history going back to the voyages of Columbus. It is my hope that this museum will serve to highlight these contribution and to provide Hispanic youth with a perspective on what they can strive to achieve.”

Members of the commission are appointed by the White House, Senate Majority and Minority Leaders, the Speaker of the House, and the House Minority Leader. Mr. Vargas will serve on the commission along with other prominent Hispanics from across the country, including actress and philanthropist, Eva Longoria Parker.

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Thought of the Day

human rights are not optional

human rights are not optional

Source: PRNewswire

Understanding Hispanic Market Segmentation – Part I

Let’s talk segmentation – Part I

by Claudia Goffan  CEO of Target Latino
Graphics by Jim Perez

Hispanic Market Segmentation:

The reasons behind the use of acculturation levels in Hispanic Marketing. Hispanic Market segments and projected size by Claudia Goffan, CEO of Target Latino.

Why levels of acculturation?

  • In the 1900’s European immigrants would force their children to forget about the customs of the “old world” and “just be” Americans – this was a process of assimilation
  • To acculturate means to incorporate or acquire a new culture without foregoing another one
  • Hispanics do not “assimilate”, they “acculturate”. They do not let go of customs and/or language

Facts about Hispanic Market Segmentation

Hispanic Market Segmentation

Hispanic Market Segmentation

The three segments by Acculturation Levels

  • Non-Acculturated: Persons that only navigate within the Latino culture. Most of them have recently immigrated to the U.S. and prefer to speak Spanish
  • Acculturated: Persons born in the U.S. of Hispanic descent. They prefer to speak English and can navigate into the Latino culture
  • Semi-Acculturated: People that can navigate in both cultures.

What factors get them from one segment to the next?

  • Fully-Acculturated: Hispanics are proud of their culture and parents will tend to teach their U.S.-born children the customs of their ancestors
  • Non-Acculturated: Hispanics born outside of the U.S. can only navigate from non-acculturation to semi-acculturation. The speed at which this will take place depends on these three major factors:
    –Time
    –Education
    –Socio economic status in country of origin

How fast will the market acculturate?

The speed at which this will take place depends on these three major factors:

  • Time: the longer they live in the US, the longer they are exposed to a new culture and are able to incorporate it into their everyday lives
  • Education: the higher their education level, the easier the understanding of another culture will be
  • Socio economic status in country of origin: the higher the socio economic status they enjoyed in their country of origin, the higher the likelihood that they have been exposed to other cultures, thus enabling a faster and smoother transition

Here are some examples of acculturation levels and speed:

  • My brother was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina -30 years old at the time-, highly educated -a lawyer-, seasoned international traveler and with 6 years of English studies from the London Cultural Institute under his belt. He was visiting me in Los Angeles.
    On the second day of his visit, I arrived home to find him holding a box of sugar and laughing so hard he was in tears. He kept on saying, “soy un sudaca (I am so third world).” I didn’t understand what he was talking about at first, so I waited for him to calm down. When he did, he explained to me that he had ripped the top of the box open in order to reach the sugar at which time he realized that there was a pouring spout on its side.As you can see, it took him just a few minutes to “acculturate”, that is, to learn to navigate in the American culture (at least a little bit).
  • A friend of mine took a little longer to acculturate. She is also very well educated -a dentist- and a world traveler, but is older than my brother and understands very little English. Apparently she had bought a brand of laundry detergent at the supermarket to wash a sweatshirt I had given her. After washing it, she remarked that the sweatshirt was of low quality, because it had faded so badly. I was puzzled, but soon forgot about it.When she returned back to her country, she left the “detergent” with me. I immediately noticed that it wasn’t detergent at all, it was “bleach.” She had mistaken a product type for a brand. No wonder the blue sweatshirt had faded.In order to acculturate she had to be told about her mistake. You can bet she never did that again.
  • Latino banks spend more than a year teaching its underserved Hispanic customers how to use the ATM machines. The reason is that most of their customers have never used one. The bank is acculturating them into American society.

Differentiating Characteristics between segments – Hispanic Market Segmentation

Hispanic Market Segment Characteristics

Hispanic Market Size

  • Population: 42.7 million as of July 1, 2005 or 14 percent of the nation’s total population. (This estimate does not include the 3.9 million residents of Puerto Rico.)
  • 102.6 million – The projected Hispanic population as of July 1, 2050 or 24 percent of the nation’s total population on that date.
    -Source: Census data
  • We need to be aware that in this market there is about a 40% to 50% undercount

Hispanic Market Size by Acculturation Levels Segment

Hispanic Market Segments Size

Hispanic Market Segments Size

By Havi Goffan, CEO of Target Latino

http://www.targetlatino.com/

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here's the thing #SethGodin #Quote

here’s the thing #SethGodin #Quote